Glen or Glenda

( 4 )

Overview

In his heart-felt cinematic debut, Edward D. Wood, Jr. himself stars under the pseudonym Daniel Davis as a young man with a dilemma: should he tell his lovely young fiancee played by real-life girlfriend Dolores Fuller about his burning desire to cross-dress? She has begun to notice articles of clothing missing from her closet; the suspense builds...what should he do? Bela Lugosi plays the omniscient narrator; note his conviction as he "pulls the strings." Amidst this unintentionally hilarious mish-mash of ...
See more details below
DVD (Full Frame)
$9.02
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$9.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (DVD)
  • All (7) from $2.85   
  • New (5) from $2.85   
  • Used (2) from $14.01   

Overview

In his heart-felt cinematic debut, Edward D. Wood, Jr. himself stars under the pseudonym Daniel Davis as a young man with a dilemma: should he tell his lovely young fiancee played by real-life girlfriend Dolores Fuller about his burning desire to cross-dress? She has begun to notice articles of clothing missing from her closet; the suspense builds...what should he do? Bela Lugosi plays the omniscient narrator; note his conviction as he "pulls the strings." Amidst this unintentionally hilarious mish-mash of melodrama, social commentary and inexplicable stock footage, there is something for every taste: countless cross dressers, hallucinatory dream sequences, sex-change surgeries, spirited cat fights, borderline-pornographic simulated sex scenes, poetic monologues, a haunted house, and a stampede of wild buffalo. Released under various titles across the country -- I Lived Two Lives, I Changed My Sex -- this fiasco bombed across the board but managed to gain Wood enough notoriety in the "B"-movie world to launch a career that is today the stuff of legend. Hailed by most critics as the worst film of all time, Wood nearly matched his first effort with such atrocities as Bride of the Monster, Night of the Ghouls, the infamous Plan 9 from Outer Space, and, perhaps the world's first topless horror film, Orgy of the Dead. Although few may count Wood among the best American cinema has to offer, Glen or Glenda certainly places him among its most memorable.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Andrea LeVasseur
In 1953, George Jorgensen had an operation to become Christine Jorgenson, in what would become the first largely publicized sex-change operation. This sensational story in the headlines interested producer George Weiss, which made it possible for the little-known director Edward D. Wood Jr. to make his first feature. As a married heterosexual and practicing cross-dresser, Wood wanted to make an intensely personal film dealing with tolerance for his lifestyle, starring himself in a cashmere sweater. For very little money and a shooting schedule of less than two weeks, Glen or Glenda? was hardly seen by anyone outside the budding exploitation circuit at the time of its release. Using a construction of flashbacks as told through rambling pseudoscience, the movie feels like an educational film strip, albeit a poorly constructed and incomprehensible one. A showcase of Wood's infamous ineptitude, the personal stories of two transvestites are spoken with ridiculous dialogue, terrible acting, and interspersed with irrelevant stock footage. Every so often, a drug-addicted Bela Lugosi would appear with some strange and pointless narration. For all the fun to be had by the silly inconsistencies, Glen or Glenda? is also increasingly dull. It may be memorable as one of worst movies ever made, but its content is not very exciting compared to the horror and sci-fi travesties of Wood's later work.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/12/2012
  • UPC: 844503000804
  • Original Release: 1953
  • Rating:

  • Source: Legend Films
  • Presentation: Full Frame
  • Language: English
  • Time: 2:10:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 49,556

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Bela Lugosi Scientist
Daniel Davis [Edward D. Wood, Jr.] Glen/Glenda
Dolores Fuller Barbara
Lyle Talbot Police Inspector Warren
Tommy Haynes Alan/Ann
Timothy Farrell Dr. Alton
Conrad Brooks
George G. Weiss
Donald Woods
Charles Crafts Johnny
Connie Brooks Banker
Technical Credits
Edward D. Wood Jr. Director, Screenwriter
Susan Olney Executive Producer
Barry Sandrew Executive Producer
Bud Schelling Editor
Harry Thomas Makeup
William C. Thompson Cinematographer
George G. Weiss Producer
Ben Winkler Sound/Sound Designer
Read More Show Less

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Glen or Glenda?
1. A New Life Has Begun [10:57]
2. The Story Has Begun [10:48]
3. "He Wears All My Clothes!" [13:30]
4. "Bevare!" [14:10]
5. Coming Out [13:41]
6. Dr. Knows Best [5:11]
1. A New Life Has Begun [10:57]
2. The Story Has Begun [10:48]
3. "He Wears All My Clothes!" [13:30]
4. "Bevare!" [14:10]
5. Coming Out [13:41]
6. Dr. Knows Best [5:11]
Read More Show Less

Menu

Disc #1 -- Glen or Glenda?
   Play Color
      Scenes
   Play B&W
      Scenes
   Trailers
      Glen or Glenda
      "The House on Haunted Hill"
      "The Little Shop of Horrors"
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    You gotta see it to believe it!

    It's not my favorite Ed Wood movie--that would be PLAN NINE. But GLEN OR GLENDA is definitely worth seeing...a whole bunch of times. It's got Bela Lugosi as 'God', who also doubles as one of the movie's TWO narrators, and a higher percentage of stock footage than any other picture I can think of. It also pretty impressive acting performance by Ed Wood himself, who actually makes you believe he wants to wear women's clothing. Oh, that right! He really DID want to wear women's clothing, so maybe it's not THAT impressive after all. But still, the sight of Ed, all dolled up in a skirt, heels and an angora sweater is really an indelible movie moment you won't want to cheat yourself out of.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Jaw-droppingly Good-Bad *and* Tedious

    I read somewhere that this film ''runs only an hour but it feels like three.'' Despite that indisputable fact, it's still highly entertaining. Two stories in one, it's about a man who secretly dresses like a woman and wants to tell his fiance. The other is about a serviceman who wants to become a woman via surgery. The dialogue is outrageously stilted and nonsensical, and some of the surreal dream sequence borders on S&M porn. But just that shot of Ed Wood Jr. passing by a woman's dress shop (shown over and over and over) with deep longing in his eyes is well worth the viewing investment.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Tim Burton Couldn't Have Done It Better ...

    If you are looking for a movie biopic of the charismatic enigma that was Edward D. Wood Jr, then look no further. This is Ed's life, thinly veiled as an exploitation film cashing in on sex change headlines. Ed wrestled with transvestism and with his own lifestyle growing up. When he had a chance to make a movie, any movie, he twisted and turned the plot to essentially be two sties - one being the sex change shmaltz he was obligated to discuss, and two being his own life story with him as Glen. He wrote, dirested and starred in it because it was HIS LIFE he was putting onto the screen. Tim Burton's film is entertaining and inspirational but for a TRUE, honest, heartfelt look at who Wood REALLY was, all you need is to look at Glen or Glenda and think of the savior of bad films and Woodites (Ed Wood-followers) everywhere, Mr. Edward D. Wood Jr!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews