I'll Be Seeing You

I'll Be Seeing You

5.0 1
Director: William Dieterle

Cast: Ginger Rogers, Joseph Cotten, Shirley Temple

     
 

William Dieterle's sentimental wartime romance I'll Be Seeing You (1945) never made it to laserdisc, but has arrived on DVD in a handsome-looking edition from MGM/UA (which bought up the Selznick International library, of which it was a part, in 2003). The source print has no blemishes, and after a window-boxed opening logo for Selznick, gives us a crispSee more details below

Overview

William Dieterle's sentimental wartime romance I'll Be Seeing You (1945) never made it to laserdisc, but has arrived on DVD in a handsome-looking edition from MGM/UA (which bought up the Selznick International library, of which it was a part, in 2003). The source print has no blemishes, and after a window-boxed opening logo for Selznick, gives us a crisp full-frame image that looks sharper than the movie from television showings in the '60s and early '70s. The opulence of the Selznick production style (even as practiced here, by proxy, by future MGM production chief Dore Schary) really comes to life in this high-resolution format -- the subtle elegance of even the middle-class settings, and the carefully lit sets -- but the most startling element of the movie to rise to the surface in this format is Ginger Rogers' performance. One of her most subtle portrayals, her work as a furloughed convict (guilty of a manslaughter charge that, in more recent times, might well have been dismissed, as it involved her resisting what we now call "date rape") is the kind of role that actresses yearned for, and she rises to the occasion -- presented in this way, with no visual flaws, and in optimum condition, we get to absorb her work at its best. Joseph Cotten's performance is also worth seeing, though he almost loses himself in his attempt to portray a shell-shocked veteran -- he was too subtle for his own good, by the standards of the time. One wishes that it was possible to say the disc was flawless, but that goal eludes us here. For reasons best known to themselves, MGM/UA has mastered the sound on this disc -- which is hardly overloaded with extras -- at a volume level half of what it should be. It's all clean and comes out without distortion of any kind, but why that discrepancy exists is a mystery. The 85-minute movie has been given 16 very well chosen chapters and comes with French, Spanish, and English subtitles; however, there is no trailer or other support material of any kind. It opens automatically to a simple three-selection menu offering "Play," "Chapter," and "Subtitle" selections.

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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
Some may find I'll Be Seeing You a bit overly sentimental, but it's a melodrama that's pretty darned hard to resist. Admittedly, it's manipulative and is designed to shamelessly tug at those heartstrings, but it's also undeniably effective. It also isn't without restraint; it would have been easy to go much further in the search to wring out tears and to fall into excesses that would have ruined it. Instead, Seeing's director William Dieterle (with an assist from George Cukor) lets things go just so far and no further, pulling back before it topples over the brink. Dieterle is helped enormously by his stars. Ginger Rogers is at first glance rather odd casting. Rogers generally played women who speak their minds and keep nothing back; yet here she is playing a woman with a secret that she doesn't want to share with a man with whom she is falling in love. Yet Rogers is an inspired choice, for the audience can feel how hard it is for her to keep things back, making the character's plight all the more believable. As the object of her growing affection, Joseph Cotten gives a wonderfully modulated performance that finds mountains of meaning in mere gestures. Cotten was always expert at creating an inner life for his characters, and he adds layers here that are especially effective. He also delivers his big set piece "war memory" sequence beautifully. An adolescent Shirley Temple provides lively comic relief and Spring Byington is her usual warm and lovable self. I'll Be Seeing You may be a bit too much for those who insist on total realism, but others will be drawn in by its considerable charms -- and its power.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/19/2004
UPC:
0027616903815
Original Release:
1944
Rating:
NR
Source:
Mgm (Video & Dvd)
Region Code:
1
Time:
1:25:00

Special Features

Closed Caption; [None specified]

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Ginger Rogers Mary Marshall
Joseph Cotten Zachary Morgan
Shirley Temple Barbara Marshall
Spring Byington Mrs. Marshall
Tom Tully Mr. Marshall
Chill Wills Swanson
Dare Harris Lt. Bruce
Kenny Bowers Sailor on Train
Margaret Bert Mother of Boys
Jack Carr Counterman
Robert Dudley YMCA Hotel Attendant
Gary Gray Boys Outside Theater
Eddie Hall Charlie Hartman
Joe Haworth Sailor in Coffee Shop
Olin Howland Hawker
John James Paratrooper
Bob Meredith Soldier-Father on Train
Stanley Ridges Warden
Dorothy Stone Saleslady
John Derek Lieutenant Bruce
Walter S. Baldwin Vendor

Technical Credits
William Dieterle Director
Daniele Amfitheatrof Score Composer
Sammy Fain Songwriter
Lowell J. Farrell Asst. Director
Tony Gaudio Cinematographer
Edith Head Costumes/Costume Designer
Irving Kahal Songwriter
Mark-Lee Kirk Art Director
Emile Kuri Set Decoration/Design
Charles Martin Original Story
Marion Parsonnet Screenwriter
Dore Schary Producer
Earl B. Wooden Set Decoration/Design
William H. Ziegler Editor

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Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Main Title/Shy Soldier [8:51]
2. Mentally Wounded [2:22]
3. "Welcome Home" [4:32]
4. Dreams Change [4:42]
5. The Dinner Guest [5:14]
6. Troubling First Date [5:41]
7. True Confessions [5:26]
8. Explaining Himself [6:37]
9. Merry Christmas [7:21]
10. New Year's Celebration [12:58]
11. Scary Attack [5:50]
12. "Hold On, Zack" [5:13]
13. Barbara Spills the Beans [3:15]
14. An Awkward Farewell [1:25]
15. "Please Forgive Me" [3:12]
16. Aiming at a Future [2:23]

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