Go West

Overview

The Marx Bros.' Go West was on the drawing boards as early as 1936, when MGM executive Irving Thalberg commissioned Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby to come up with a script in which the Marx Boys get involved with a rodeo. The project was shelved in favor of A Day at the Races, then revived in late 1939, two years after Laurel & Hardy's Way Out West proved the commercial viability of comedy westerns. By this time, Kalmar and Ruby were no longer involved, and the script became virtually the sole responsiblity of ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (VHS)
  • All (1) from $1.99   
  • Used (1) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(62)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Good

Ships from: Lexington, KY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

The Marx Bros.' Go West was on the drawing boards as early as 1936, when MGM executive Irving Thalberg commissioned Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby to come up with a script in which the Marx Boys get involved with a rodeo. The project was shelved in favor of A Day at the Races, then revived in late 1939, two years after Laurel & Hardy's Way Out West proved the commercial viability of comedy westerns. By this time, Kalmar and Ruby were no longer involved, and the script became virtually the sole responsiblity of Irving Brecher, who'd previously penned the disappointing Marx vehicle At the Circus. If Go West is an improvement over Circus, it is probably because the Marxes were permitted to try out their material on tour before a variety of live audiences. Set in 1870, the story begins as S. Quentin Quayle Groucho Marx tries to raise enough money for a train ticket to the West. He spots a couple of likely pigeons, prospectors Rusty Harpo Marx and Joe Chico Marx, and attempts to sucker them out of the required $500. In what turns out to be the film's funniest scene, Rusty and Joe turn the tables on Quayle, divesting him of everything he owns -- including his trousers. The plot then rears its ugly head as villains Beecher Walter Woolf King and Baxter Robert H. Barrat scheme to wrest a lucrative railroad contract from hero Terry Turner John Carroll. Rusty and Joe makes things easy for the bad guys by stupidly signing over a valuable gold-mine deed which they were supposed to deliver to heroine Eve Wilson Diana Lewis. With the help of Quayle, Rusty and Joe try to recover the deed, only to be sidetracked by a bevy of dance-hall girls. After several middling complications, the film boils down to a race between heroes and villains to register their bids and win the railroad contract. This requires Quayle, Rusty and Joe to keep a locomotive in commission by chopping up the passenger cars for fuel, one of several Keatonesque sight gags packed into the film's hilarious finale. The opening and closing scenes of Go West are so good that one is willing to forgive and forget the dull romantic subplot and the misfire gags in the midsection.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
"Go west" may have been good advice for all those young men Horace Greeley was counseling, but the Marx Brothers should perhaps have thought twice about it. Not that Go West is a bad film, as some of its sequences are quite good, but it's not a film that was really worth the talents of the boys. One of the problems is that the Marxes work best in a totally artificial studio environment; when they're shot on an actual city street, there's something a little odd about them, and when they're shot in an actual Western exterior, it's incredibly distracting. Of greater importance, the creators of the film didn't really find a way of letting the boys subvert their setting. In spite of all their efforts and their total involvement in the plot of the film, they don't really seem to be taking the characteristics of Western films and exposing the silliness underneath those characteristics. Fortunately, the film does provide a number of routines -- the initial meeting between Groucho, Harpo, and Chico; the stagecoach sequence; some of the safecracking bit; and most of the climactic train race -- that give the trio a chance to show off their comic chops. Margaret Dumont is unfortunately missing from Go West, but June MacCloy's deep-voiced chorus girl is a great deal of fun, and helps make up for the bland performances of John Carroll and Diana Lewis, and the so-so villainy of Robert H. Barrat and Walter Woolf King.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/27/1993
  • UPC: 027616008534
  • Original Release: 1940
  • Source: Mgm (Warner)
  • Format: VHS

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Groucho Marx S. Quentin Quade
Harpo Marx Rusty Panello
Chico Marx Joseph Panello
John Carroll Terry Turner
Diana Lewis Eve Wilson
Walter Woolf King Mr. Beecher
Robert H. Barrat Red Baxter
June MacCloy Lulubelle
George Lessey Railroad President
Clem Bevans Official
Lee Bowman
Arthur Houseman Drunk
Marx Brothers
Joe Yule Bartender
Iris Adrian
Edward Gargan
Mitchell Lewis Halfbreed
Tully Marshall Dan Wilson
Technical Credits
Edward N. Buzzell Director
George Bassman Score Composer
Irving Brecher Screenwriter
Jack Cummings Producer
Roger Edens Score Composer
Cedric Gibbons Art Director
Stanley Rogers Art Director
Blanche Sewell Editor
Leonard Smith Cinematographer
George Stoll Musical Direction/Supervision
Edwin B. Willis Set Decoration/Design
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously