Hell to Eternity

( 1 )

Overview

The wartime drama Hell to Eternity 1960 is divided into three chronological segments and is based on the experiences of the real Guy Gabaldon played as an adult by Jeffrey Hunter, and as a boy by Richard Eyer. In the first segment, Guy is a homeless waif without many prospects when he is adopted by a Japanese-American family. He grows up just in time to be drafted into battle in World War II -- the bombing of Pearl Harbor has a particularly devastating effect on his family and their friends. After a wild last ...
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Overview

The wartime drama Hell to Eternity 1960 is divided into three chronological segments and is based on the experiences of the real Guy Gabaldon played as an adult by Jeffrey Hunter, and as a boy by Richard Eyer. In the first segment, Guy is a homeless waif without many prospects when he is adopted by a Japanese-American family. He grows up just in time to be drafted into battle in World War II -- the bombing of Pearl Harbor has a particularly devastating effect on his family and their friends. After a wild last fling with two buddies David Janssen and Vic Damone and some women, Guy heads off to war where he distinguishes himself because of his fluency in Japanese.
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Special Features

1960s war movies trailer gallery; Subtitles: English & Français (feature film only)
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/5/2007
  • UPC: 085391142119
  • Original Release: 1960
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Home Video
  • Region Code: 1
  • Aspect Ratio: Full Frame
  • Presentation: Subtitled / Full Frame
  • Time: 2:12:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 6,560

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Jeffrey Hunter Guy Gabaldon
David Janssen Bill
Vic Damone Pete
Patricia Owens Sheila
Richard Eyer Guy as a Boy
Sessue Hayakawa Gen. Matsui
John Larch Capt. Schwabe
Bill Williams Leonard
Michi Kobi Sono
George Shibata Kaz Une
Reiko Sato Famika
Richard Gardner Polaski
Bob Okazaki Papa Une
Nicky Blair Martini
Tsuru Aoki Mother Une
Miiko Taka Ester
George Takei George
Technical Credits
Phil Karlson Director
Ralph Butler Sound/Sound Designer
Gil Doud Original Story
Roland DuPree Choreography
Burnett Guffey Cinematographer
Joseph Kish Set Decoration/Design
Irving H. Levin Producer
Roy Livingston Editor
Augie Lohman Special Effects
Bob Mark Makeup
Dave Milton Art Director
Edward Morey Jr. Production Manager
Clark Paylow Asst. Director
Lester A. Sansom Associate Producer
Charles Schelling Sound/Sound Designer
Walter Roeber Schmidt Screenwriter
Ted Sherdeman Screenwriter
Leith Stevens Score Composer
George White Editor
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Hell to Eternity
   Play Movie
   Theatrical Trailer
      Play All
      Hell to Eternity (1960)
      The Dirty Dozen (1967)
      Ice Station Zebra (1968)
      Where Eagles Dare (1968)
   Languages
      Spoken Languages: English
      Subtitles: English
      Subtitles: Français
      Subtitles: Off
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    Hell to Eternity

    This story is perfect about descrimination in America in the past. The military is a perfect example of how these descriminations can be overcome. <BR/><BR/>Jeffery Hunter's character learns the language and culture of 2nd Generation Japanese whose "Homeland" attacks these Japanese Americans' real homeland, at Pearl Harbor. The movie goer sees how empathy for others plays a part for almost all of the characters and when Hunter's platoon leader, David Janson, gets killed he has to undergo a transformation of how empathy can be ignored under trying circumstances. But he overcomes this, too.<BR/><BR/>The title is perfect for the story it tells.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews