Food Beware: The French Organic Revolution

Overview

Documentary filmmaker Jean-Paul Jaud sets out to discover if contemporary society can create a food supply that isn't littered with contaminants by exploring the current trend of organic, localized food production in France. The current generation is the very first in history that will grow up less healthy than the one that preceded it. Cancer and infertility rates are skyrocketing. Could it have something to do with our tainted food supplies? By paying a visit to a remote French village where the lunch menu is ...
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Overview

Documentary filmmaker Jean-Paul Jaud sets out to discover if contemporary society can create a food supply that isn't littered with contaminants by exploring the current trend of organic, localized food production in France. The current generation is the very first in history that will grow up less healthy than the one that preceded it. Cancer and infertility rates are skyrocketing. Could it have something to do with our tainted food supplies? By paying a visit to a remote French village where the lunch menu is comprised entirely of organic, locally grown foods, Jaud highlights the ways in which some communities are shunning food industry giants to go back to the basics. A wide variety of interviews with everyone from researchers to schoolchildren reveal the deep flaws that exist within the food industry and raise thought-provoking questions about what can be done to correct them.
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
The French documentary Food Beware is a bit like days-old whole wheat bread: it's bland and dry, but it's still good for you. That is, if you can bear to eat it. Originally titled Nos Enfants Nous Accuseront Our Children Will Accuse Us, this film begins by stating statistics of the shockingly high, ever-growing cancer rates in Europe, a large number of which are attributed to the environment, food, and pollution. The mayor of a picturesque French village thinks he has found a solution: change the school cafeteria from the standard canned and frozen fare to organic food. The normal lunchroom offerings hide unwanted additives such as nitrites, pesticides, and lead, and the mayor and his citizens hope that the change will have a positive effect on the children's health and future. Food Beware transitions between chronicling the efforts of the school and the townspeople to focusing on evidence and anecdotes about the dangers of regular food. The village's children are largely eager to make the change, and the switch soon moves beyond the cafeteria and into some of their homes. Though food preparation involves more work for the lunchroom workers, they demonstrate pride in making foods from scratch, instead of merely reheating prepackaged elements. Meanwhile, scientists discuss the widespread effects of nonorganic food, particularly on children. The personal stories of farmers who work with pesticides rank as the film's most affecting, effective moments, revealing the perils for those who work closely with these chemicals. The ideas that fuel this film are valuable, and Food Beware follows in the tradition of post-millennial, pro-organic opuses. Films such as No Impact Man and Food, Inc. have persuaded audiences to their causes, and In Defense of Food author Michael Pollan is a fixture on best-seller lists. Food Beware arrives at an integral time when organic eating and sustainable living are frequent conversation topics, but it's a bit too long and lackluster to hold the audience's attention.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 11/17/2009
  • UPC: 720229914079
  • Original Release: 2008
  • Rating:

  • Source: First Run Features
  • Presentation: Wide Screen / Subtitled
  • Time: 1:52:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 50,012

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Périco Légasse Participant
Technical Credits
Jean-Paul Jaud Director, Camera Operator
Amar Arhab Camera Operator, Cinematographer
Beatrice Camurat-Jaud Producer
Valérie Firla Editor
Denis Guilhem Sound/Sound Designer
Arnaud Julien Sound/Sound Designer
Julien Kongs Editor
Frédéric Monpierre Editor
Eric Munch Sound/Sound Designer
Marc Pernet Sound Mixer
Joël Pierron Camera Operator, Cinematographer
Nicolas Samarine Sound/Sound Designer
Isabelle Szummny Editor
Isabelle Szumny Editor
Gabriel Yared Score Composer
Emilie Zeman Editor
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Food Beware: The French Organic Revolution
1. What Does Organic Mean? [10:33]
2. A Song About Food [11:51]
3. Deadly Peaches [7:19]
4. Raising Awareness [9:33]
5. Picnic at the Aqueduct [9:24]
6. A Question of Conscience [8:47]
7. Opposing Sides Meet [9:26]
8. A Difficult Diagnosis [12:13]
9. Farmer's Market [16:51]
10. A Celebration [8:55]
11. End Credits [2:35]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Food Beware: The French Organic Revolution
   Play Film
   Chapters
   First Run Features
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