Gone with the Wind

Gone with the Wind

4.3 116
Director: Victor Fleming

Cast: Victor Fleming, Vivien Leigh, Clark Gable, Leslie Howard


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Gone With the Wind boils down to a story about a spoiled Southern girl's hopeless love for a married man. Producer David O. Selznick managed to expand this concept, and Margaret Mitchell's best-selling novel, into nearly four hours' worth of screen time, on a then-astronomical 3.7-million-dollar budget, creating what would become one of the most beloved movies…  See more details below


Gone With the Wind boils down to a story about a spoiled Southern girl's hopeless love for a married man. Producer David O. Selznick managed to expand this concept, and Margaret Mitchell's best-selling novel, into nearly four hours' worth of screen time, on a then-astronomical 3.7-million-dollar budget, creating what would become one of the most beloved movies of all time. Gone With the Wind opens in April of 1861, at the palatial Southern estate of Tara, where Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh) hears that her casual beau Ashley Wilkes (Leslie Howard) plans to marry "mealy mouthed" Melanie Hamilton (Olivia de Havilland). Despite warnings from her father (Thomas Mitchell) and her faithful servant Mammy (Hattie McDaniel), Scarlett intends to throw herself at Ashley at an upcoming barbecue at Twelve Oaks. Alone with Ashley, she goes into a fit of histrionics, all of which is witnessed by roguish Rhett Butler (Clark Gable), the black sheep of a wealthy Charleston family, who is instantly fascinated by the feisty, thoroughly self-centered Scarlett: "We're bad lots, both of us." The movie's famous action continues from the burning of Atlanta (actually the destruction of a huge wall left over from King Kong) through the now-classic closing line, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn." Holding its own against stiff competition (many consider 1939 to be the greatest year of the classical Hollywood studios), Gone With the Wind won ten Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Actress (Vivien Leigh), and Best Supporting Actress (Hattie McDaniel, the first African-American to win an Oscar). The film grossed nearly 192 million dollars, assuring that, just as he predicted, Selznick's epitaph would be "The Man Who Made Gone With the Wind."

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Kryssa Schemmerling
This sweeping melodrama based on Margaret Mitchell's bestselling Civil War epic defined the term "Hollywood blockbuster." A massive box-office hit that cleaned up at the 1939 Oscars, winning every major awards, including Best Picture, Gone With the Wind has maintained an unshakable hold on the hearts of moviegoers everywhere. Everything about the making of this American classic is legendary -- not least, producer David O. Selznick's highly publicized search to find the perfect star for the coveted leading role. Selznick finally found his Scarlett in British actress Vivien Leigh, brilliant as the indomitable southern belle determined to rebuild her family's fortune after it is destroyed by Sherman's army. Matinee idol Clark Gable costarred as the charming scoundrel Rhett Butler, making his parting line to Scarlett -- "Frankly my dear, I don't give a damn" -- among the most famous in movie history. Scarlett and Rhett's doomed romance unfolds against a backdrop of truly spectacular set pieces, among them the unforgettable burning of Atlanta. Shot in vibrant three-strip Technicolor, Gone With the Wind is Hollywood filmmaking at its grandest.
All Movie Guide - Lucia Bozzola
As epic as the 1,000-plus-page Margaret Mitchell bestseller on which it was based, David O. Selznick's production of Gone With the Wind (1939) went through three directors, a well-publicized search for Scarlett O'Hara, and a then-enormous four-million-dollar budget, resulting in one of the all-time highest-grossing movies. Sparing no expense on sets and costumes, Selznick aimed to produce the ultimate Technicolor blockbuster, faithfully adapting the book's Civil War era travails of Southern belle Scarlett and her roguish match, Rhett Butler. While the film is grand in scale (and length), its cast, especially relative unknown Vivien Leigh as Scarlett and MGM king Clark Gable as Rhett, made the narrative as engrossing as the spectacular recreation of the burning of Atlanta (in which old sets were torched). Premiering first in Atlanta, Gone With the Wind delivered on the promise of the hype, breaking box-office records. Earning an unprecedented 13 Oscar nominations, Gone With the Wind won eight statuettes and two special awards, taking Best Picture in Hollywood's "miraculous" year, as well as Best Director for Victor Fleming, and Best Actress for Vivien Leigh. Best Supporting Actress Hattie McDaniel became the first African-American actor to win an Oscar. Perennially popular, Gone With the Wind inspired the 1994 sequel Scarlett.

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Product Details

Release Date:
Original Release:
Warner Home Video

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Vivien Leigh Scarlett O'Hara
Clark Gable Rhett Butler
Leslie Howard Ashley Wilkes
Olivia de Havilland Melanie Hamilton
Hattie McDaniel Mammy
Thomas Mitchell Gerald O'Hara
Oscar Polk Pork
Barbara O'Neil Ellen, his wife
Fred Crane Brent Tarleton
Victor Jory Jonas Wilkerson
Evelyn Keyes Suellen O'Hara
George Reeves Stuart Tarleton
Ann Rutherford Careen O'Hara
Butterfly McQueen Prissy
Howard Hickman John Wilkes [At Twelve Oaks]
Everett Brown Big Sam, the foreman
Alicia Rhett India, his daughter
Zack Williams Elijah
Rand Brooks Charles Hamilton
Carroll Nye Frank Kennedy
Marcella Martin Cathleen Calvert
Laura Hope Crews Aunt "Pittypat" Hamilton
Harry Davenport Dr. Meade [At The Bazaar In Atlanta]
Leona Roberts Mrs. Caroline Meade
Jane Darwell Dolly Merriwether [At The Bazaar In Atlanta]
Alberto Morin René Picard
Mary Anderson Maybelle Merriwether
Terry Shero Fanny Elsing
William McClain Old Levi
Jackie Moran Phil Meade
Cliff "Ukelele Ike" Edwards Reminiscent Soldier
Ona Munson Belle Watling
Eddy Chandler The Sergeant at the hospital
George Hackathorne A wounded Soldier in pain (uncredited)
Roscoe Ates A Convalescent Soldier
John Arledge A Dying Soldier
Eric Linden An Amputation Case
Tom Tyler A Commanding Officer
William Bakewell A Mounted Officer
Lee Phelps The Bartender
Paul Hurst The Yankee Deserter
Ernest Whitman Carpetbagger's Friend [Georgia After Sherman]
William Stelling Returning Veteran [Georgia After Sherman]
Louis Jean Heydt A Hungry Soldier
Isabel Jewell Emmy Slattery
Robert Elliott Yankee Major [During Reconstruction]
George Meeker Poker-Playing Captain
Wallis Clark His Poker-Playing Captains [During Reconstruction]
Irving Bacon The Corporal
Adrian Morris A Carpetbagger Orator
J.M. Kerrigan Johnny Gallagher [During Reconstruction]
Olin Howland Yankee Businessman [During Reconstruction]
Yakima Canutt A renegade
Blue Washington The Renegade's Companion [During Reconstruction]
Ward Bond Tom, a Yankee Captain
Cammie King Bonnie Blue Butler
Mickey Kuhn Beau Wilkes
Lillian Kemble-Cooper Bonnie's Nurse [During Reconstruction]
Eddie "Rochester" Anderson Uncle Peter
Trevor Bardette [During Reconstruction]
Ralph Brooks Gentleman [At Twelve Oaks]
James Bush Gentleman [At Twelve Oaks]
Louise Carter Bandleader's Wife (uncredited)
Frank Coghlan A collapsing Soldier (uncredited)
Lester Dorr [During Reconstruction]
Frank Faylen Doctor's Aide (uncredited)
Si Jenks Yankee on Street [During Reconstruction]
Tommy Kelly Boy [Outside The Examiner Office]
Lee Murray Drummerboy (uncredited)
Marjorie Reynolds Guest at Twelve Oaks (uncredited)
Tom Seidel Guest
Harry Strang Tom's Aide (uncredited)
Emerson Treacy [During Reconstruction]
Philip Trent Gentleman, later bearded Confederate on steps at Tara
Guy Wilkerson Wounded card player (uncredited)
John Wray [During Reconstruction]

Technical Credits
Victor Fleming Director
Fred Albin Special Effects
Edward Boyle Set Decoration/Design
Jack Cosgrove Special Effects
Hobe Erwin Art Director
Frank Floyd Choreography
Louis Forbes Musical Direction/Supervision
Ernest Haller Cinematographer
Sidney Howard Screenwriter
Arthur Johns Special Effects
Hal Kern Editor
Raymond A. Klune Production Manager
Frank Maher Sound/Sound Designer
William Cameron Menzies Production Designer
James Newcom Editor
Joseph B. Platt Set Decoration/Design
Walter Plunkett Costumes/Costume Designer
Eddie Prinz Choreography
David O. Selznick Producer
Eric Stacey Asst. Director
Max Steiner Score Composer
Lyle Wheeler Art Director
Lee Zavitz Special Effects
Margaret Mitchell Source Author

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Gone with the Wind 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 116 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
that many people consider this the best movie ever made...unless you happen to be used to what comes out of Hollywood today... most of which is junk! Great story....great history....great love story...great acting.. and for it's time....extraordinary special effects....especially the burning of Atlanta. A classic that should be in any respectable video or DVD collection.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first time I saw Gone With The WInd when I was six I fell in love!!! This movie is awesome!!! Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable take my breath away every time I watch this movie!!! This flim is a abosolute MASTERPEICE!!! It will alawys be my favorite and it touches me and makes my heart menlt like chocolate everytime I see it!!! Vivien is a AWESOME Scarlett O'Hara!!! They knew what they where doing when they chose her!!! Whenever this was first seen it has been a classic and is still getting more fame as the years pass by. It has the best acting of all time!!! Clark Gable was just as an awesome character than Vivien Leigh. Every actor in this flim is just right for their role. It was the role of Scalett O'Hara that made Vivien Leigh the remembered Hollywood legend that she is today!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was one of the best movies I have ever seen!It is pretty long, but it makes you laugh and cry and keeps you hooked till the end.A story of love, passion, tragedy and it has a good historical backround.All in all it was a great movie. =)
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really liked this film...No wait, I LOVED THIS FILM and always have. Every time the opening title comes up I get goosebumps and I grin. This movie has humor, romance, sorrow, mourning, and makes you really appreciate the life that our ancestors had to live through. It touches me so much and I just can't get enough of this movie. I reccommend it to every single person out there.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Gone With the Wind is the film that is closest to my heart. It manages to move me like no other film can. From the opening credits, with its great musical scoring, I immediately become overwhelmed by what I see in front of me. I begin to get sucked into the riveting world of Scarlett and Rhett. I literally begin to live every moment of the film through Scarlett. I completely love Scarlett and Vivien Leigh's portrayal of her. Scarlett really is the star of the story and Vivien's great acting makes the film twice as good as it is. Scarlett, even with her character flaws, is truly one of my personal heroines. Watching GWTW always makes me wish I was her. I really don't know why. I guess I can attribute this to the fact that I somehow see myself in her. I could never emphasize how much I love this movie. Needless to say, it is my all-time favorite movie and I think it to be the best. If I could drag everyone I know to watch the movie in its almost 4 hour glory, I would. Watch it and for sure it will occupy a special place in your heart. :)
Guest More than 1 year ago
I feel that if you are going to write something about what is arguably considered the greatest movie ever made, one really needs to know the back ground of the subject. One "critic" by the name of Michael, writes that he does not understand why the film has never been released in wide screen format like the original theatrical version. Michael, my friend, the film was made in 1939 and there was no such thing as 70mm film. That, by the way, is what wide screen frequently is. All films of the time were shot in 35mm. What one sees on DVD is EXACTLY what Victor Fleming, the director, directed. And someone else complains about the stilted acting. Again, the film is dated 1939. That IS how film acting was done at the time. Film was still relatively new, and so when the spoken word arrived on film a scant ten years before, they used the same style of acting that was used on the New York stage at the time. I know this may sound pompous, but what I just read really irratated me. Before one critiques something, be sure you know what you are critiquing!!! Oh, one last thing, to the writer that said Clark Gable was the only one putting on a decent performance, watch it one more time. He and Leslie Howard do not even attempt to fake Southern Accents. Only Vivien Leigh and Olivia Havilland attempt them, after long and intensive coatching by David O'Selznik. "Nuff" said.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first watched this movie 4 years ago and was totally enamored. It is a classic tale of the chains that entrap us within society, as well as personal struggle in the world of money as well as love. I have seen no other movie that can encompass the emotions of people in such varying degrees as I have seen in Gone With the Wind. The actors captured their characters entirely. Not to mention the sets and costumes are perfect. This movie I think mainly due to when it was made, 1939, has a realistic approach and isn't as sugar coated as I could imagine it would be if it had been made in present day. There is definetly something to say for old movies. Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable are spectacular as the "star-crossed" Scarlett and Rhett. For anyone who has never seen this movie it is a must see, truly an American classic. If you also like to read an extremely wise purchase would be the novel by Margaret Mitchell. It happens to also top the most well written book in my mind.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved it.Really good movie.
Operafan48 More than 1 year ago
Over 70 years have passed yet Gone With The Wind remains the yardstick by which all subsequent film epics have been judged. This Super Production of 1939 was the last word in Hollywood entertainment, a sprawling, bigger than life melodrama that was first and foremost a soap opera with the American Civil War as its enormous backdrop. With a then unprecedented running time of 3 hours and 40 minutes, including intermission, the film was an overpowering emotional experience for moviegoers at the time and it continues to enthrall viewers today. It has the perfect cast, Glorious Technicolor, magnificent sets and costumes and perhaps the greatest score ever written for a movie. To top it all off, it features the most indelible romantic pairing in the history of movies : Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh. Gable Was the epitome of author Margaret Mitchell's conception of Blockade Runner Rhett Butler and Vivien Leigh, up until then a relatively unknown British actress, was Scarlett O'Hara right off the pages of Miss Mitchell's magnum opus. To this day, Vivien Leigh's performance as Scarlett is perhaps the most revered piece of movie acting by an actress in the History of Film. Acting styles may have changed drastically over the years but this remains a brilliant performance in any era. Producer David O. Selznick spent the rest of his life trying to duplicate his own masterpiece but was unsuccessful. His heavy breathing western spectacle Duel in the Sun was overripe kitsch and a late 50's remake of Hemingway's A Farewell To Arms was uninspired. His Portrait of Jennie in the late 40's came closest to an artistic achievement, a haunting romantic fantasy starring his wife Jennifer Jones. The enduring appeal of Gone With The Wind boils down to this : for nearly 4 hours the viewer is witness to life being lived, to characters experiencing the good and bad in life over a span of years, to a teeming semblance of history taking place (no matter that it's Hollywood History, the Reel thing as opposed to the Real thing). Other films have tried to duplicate its success : Lawrence of Arabia is a Thinking Man's epic, a triumph in its own right ; Ben- Hur, the 1959 remake is an enormous creation and the most moving of all biblical films; David Lean's somber Russian epic Doctor Zhivago comes close but its wintry romance pales in comparison to Rhett and Scarlett's fiery passion. All in all, Gone With The Wind is a movie monument, an indestructible artifact of Hollywood's Golden Age.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would recommend this to all Gone With The Wind fans. It is a true classic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's no wonder that this movie was selected as one of AFI's 100 Best Movies of All Time. It has all the elements of a melodrama but never sinks into gooshy sentimentality. You have a heroine who rises above her own self-absorption despite her schemes, a handsome self-confident roué who does the South proud, scrappy slaves, a saintly devoted wife, a weak too-honorable husband, fighting soldiers, a hellacious fire and great music, to boot! I never get tired of watching this film and getting involved in everyone's trials, tribulations and triumphs. Get a bucket of popcorn, prop yourself in a comfortable chair and happy watching!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first time I saw this movie I was around 9. When the movie was released on VHS I immediately purchased it. It is my ritual that I watch this movie once a year and enjoy it more everytime I watch it. This movie is a classic it can never do it any just to remake this Classic. There are no other actors that come close to any of the greats that made this movie!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Perfect everything. If you take into account when the movie was made (I fully agree with A reviewer (andrewgero) this is a masterpiece. I do admit that I have seen the movie before I have read the book and it might have made the difference (I know from my experience with other movies/books that it might ruin the movie) nevertheless - especially after having seen the movie about making the movie I am a devoted admirer of everything about this movie. Did you know that because of budget and time issues Tara - building did not exist? It was painted on the glass. That Twelve Oaks had no roof? The impressive round staircase ends in the blue. Amazing, unforgatable, gorgeous acting - like Margaret Mitchell wrote the parts for these particular actors. LOVE IT and have seen it almost 20 times!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first time I saw Gone With The Wind I was about 8 or 9. I loved it and have been a fan ever since. It encompasses so many emotions and feelings that everyone experiences. And there are so many characters that you hate and then you love, you become torn. It is my favorite book and movie. It is a story that will last forever.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is by far the best movie made in all of film history. The finest of civil war epic movies, the finest of romance films, and including the most amazing and favorite cast of all, Vivien Leigh, Clark Gable, Leslie Howard, and Olivia de Havilland. A heart breaking film, of survival, love, war, and courage. It deserved the 10 academy awards, and I LOVE Vivien Leigh in her performance, she is my favorite actress! I recommend this epic with all my heart! Amazing!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Brilliant! Gone With the Wind is an incredible movie, but I must say I was disappointed in the first DVD version they released because it had absolutely no extra features. But this one more than makes up for it - it has a superb documentary on the making of GWTW with absolutely fascinating details, biographies of Gable and Leigh (both well done!), an interview with the precious and charming Miss De Havilland, and much more! I LOVE the movie but wont bore you with the million reasons I love this movie for. but I have to say that this DVD version brings so much more to the viewing experience. You cant beat this one! Highly recommended for all film buffs, special effects fans, gable ,leigh and GWTW fans and anyone who likes a good movie.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i first saw the movie. It was amazing. For people who dont know about history, people did ACT like the way the actors played in that generation. They did an astounding job. Please dont say they are bad actors, they were just recreating the old south. i have lived in the south. well then i read the book. The movie has played it exactly like the book!! it was shocking, double plus. well except they took out some parts beacuse then the movie would be way too long!!!when i was reading the book, i actually saw parts of the movie flashing in and helped me understand fully whats going on in the novel. well scarlett ohara really is something, you may think she was all twisted in the head for not seeing rhetts love for her, but humans can be blind at moments and then finally realize things. the movie has the best actors. vivien leigh played scarlett ohara PERFECTLY!!!!! no one can do better these days!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Well, of course, I give this movie five stars. It's the moviest movie of them all, as someone said. I am still amazed at how beautiful it is. The commentary by Rudy Behlmer is dreadful. I don't know why he did what he did. There are so many fascinating storylines behind the scenes with this movie and so many books have been written about it. It would have been nice to have him offer actual commentary about the scenes, the characters, the production that could make some commentary on all that's been written. Instead, he goes actor by actor and gives their resumes, almost word for word identical to the Christopher Plummer narrated summaries found elsewhere on the set. Not to mention so many other places. The rest of the features are good, especially the little feature on the making of GWTW. I think they could have done so many other things given 2 disks for features, but those narrated by Christopher Plummer are good. It sounds as if he enjoyed the job. The Olivia de Havilland interview is a hoot, lovely in so many ways, and then there is her grande dame manner. But she adds a rich dimension to knowing the movie. And, oh, Clark.
Guest More than 1 year ago
First of all, to anyone who thinks that Gone With The Wind is not a timeless classic, then you don't truly understand the movie. I first saw GWTW when I was 6 years old, and I've always loved it. I have watched it over 100 times and read the book more than 30 times and it's always exciting. Most people my age have never even heard of it, even after they re-released it to theatres after restoring it. They would destroy it if they remade it with today's actors and special effects. Also the reason Clark Gable didn't really try for a southern accent is because Rhett Butler spent the better part of his fictional life travelling the world and people tend to lose accents. He was older than all the other characters, remember. Ashley didn't have much of an accent but then not all southerners did or still do. Vivian Leigh did an excellent job considering that she had to lose her british accent before filming. Anyone who can't see the beauty of this movie should watch it again and then read the book a few times.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Classic or contemporary, black and white or color, I love movies. And in my book, GWTW is one of the greatest movies ever made. I'd probably need ten more hands to count the number of times that I've seen it. It never fails, when Rhett asks Scarlett if she would divorce him if Ashley were free, I ALWAYS find myself wishing that she would say no and tell him how happy she is. There are other instances like this where an honest response would have brought the two together. But then this constant conflict is what makes GWTW the love story that it is. I think you can forget about Rhett and Ashley's missing southern accents. Actually, you can forget about the attempts at them (remember, Vivien Leigh was british and needed much coaching!), the movie speaks to you just as the book does. Sometimes I think better. I've read the book several times and it tells of a woman so in enamored with a man that she'll do whatever it takes to have him. However, there's another man in her life that she's inexplicably drawn to(I wonder why?!!). You can imagine or feel Scarlett's feelings when you read the book. But, I think Vivien Leigh's portrayal makes you imagine and feel plus you get a cherry on top, you also get to see Scarlett's mind at work. It was a portrayal deserving of the best actress oscar. I'm not a critic or anything this is just my opinion. I know that it may sound silly to some, but to me, Clark Gable was the ultimate Rhett Butler and Vivien Leigh was born to play Katie Scarlett O'Hara Hamilton Kennedy Butler. It's almost like Scarlett lived inside of her and that she let her out and offered her up on a hugh movie screen for everyone to see. Some may refuse the offer, I very much appreciate and kindly thank her for it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Gone with the Wind is a smart, romantic, heart- wrenching movie. Set during the Civil War in the Old South, the movies follows the selfish and headstrong Scarlett O'Hara"Leigh", a southern belle, as she transforms from a selfish rich girl to having to work to eat and finally learning somewhat of a lesson in the aftermath of the war. Over the course of this movie, Scarlett marries three different men being widowed by two of them and left by one. Rhett Butler"Gable"is her final husband, the oily southern blockade runner. As the movie progresses, sometimes dragging on at parts, Scarlett assits Melly Hamilton/Wilkes in a hospitel for the wounded, after the war. This movie was moderatly useful to history, because although it portrayed the Civil War and what life was like during the war it also tended to lean toward the more romantic side and soften the edges of the war with romance.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Gone With The Wind is no doubt a 5-star movie. My favorite characters of all were Melanie/Melly and Bonnie. For 1939, this movie is great in it's quality. The actors are all very well selected for their part.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best films if not the best film in movie history. It's all about Southern belle Scarlett O¿Hara, played to perfection by the gorgeous Vivien Leigh and the trials and tribulations she faces in love and life during the Civil War and Southern reconstruction. This excellent film also stars Clark Gable as Sgt. Rhett Butler, Leslie Howard as Ashley Wilkes, Olivia De Havilland as Melanie and Hattie McDaniel as Mammy. This film gets better with age and is able to hold the viewers' attention and keep them spellbound without letting go.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Powerful story where so many emotions are expressed through the characters. Truly a classic that everyone should see.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
the south is the south time haven't pass, same attitudes, same pride, makes you wonder if something was gained if something was learned . acting extraordinary, especial effects without equal.