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Husbands
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Husbands

4.5 2
Director: John Cassavetes, Ben Gazzara, Peter Falk, Jenny Runacre

Cast: John Cassavetes, Ben Gazzara, Peter Falk, Jenny Runacre

 
John Cassavetes wrote and directed this look at three middle-aged men thrown into a midlife crisis when one of their mutual friends dies. Harry (Ben Gazzara), Archie (Peter Falk) and Gus (John Cassavetes) attend the funeral of their buddy David Rowlands (Stuart Jackson); all three are starting to feel the pressures of their advancing years, while Harry is having

Overview

John Cassavetes wrote and directed this look at three middle-aged men thrown into a midlife crisis when one of their mutual friends dies. Harry (Ben Gazzara), Archie (Peter Falk) and Gus (John Cassavetes) attend the funeral of their buddy David Rowlands (Stuart Jackson); all three are starting to feel the pressures of their advancing years, while Harry is having serious problems with his marriage. After the funeral, the three men decide that they need to get away from it all for a while, and they spend the next two days getting drunk, shooting hoops, playing cards, sleeping on the subway, and pretending that they're teenagers again. After 48 hours of irresponsibility, Archie and Gus decide that fun is fun but it's time to go home. But when Harry goes back to his wife, they have a huge argument; Harry storms out and decides to fly to England, persuading Archie and Gus to tag along. They get dressed up, visit a casino, and pick up beautiful women, but while Archie and Gus, as before, look at this as a brief vacation from their lives as loyal husbands and fathers, Harry doesn't want to go home, even though he seems more troubled by his infidelity than do his two friends. Cassavetes' first directorial project after his critical breakthrough with Faces, featuring intense, largely improvised performances by two of his most consistent collaborators, Ben Gazzara and Peter Falk, Husbands was originally released in a cut running 154 minutes, but was trimmed to 138 minutes for general release.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
Husbands is a fascinating cinematic exercise, the kind of film that infuriates some, bores many others and utterly captivates a select few. As with many John Cassavetes films, it's a "love it or hate it" experience. Its detractors can point with great justification to its flaws: the film itself is not only overlong, but many individual scenes within it are overlong -- and not by just a few seconds. The improvisational nature of the film means that it lacks narrative cohesiveness, points are made indirectly if at all, and the focus is unclear from one moment to the next. One watches the film and grows increasingly frustrated. But this seems to be exactly what Cassavetes intended. The men he is studying are themselves frustrated. They feel trapped. They want to escape their lives, and not just through a long weekend in London. Cassavetes creates a similar sense of unease in the viewer. Whether this is artistically brilliant or pretentious and sophomoric depends upon the individual viewer. But those who are able to give themselves over to Cassavetes will find Husbands immensely rewarding, an exhausting probe into the psyche of middle-aged, middle class American males circa 1970. Such viewers will leave not with insight but with comprehension of a small corner of American culture. They will also leave with a great appreciation of the acting talents of Cassavetes, Peter Falk and Ben Gazzara, whose work here is irreplaceable.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/18/2009
UPC:
0043396257641
Original Release:
1970
Rating:
PG13
Source:
Sony Pictures
Region Code:
1
Time:
2:22:00

Special Features

Closed Caption; Commentary with author Marshall Fine; The story of husbands: A tribute to John Cassavetes

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Ben Gazzara Harry
Peter Falk Archie
John Cassavetes Gus
Jenny Runacre Mary Tynan
Jenny Wright Pearl Billingham
Noelle Kao Julie
John Kullers Red
Delores Delmar The Countess
Peggy Lashbrook Diana Mallabee
Eleanor Zee Mrs. Hines
Claire Malis Stuart's wife
Lorraine McMartin Annie's mother
Edgar Franken Ed Weintraub
Sarah Felcher Sarah
Antoinette Kray "Jesus Loves Me"
Gwen van Dam "Jeannie"
John Armstrong "Happy Birthday"
Eleanor Gould "Normandy"
Joseph Boley Minister
Judith Lowry Stuart's grandmother
Joseph Hardy "Shanghai Lil"
K.C. Townsend Barmaid
Annie O'Donnell Nurse
Gena Wheeler Nurses
Alexandra Cassavetes Xan
Nick Cassavetes Nick
Frederick Draper Actor
Charles Gaines Actor
Leola Harlow Leola
David Rowlands Stuart Jackson
Reta Shaw Annie
Claire Callaway Actor

Technical Credits
John Cassavetes Director,Screenwriter
Jack Ackerman Musical Direction/Supervision
Louis Brown Costumes/Costume Designer
Tom Cornwell Editor
Rene D'Auriac Art Director
Edward Folger Asst. Director
Alan Hopkins Asst. Director
Victor J. Kemper Cinematographer
Robert Laden Makeup
Dennis L. Maitland Sound/Sound Designer
Tommie Manderson Makeup
Al Ruban Producer
Sam Shaw Producer
Peter Tanner Editor
Stanley Wilson Musical Direction/Supervision
Jack Woods Editor

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Husbands
1. Chapter 1 [13:03]
2. Chapter 2 [4:50]
3. Chapter 3 [8:09]
4. Chapter 4 [12:57]
5. Chapter 5 [10:57]
6. Chapter 6 [5:02]
7. Chapter 7 [9:12]
8. Chapter 8 [10:18]
9. Chapter 9 [17:10]
10. Chapter 10 [2:54]
11. Chapter 11 [23:00]
12. Chapter 12 [:26]

Customer Reviews

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Husbands 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Buckaroo More than 1 year ago
"Husbands" is yet another example of John Cassavetes' artistic vision of bringing real life to the audience in such a way that is truly memorable. You are not going to get the beautifully orchestrated mise en scen of a JOhn Ford picture, or the calculated but effctive approach of Woody Allen, or, Clint Eastwood's visions on family and sensibility; what you do get is raw emotion, in your face camera work, and truly gifted actors portraying their characters' feelings and emotions as they try to get on with their lives after the loss of one of their other friends. The beauty of the film is that at times it seems so unscripted and without direction at all, but that is where you see Cassavete's brilliance. I watch the film and often wish I can view the footage that was left on the cutting room floor.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago