Frontier Gal

Frontier Gal

Director: Charles Lamont, Yvonne de Carlo, Rod Cameron, Andy Devine

Cast: Charles Lamont, Yvonne de Carlo, Rod Cameron, Andy Devine

     
 
Johnny Hart (Rod Cameron) is on the run from the law after killing one of the men who shot his partner. He passes through a town and stops at a saloon owned by singer Lorena Dumont (Yvonne de Carlo). The two seem a good, albeit tempestuous match, although Johnny has no plans to marry -- Lorena has other ideas and a shotgun wedding ensues. Blackie (Sheldon Leonard), an

Overview

Johnny Hart (Rod Cameron) is on the run from the law after killing one of the men who shot his partner. He passes through a town and stops at a saloon owned by singer Lorena Dumont (Yvonne de Carlo). The two seem a good, albeit tempestuous match, although Johnny has no plans to marry -- Lorena has other ideas and a shotgun wedding ensues. Blackie (Sheldon Leonard), an outlaw who is jealous of the marriage, informs Lorena of Johnny's wanted status, and he ends up getting caught by the law after their wedding night. He serves six years and returns to find that he and Lorena don't get along any better than they did before, and that he's also the father of a five-year-old girl (Beverly Simmons). Also lurking about is Blackie, whom he recognizes as one of the men who killed his partner, and Blackie wants Johnny out of the way so he can marry Lorena. Johnny and Lorena fight over custody of their daughter and Blackie nearly gets them each killed at one point or another. He kidnaps their daughter before Johnny dispatches him. He finally realizes that the only way he can win Lorena is to meet her cup for cup and blow for blow, until she understands that he loves her. The film, a sort of Western Taming of the Shrew, ends on a note of romance and reconciliation.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Bruce Eder
Frontier Gal had a fairly convoluted pre-production history. It was originally intended as a vehicle forMaria Montez, who balked at doing the movie because of the plot -- she dreaded having to share scenes with a child actress, believing that the moppet would inevitably steal all of their scenes. When Montez declined to do the movie, the studio decided to avail itself of its latest discovery -- 23-year-old, Canadian-born Yvonne De Carlo, who, after spending the previous three years playing bit roles, had just broken through to a starring role in Salome Where She Danced a few months earlier. De Carlo got cast in the role of spitfire temptress Lorena Dumont, and cast opposite her was her fellow Canadian Rod Cameron, a dozen years her senior and an ex-stunt man and serial actor, who had been her co-star in Salome. The pairing was fortuitous; neither was a great actor at that point, but the two seemed to throw themselves into their roles with no holds barred, which meant that their verbal and physical sparring had an energy that carried the picture past its sillier plot convolutions and predictable elements. Above all in its own time, Frontier Gal was a fun movie when the two leads are going at it like Maggie and Jiggs, or when supporting players Andy Devine and Fuzzy Knight are engaging in some kind of comic relief. Coupled with Technicolor filming, which would have been a major part of its appeal in 1945, Frontier Gal was a nice light comedy-Western with serious undertones. Perhaps the only element that doesn't quite work is Sheldon Leonard's villainy, which is a little too nasty at times. Ideally, Frontier Gal should have tried to match the tone of, say, My Little Chickadee, and it's at its best when it doesn't get any more serious than that. Director Charles W. Lamont, who was ideal for the films of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello, was just a little out of his depth, but not fatally so, with this script. As it is, elements of the latter resemble and anticipate Andrew V. McLaglen's McLintock!, a John Wayne/Maureen O'Hara comic Western slugfest (coincidentally co-starring De Carlo) that was made 18 years later. Also notable, for those who notice the scoring of films, is the music attributed largely to Frank Skinner. It's often risky with pre-'60s Universal titles, whose scores were often a pastiche of various composers' work, to ascribe any music to a single composer, but parts of the score for Frontier Gal credited to Skinner subsequently turned up in the background score of Anthony Mann's Winchester '73, a much darker and more serious Western.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/28/2014
UPC:
0025192243264
Original Release:
1945
Source:
Universal Mod
Time:
1:32:00
Sales rank:
13,050

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Yvonne De Carlo Lorena Dumont
Rod Cameron Johnny Hart
Andy Devine Big Ben
Fuzzy Knight Fuzzy
Andrew Tombes Judge Prescott
Sheldon Leonard Blackie
Clara Blandick Abigail
Beverly Simmons Mary Ann Hart
Frank Lackteen Cherokee
Claire Carleton Gracie
Eddie Dunn Bailiff
Harold Goodwin Bailiff
Jack Overman Buffalo
Jan Wiley Sheila Winthrop
Rex Lease Henchman
Jack Ingram Dealer
George Eldredge Henchman
Lloyd Ingraham Dealer
Douglas Carter Dealer
Jean Trent Hostess
Kerry Vaughn Hostess
Karen Randle Hostess
Joe Bernard Actor
Eddie Borden Men at Table
Billy Engle Barfly
Joe Haworth Henchman
Eddie Lee Wing Lee
Cliff Lyons Brawler in Candy Shop
Jack O'Shea Actor
Jack Rutherford Actor
Joan Fulton Actor

Technical Credits
Charles Lamont Director
Charles P. Boyle Cinematographer
Jack Brooks Songwriter
Oliver Emert Set Decoration/Design
Edgar "Cookie" Fairchild Songwriter
Michael Fessier Producer,Screenwriter
John P. Fulton Special Effects
Russell A. Gausman Set Decoration/Design
John B. Goodman Art Director
Ernest Pagano Producer,Screenwriter
Richard H. Riedel Art Director
George Robinson Cinematographer
Frank Skinner Score Composer,Musical Direction/Supervision
Ray Snyder Editor

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