Gerry

( 4 )

Overview

Gus Van Sant returned to his roots in experimental filmmaking with this offbeat feature, whose dialogue was entirely improvised by its two person cast. Two men named Gerry (played by Matt Damon and Casey Affleck) are driving through the desert regions of Death Valley, traveling towards an unknown destination. They pull over and set out on foot, presuming they're getting close to what they've come to find. Before long, Gerry and Gerry are both lost in an unforgiving desert without food, water, or other provisions,...
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Overview

Gus Van Sant returned to his roots in experimental filmmaking with this offbeat feature, whose dialogue was entirely improvised by its two person cast. Two men named Gerry (played by Matt Damon and Casey Affleck) are driving through the desert regions of Death Valley, traveling towards an unknown destination. They pull over and set out on foot, presuming they're getting close to what they've come to find. Before long, Gerry and Gerry are both lost in an unforgiving desert without food, water, or other provisions, and the harder they try to find their way back to their car, they only dig themselves deeper and deeper into the desert. Gus Van Sant originally began shooting Gerry in Argentina, but was soon dissatisfied with the weather and the terrain, opting to start over in California and Utah; the film premiered at the 2002 Sundance Film Festival.
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
After a Hollywood detour that led to the career low that was Finding Forrester, Gus Van Sant turned to European cinema and his indie roots to make Gerry, a fascinating, if flawed, return to form for the maverick filmmaker. The premise is simple: two friends named Gerry go for a hike in the Western wilderness and lose their way. That existential setup becomes the springboard for a visually stunning meditation on American expansionism and the implacability of nature, among other themes. Van Sant announces his grand ambitions early in the picture, with a long, wordless sequence following the two Gerrys as they drive down a winding desert highway to a tinkling score by Arvo Part. The rest of the movie is no less audacious. Van Sant has made no secret of the influence of Hungarian filmmaker Bela Tarr on Gerry. His master stroke is to transpose Tarr's rigorous, long-take aesthetic to the American West. The result is a landscape symphony of unusual power, at once elemental and stylized. As the wandering Gerrys, Matt Damon and Casey Affleck are appropriately affectless. Though the sparse dialogue occasionally calls attention to its deliberate banality, the exchanges work for the most part, offering a stark counterpoint to the environment's grandeur. For all its formal brilliance, Gerry is not as profound as it thinks it is, suffering from a surfeit of underdeveloped ideas and an overdetermined ending. Considering its reach, however, the movie's flaws are forgivable. While it may not be a masterpiece, Gerry at least holds out hope that Van Sant may have found his way again.
New York Times - Stephen Holden
With all its quirks, Gerry seeps into your pores like the wind-whipped sand that stings the faces of these disoriented hikers.
Chicago Sun-Times - Roger Ebert

The movie is so gloriously bloody-minded, so perverse in its obstinacy, that it rises to a kind of mad purity.


The movie is so gloriously bloody-minded, so perverse in its obstinacy, that it rises to a kind of mad purity.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 5/31/2011
  • UPC: 096009771690
  • Original Release: 2002
  • Rating:

  • Source: Miramax Echo Bridge
  • Region Code: 1
  • Time: 1:43:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Casey Affleck Gerry
Matt Damon Gerry
Technical Credits
Gus Van Sant Director, Screenwriter
Casey Affleck Screenwriter
Felix Andrew Sound/Sound Designer
Matt Damon Screenwriter
Jay Hernandez Associate Producer
Arvo Part Score Composer
Harris Savides Cinematographer
Dany Wolf Asst. Director, Producer
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Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. The Road [6:30]
2. The Path [4:04]
3. "Barreling Down the Road" [7:21]
4. Conquering Thebes [5:18]
5. Scouting [6:08]
6. Dirt Mattress [12:14]
7. Mountains or Water? [5:51]
8. "Where Are You Going?" [12:09]
9. Too Many Gerrys [6:53]
10. Destitute [8:34]
11. Mirage [:30]
12. On Empty [3:16]
13. "I'm Leaving" [8:02]
14. End Credits [13:33]
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Menu

Side #1 --
   Play Movie
   Scene Selections
   Sneak Peeks
      Play All
      Miramax New Golden Age
      Blue Car
   Captions
      English for the Hearing Impaired
      None
   Special Features
      Salt Lake Van Sant
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Worse Movie Ever

    This has got to be the worst movie of all time. If I could give it no stars I would. What is interesting about two guys walking and walking and walking. I get the whole - you've got to think about it thing - but really. After a while it gets funny. I actually talked about this movie at a party and had the whole group doubled over in laughter. Don't waste your money on buying this one. You'll be glad you didn't.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Mesmerizing!

    Gus Van Sant is back, and with some serious style. After taking a long creativity snooze break with such mainstream pleasers as Good Will Hunting and Finding Forrester, and one that nobody seemed to like (Psycho), Sant was ready to return to the role of the risk taking filmmaker we all hoped he really was when he made the amazing My Own Private Idaho. 2003 brought two of the best Van Sant features in his line up, which were subsequently the two best films of the year. Gerry, Sant¿s spare experimental film starring Matt Damon and Casey Affleck, divided audiences almost squarely down the center. I fell into the camp that was mesmerized by the film¿s daring long takes and striking cinematography (the former a homage to such film masters as Andrei Tarkovsky, and the latter a beautiful and original creation of gifted cinematographer Harris Savides). So much was I intrigued by what happens to these two unnamed men (they refer to one another as ¿Gerry,¿ a made-up and affectionate nickname for a ¿royal-f--kup,¿ explained Damon), that I find it incredibly hard to understand what so many viewers found so boring about what was happening on-screen. Not only was there plenty of eye candy to get lost in with the otherworldly desert settings (which were shot in three very separate locations to create this atmosphere), but some hilarious improvised dialogue, and a downright intense build to the seemingly inevitable doom of the ¿Gerrys.¿ In addition, these characters were so completely real that I couldn¿t help but identify with them. They talked, they walked, they fell silent to their own thoughts, they cried. As Ebert pointed out in his review of the film, I can¿t imagine my getting lost in an expansive desert being much different then this. Many critics have speculated as to what the purpose of Gerry really was, and there have been many very plausible and intriguing ideas about said purpose (solidifying in my mind the success of this art piece). Some I can see, others I feel are a stretch, but nonetheless the discussion is stimulating. What exactly was the relationship of the two men? Were they friends? Lovers? The exploration of the relationship between the ¿Gerrys¿ is probably the most intriguing aspect of the film. However, as I watched Gerry, I was increasingly interested by the way the film explored time. There was a hypnotizing long-take in which Afleck and Damon walked in step with one another . Then slowly but steadily, the two men begin separating their walking patterns (this was explored again in Elephant, creating an extremely menacing effect). Other great pieces included the 8 minute descent into night, and two clock-like revolutions around the film¿s subjects. No to be missed!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews