Grand Slam DVD Giftset

Grand Slam DVD Giftset

3.0 1
Director: Alfred E. Green, John Sayles, Ron Shelton, Sam Wood

Cast: Alfred E. Green, John Sayles, Ron Shelton, Sam Wood

     
 
Despite its lack of production values and box-office "names," The Jackie Robinson Story is one of the best and most convincing baseball biopics ever filmed. Brooklyn Dodgers second baseman Jackie Robinson plays himself, and quite well indeed. The film traces Robinson's career from his college days, when he excelled as a track star at Pasadena College and as

Overview

Despite its lack of production values and box-office "names," The Jackie Robinson Story is one of the best and most convincing baseball biopics ever filmed. Brooklyn Dodgers second baseman Jackie Robinson plays himself, and quite well indeed. The film traces Robinson's career from his college days, when he excelled as a track star at Pasadena College and as UCLA's All-Sports record holder. Upon his graduation, Robinson tries to get a coaching job, but this is the 1940s, and most doors are closed to black athletes. After serving in the army, Robinson plays with the Negro Baseball League, where his uncanny skills attract the attention of Branch Rickey, general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers. Anxious to break down the "color line" that exists in major-league baseball, Robinson is chosen in 1946 to play for the Brooklyn farm team in Montreal. In a harrowing sequence, Rickey lets Robinson know what he's in for by bombarding him with insults and racial slurs. The manager is merely testing Robinson's ability to withstand the pressure: he wants a black ballplayer "with guts enough not to fight back." Robinson agrees to ignore all racial epithets for the first two years of his Brooklyn contract. Despite the unabashed hatred to which he is subjected during his year with Montreal, Robinson steadfastly continues to turn the other cheek, and in 1947 he graduates to the Dodgers lineup. After a slow start, Robinson justifies the faith put in him by Rickey. The Dodgers win the pennant race, and slowly but surely the ban on black players vanishes in the Big Leagues. Though a model of restraint by 1990s standards, The Jackie Robinson Story is surprisingly frank in its detailing of the racial tensions of its own era. It falters only in a couple of silly vignettes involving comic-relief ballplayer Ben Lessey. The cast is uniformly fine, including Louise Beavers as Robinson's mother, Ruby Dee as his wife Rae (Dee would later play Robinson's mother in the 1990 TV movie The Court-Martial of Jackie Robinson), Joel Fluellen as his brother Mac, Minor Watson as Branch Rickey, and best of all, Richard Lane as Montreal manager Clay Hopper.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble
Calling this box set "The Grand Slam" is at once fair and slightly inaccurate; for each of the four films here is a home run in its own right, as opposed to a base runner sent home by a blast over the fence. The set begins, in chronological order, with the 1942 classic The Pride of the Yankees, featuring Gary Cooper as ill-fated New York Yankee first baseman Lou Gehrig. Widely hailed as the greatest of the classic baseball movies, even by a few Yankee haters, it remains a simultaneously inspiring and heartrending film. More inspiring still, perhaps, is 1950's The Jackie Robinson Story, featuring Robinson himself in a stirring dramatization of his historic role in breaking Major League Baseball's color barrier. Another bit of baseball history provides the story for Eight Men Out (1988), a superb take on the 1919 "Black Sox" scandal, which erupted after several Chicago White Sox players conspired to throw the World Series. Director John Sayles -- using Eliot Asinof's definitive study of the scandal as a guide -- elicits superb performances from his ensemble, which includes John Cusack, David Strathairn, Charlie Sheen, and D. B. Sweeney, whose turn as "Shoeless" Joe Jackson just breaks your heart. Last and in no way least is Bull Durham, a modern classic that stands out as this collection's insouciant rebel, a wry romantic comedy among deeply affecting dramas. Still, its love of the game is indisputable, as it explores the romantic triangle involving two minor leaguers on the Durham Bulls (Kevin Costner and Tim Robbins) and a groupie who comes between them (Susan Sarandon). Sports-minded director Ron Shelton's most celebrated film, Bull Durham provides a bracing contemporary tonic to the historical spirits conjured in the three other films. A grand slam, indeed!
Barnes & Noble - Ed Hulse
The life and career of baseball’s "Iron Man," Lou Gehrig, are vividly dramatized in this moving 1942 biographical film, a box-office smash that earned 11 Oscar nominations and renewed respect for its star, Gary Cooper. The tall, lanky Cooper isn’t a perfect physical match for the powerfully built Gehrig, but he brings enormous dignity to the character and plays the erstwhile Yankee superstar for what he was: a quiet, modest individual who constantly strove for (and achieved) perfection in his chosen profession. Wholesome Teresa Wright is perfectly cast as Lou’s beloved Eleanor, the adoring sweetheart who kept him humble during the years of fame and remained by his side when he was crippled and eventually killed by the debilitating disease that now bears his name. Babe Ruth, the legendary Sultan of Swat, portrays himself in this stirring cinematic tribute, which takes occasional liberties with the truth but captures Gehrig’s essential nobility. Cooper’s re-creation of Lou’s memorable retirement speech ("Today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth...") is still an incredibly moving scene and (unintentionally, of course) a stern rebuke to the petulant, pampered prima donnas who dominate professional baseball today. One of the greatest films ever made about our national pastime, Pride of the Yankees celebrates a man who wasn’t just a great ballplayer but a great American as well.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/16/2004
UPC:
0027616905215
Source:
Mgm (Video & Dvd)
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[B&W, Full Frame, Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital Mono, Dolby Digital Stereo, Dolby Digital Surround, Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Time:
7:13:00

Special Features

Closed Caption; Bull Durham: Audio commentaries by Kevin Costner and Tim Robbins, and by director Ron Shelton

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Gary Cooper Lou Gehrig
Jackie Robinson Jackie Robinson
John Cusack Buck Weaver
Kevin Costner Crash Davis
Clifton James Charles Comiskey
Ruby Dee Rae Robinson
Susan Sarandon Annie Savoy
Teresa Wright Eleanor Gehrig
David Strathairn Eddie Cicotte
George Herman "Babe" Ruth Himself
Minor Watson Branch Rickey
Tim Robbins Ebby Calvin "Nuke" LaLoosh
Christopher Lloyd Bill Burns
Louise Beavers Jackie's Mother
Trey Wilson Joe "Skip" Riggins
Walter Brennan Sam Blake
Dan Duryea Hank Hanneman
John Mahoney Kid Gleason
Richard Lane Hopper
Robert Wuhl Larry Hockett
D.B. Sweeney "Shoeless" Joe Jackson
Michael Lerner Arnold Rothstein

Technical Credits
Alfred E. Green Director
John Sayles Director
Ron Shelton Director
Sam Wood Director

Scene Index

Side #1 -- Bull Durham: Widescreen/Special Features
1. Main Title/Baseball [4:17]
2. Professional Debut [4:34]
3. Crash Course [3:15]
4. Lesson #1 [5:00]
5. Crash's Beliefs [3:55]
6. Love Lesson [3:28]
7. "Think Classy" [1:46]
8. At Bat [3:55]
9. Loyalty [3:27]
10. Meat's Heat [6:04]
11. Coaching [2:37]
12. The Show [4:07]
13. Losing Streak [1:57]
14. Rain-Out [4:06]
15. Catch [3:19]
16. Annie's Garter [7:24]
17. Winning Streak [3:59]
18. Hand-Eye Coordination [2:54]
19. Stay Out! [2:51]
20. Huddle at the Mound [4:29]
21. The Wrong Guy [4:42]
22. Last Lesson [3:53]
23. Fear and Arrogance [2:35]
24. Hell of a Year [2:31]
25. Going Home [6:33]
26. Baseball Cards [3:41]
27. To Be [2:37]
28. End Credits [3:43]
Side #2 -- Bull Durham: Standard
1. Main Title/Baseball [4:09]
2. Professional Debut [4:34]
3. Crash Course [3:15]
4. Lesson #1 [5:00]
5. Crash's Beliefs [3:54]
6. Love Lesson [3:28]
7. "Think Classy" [1:45]
8. At Bat [3:55]
9. Loyalty [3:27]
10. Meat's Heat [6:04]
11. Coaching [2:37]
12. The Show [4:07]
13. Losing Streak [1:56]
14. Rain-Out [4:06]
15. Catch [3:19]
16. Annie's Garter [7:24]
17. Winning Streak [3:58]
18. Hand-Eye Coordination [2:54]
19. Stay Out! [2:51]
20. Huddle at the Mound [4:30]
21. The Wrong Guy [4:41]
22. Last Lesson [3:53]
23. Fear and Arrogance [2:35]
24. Hell of a Year [2:30]
25. Going Home [6:33]
26. Baseball Cards [3:41]
27. To Be [2:37]
28. End Credits [3:43]
Side #3 -- Eight Men Out
1. Title/Credits/Intro [13:07]
2. The Fix Is On [7:54]
3. The Camel's Back [4:21]
4. Big Money [9:19]
5. Gettin' Shoeless Joe [4:43]
6. Somethin's Fishy [6:47]
7. Games 1 & 2 [11:50]
8. Raw Deal [7:26]
9. Games 3 & 4 [5:49]
10. Squelch [7:58]
11. New Stakes [2:42]
12. Clean-Up Tom [4:05]
13. "Say It Ain't So" [5:40]
14. The Trial [6:30]
15. Final Verdict [9:28]
16. Gone Now/Credits [4:48]
Side #4 -- The Jackie Robinson Story
1. Logo/Main Title [1:25]
2. A Boy and His Dream [:39]
3. The Right Colors [2:55]
4. A Good Steady Job [2:20]
5. Sorry, Out of Order [1:29]
6. The Big Break [3:30]
7. Soul Searching [6:25]
8. Asking for Trouble [1:56]
9. The Sports Scoop [5:45]
10. Backlash [:56]
11. Baseball History [2:29]
12. No Fighting Back [1:37]
13. The Petition [2:38]
14. Team Player [4:11]
15. Rookie of the Year [:54]
16. End/Credits [3:02]
Side #5 -- The Pride of the Yankees
1. Main Title/Somebody [7:27]
2. Cruel Gag [10:20]
3. Yankees Property [6:24]
4. Mom Finds Out [6:35]
5. Tanglefoot [8:52]
6. Every Man [5:23]
7. Bells Are Ringing [12:13]
8. Real Hero [10:16]
9. New Best Girl [7:38]
10. Lou's Ladies [7:15]
11. Private Life [10:34]
12. Over the Years [4:49]
13. Slump [8:41]
14. Strike Three [3:50]
15. All the Time... [4:35]
16. Luckiest Man/Credits [3:48]

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Grand Slam DVD Giftset 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
evie-Z More than 1 year ago
I was shopping for "PRIDE OF THE YANKEES" and thought it a good buy to get this whole set since I am a big baseball fan . 'Pride of The Yankees' was as I remembered it with Gary Cooper as laid back as ever but pleasing as an actor. This movie was the best of the four. However, in 'BULL DURHAM" 'I was totally floored by the disgusting and obscene dialogue by all characters , even Susan Sarandon and the bed scenes were very distasteful and all this was unnecessary and could be done without. As a matter of fact when you see it on TV the language has been wiped clean and the bed scenes cut down and the movie is just as good. I can't imagine Cosner and Sarandon being comfortable with this. 'THE JACKIE ROBINSON STORY' was only fair with so so acting but good for its education on the history of baseball. Robinson himself plays the title role . "EIGHT MEN OUT' was a bore and too bad. The 1919 dastardly event ,when the Chicago White Sox players threw the world series ,could have been great but this was like the 'also running ' of a 40's double feature movie. I would like to see this done over with better acting and modern technology . Evie-Z