Finian's Rainbow

Finian's Rainbow

4.7 4
Director: Francis Ford Coppola, Fred Astaire, Petula Clark, Tommy Steele

Cast: Francis Ford Coppola, Fred Astaire, Petula Clark, Tommy Steele

     
 

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Nearly 20 years after it opened on Broadway, the E.Y. Harburg/Fred Saidy musical Finian's Rainbow was committed to film. Set in the mythical southern state of Missitucky, the story involves the whimsical Irishman Finian (Fred Astaire) and his daughter Sharon (Petula Clark) arriving in the community carrying a crock of gold, which they've stolen in the Auld Sod

Overview

Nearly 20 years after it opened on Broadway, the E.Y. Harburg/Fred Saidy musical Finian's Rainbow was committed to film. Set in the mythical southern state of Missitucky, the story involves the whimsical Irishman Finian (Fred Astaire) and his daughter Sharon (Petula Clark) arriving in the community carrying a crock of gold, which they've stolen in the Auld Sod from Ogg the Leprechaun (Tommy Steele). Finian believes that if he buries the crock on American soil, it will grow into an even larger treasure--just as Fort Knox did (or so he thinks). Sharon falls in love with sharecropper Woody Mahoney (Don Francks), who like everyone else in the community is being threatened by the perfidy of Senator Rawkins (Keenan Wynn). While Finian haggles over three wishes with the tricky Ogg, Sharon runs afoul of the racially bigoted Rawkins. She wishes that Rawkins would turn black so that he could walk in someone else's shoes for a change--and this, thanks to Ogg, is exactly what happens. To rescue Sharon and Woody from being burned as witches, Ogg grants a last wish, which turns him into a human being; this is not an altogether bad thing, for Ogg has fallen in love with mysterious mountain gal Susan the Silent (Barbara Hancock). The racial tolerance subtext of Finian's Rainbow, considered radical in 1948, seemed rather antiquated in 1969, though it did allow for a hilarious scene in which a white associate of Judge Rawkins attempts to instruct young black botanist Al Freeman Jr. on the proper way to "act Negro." As Finian, Fred Astaire requested that the role be expanded to allow him to dance a little (as written, the character barely even sings). Most of the original score remains intact, including the hit song "How Are Things in Glocca Morra?" Francis Ford Coppola seemed a curious choice to direct a musical, and indeed the production was a troubled one due to Coppola's inexperience in the genre.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/03/2016
UPC:
0888574407001
Original Release:
1968
Rating:
G
Source:
Warner Archives
Sound:
[Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound]
Time:
2:25:00
Sales rank:
2,358

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Fred Astaire Finian McLonergan
Petula Clark Sharon McLonergan
Tommy Steele Og, the Leprechaun
Don Francks Woody Mahoney
Keenan Wynn Judge Billboard Rawkins
Barbara Hancock Susan The Silent
Al Freeman Howard
Ronald Colby Buzz Collins
Dolph Sweet Sheriff
Wright King District Attorney
Roy E. Glenn Actor
Jester Hairston Passion Pilgrim Gospeleers
Susan Hancock Actor
Avon Long Actor

Technical Credits
Francis Ford Coppola Director
Phillip Abramson Set Decoration/Design
Gordon Bau Makeup
Hilyard M. Brown Production Designer
Joel Freeman Producer
Fred Gammon Asst. Director
E.Y. "Yip" Harburg Score Composer,Screenwriter
Ray Heindorf Score Composer,Musical Direction/Supervision
Dorothy Jeakins Costumes/Costume Designer
William L. Kuehl Set Decoration/Design
Joseph Landon Producer
Burton Lane Score Composer
Philip H. Lathrop Cinematographer
M.A. Merrick Sound/Sound Designer
Hermes Pan Choreography
Fred Saidy Screenwriter
Melvin Shapiro Editor
Dan Wallin Sound/Sound Designer

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Finian's Rainbow 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although there are only 4 or 5 songs in this movie, you should recognize at least 3 of them. The acting and dancing is energetic and fanciful. Enjoyed Fred Astare and Tommy Steele with delight.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It has all the components needed for an enjoyable movie, great actors, great music/songs/dances, great drama, and great comedy. If you enjoy any Fred Astaire movies this is a must for your collection.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago