Hugo

Hugo

4.5 18
Director: Martin Scorsese

Cast: Ben Kingsley, Sacha Baron Cohen, Asa Butterfield

     
 

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Martin Scorsese's adaptation of Brian Selznick's award-winning novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret stars Asa Butterfield, as an orphan boy who lives in a Parisian train station. Sent to live with his drunken uncle after his father's death in a fire, Hugo learned how to wind the massive clocks that run throughout the station. When the uncle disappears one day, Hugo… See more details below

Overview

Martin Scorsese's adaptation of Brian Selznick's award-winning novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret stars Asa Butterfield, as an orphan boy who lives in a Parisian train station. Sent to live with his drunken uncle after his father's death in a fire, Hugo learned how to wind the massive clocks that run throughout the station. When the uncle disappears one day, Hugo decides to maintain the clocks on his own, hoping nobody will catch on to him squatting in the station. His natural aptitude for engineering leads him to steal gears, tools, and other items from a toy-shop owner who maintains a storefront in the station. Hugo needs these purloined pieces in order to rebuild a mechanical man that was left in the father's care at the museum -- the restoration was a project father and son did together. When Georges (Ben Kingsley), the old man who runs the toy stand, catches on to the thievery, he threatens to turn Hugo over to the station's lone police officer (Sacha Baron Cohen, who makes every effort to send any parentless child in the station to the orphanage. But Hugo's run-in with Georges leads to a friendship with the elderly gentleman's goddaughter, Isabelle (Chloe Grace Moretz), who unknowingly possesses the last item Hugo needs to make the mechanical man work again.

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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Perry Seibert
If you've never read Brian Selznick's award-winning children's book The Invention of Hugo Cabret, hearing the news that Martin Scorsese was going to adapt the family-friendly classic probably sounded like a terrible mistake or a bad joke -- nobody expects the man responsible for Goodfellas, The Departed, and Taxi Driver to churn out the kind of movie that we associate with fast-food tie-ins. But for those who were familiar with Selznick's wondrous celebration of cinema's early days, that announcement couldn't have been more natural or expected. Thankfully, the movie delivers on its promise. The film stars Asa Butterfield, a young actor with the kind of eyes that trigger protective and parental instincts in any viewer, as Hugo Cabret, an orphan boy who lives in a Parisian train station in the 1930s. Sent to live with his drunken uncle after his father's death in a fire, Hugo learns how to wind the massive clocks that run throughout the station. When the uncle disappears one day, Hugo decides to maintain the clocks on his own, hoping nobody will catch on to his squatting in the station. His natural aptitude for engineering leads him to steal gears, tools, and other items from a toy-shop owner who maintains a storefront in the station. Hugo needs these purloined pieces in order to rebuild a mechanical man that was left in his father's care at a nearby museum -- the restoration was a project father and son did together. When Georges (Ben Kingsley), the old man who runs the toy stand, catches on to the thievery, he threatens to turn Hugo over to the station's lone police officer (Sacha Baron Cohen, stealing every one of his scenes with a performance that recalls Peter Sellers), whose ineptitude is matched only by his desire to send any parentless child he finds in his station to the orphanage. But Hugo's run-in with Georges leads to a friendship with the elderly gentleman's goddaughter, Isabelle (Chloe Grace Moretz), who unknowingly possesses the last item Hugo needs to make the mechanical man work again. While there's a great deal of plot in Hugo, the movie is primary a sensory experience. Scorsese's artful use of 3D turns the elaborate clockworks at the station into a labyrinth that Hugo traverses with a physical abandon that's amplified both by his age and his fear of being discovered. This is one of the more tactile films you'll see -- smoke, snowflakes, and dust particles blow through the frame, enhancing the 3D effects not because they fly in your face, but because they add depth to the images. If the film were any busier it would become exhausting to look at because there's just so much to take in, but right from the start, Scorsese balances all of the visual elements perfectly with a shot that compares the layout of Paris' streets to the gears of a clock. The visual splendor, of course, isn't an end unto itself. It's employed to tell a story very close to the director's heart -- a tale about finding and caring for old movies. Georges turns out to have had quite the fascinating life before ending up at the station, and while it's unfair to spoil the surprise for those who don't know, it's reasonable to say that Hugo is Scorsese's loving tribute to the building blocks of modern cinema. It's a history lesson that allows the modern master director to re-create some of the most-memorable images from the art form's first decade, as well as craft a tender movie about creating a family. The thought of Martin Scorsese fashioning a family-friendly film released into the thick of the overstuffed Thanksgiving movie season is just as odd as David Lynch making a movie for Disney -- but The Straight Story turned out pretty well for the Eraserhead auteur and the Mouse House. Hugo is also a success, a movie that will probably appeal more to hardcore film nerds than to nine-year-olds, unless of course that youngster will grow into a movie geek. If that's the case, Hugo will be a touchstone in their cinematic development.

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Product Details

Release Date:
01/01/2013
UPC:
0883929320981
Original Release:
2011
Rating:
PG
Source:
Paramount Catalog
Presentation:
[3D]
Time:
2:06:00
Format:
3D
Sales rank:
32,004

Special Features

Disc 1 - Blu-Ray Feature Film + Special Features:; Shoot The Moon: The Making Of Hugo; The Cinemagician, Georges Méliès; Big Effects, Small Scale; The Mechanical Man At The Heart Of Hugo; Sacha Baron Cohen: Role Of A Lifetime

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Ben Kingsley Georges Méliès
Sacha Baron Cohen Station Inspector
Asa Butterfield Hugo Cabret
Chloë Grace Moretz Isabelle
Ray Winstone Uncle Claude
Emily Mortimer Lisette
Christopher Lee Monsieur Labisse
Helen McCrory Mama Jeanne
Michael Stuhlbarg Rene Tabard
Frances de la Tour Madame Emilie
Richard Griffiths Monsieur Frick
Jude Law Hugo's Father
Kevin Eldon Policeman
Gulliver McGrath Young Tabard
Shaun Aylward Street Kid
Emil Lager Django Reinhardt
Angus Barnett Theatre Manager
Edmund Kingsley Camera Technician
Max Wrottesley Train Engineer
Marco Aponte Train Engineer Assistant
Ilona Cheshire Cafe Waitress
Catherine Scorsese Child at Café
Emily Surgent Child at Café
Lily Carlson Child at Café
Frederick Warder Arabian Knight
Chrisos Lawson Arabian Knight
Tomos James Arabian Knight
Ed Sanders Young Tabard's Brother
Terence Frisch Circus Barker
Max Cane Circus Barker
Frank Bourke Gendarme
Stephen Box Gendarme
Ben Addis Salvador Dali
Robert Gill James Joyce

Technical Credits
Martin Scorsese Director,Producer
Kate Benton Makeup
David Crockett Executive Producer
Barbara de Fina Executive Producer
Christi Dembrowski Executive Producer
Johnny Depp Producer
Polly Fehily Makeup
Dante Ferretti Production Designer
Martin Foley Art Director
Mandy Gold Makeup
Tim Headington Producer
Christian Huband Art Director
Georgia Kacandes Executive Producer
Graham King Producer
Emma Tillinger Koskoff Executive Producer
Ellen Lewis Casting
John Logan Screenwriter
Rod McLean Art Director
Randall Poster Musical Direction/Supervision
Sandy Powell Costumes/Costume Designer
Robert Richardson Cinematographer
Stuart Rose Art Director
Morag Ross Makeup
Thelma Schoonmaker Editor
Howard Shore Score Composer
Luca Tranchino Art Director
Joss Williams Special Effects Supervisor

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