Indian In The Cupboard
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Indian In The Cupboard

4.0 2
Director: Frank Oz, Hal Scardino, Litefoot, Lindsay Crouse

Cast: Frank Oz, Hal Scardino, Litefoot, Lindsay Crouse

     
 

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Many family films have received short shrift when brought out on DVD, so it's nice to see that Columbia TriStar has treated The Indian in the Cupboard so respectfully. Not only do they provide a spotless digital transfer of the thoughtful movie but they've even thrown in a couple of extras that will interest older fans of the children's film. A clean widescreen

Overview

Many family films have received short shrift when brought out on DVD, so it's nice to see that Columbia TriStar has treated The Indian in the Cupboard so respectfully. Not only do they provide a spotless digital transfer of the thoughtful movie but they've even thrown in a couple of extras that will interest older fans of the children's film. A clean widescreen anamorphic transfer is on one side of the disc and it really shows off Russell Carpenter's warm camera work. The pan and scan version of the film is on the other side of the DVD but there really isn't any compelling reason to watch it other than to see how much of the image is actually cut off of the screen. The Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround sound audio track is bright and well balanced and it also sounds fine if played through a television set instead of a stereo system. The DVD comes with a few extras but the real winner is director Frank Oz's audio commentary. This was a challenging film to make and Oz guides you through the entire production. It really is to Oz's credit that he had the team work so hard to make seamless special effects that don't distract from what is really a rather intimate story. Oz handles the moral of the picture delicately and it contains a message that many adults could still learn from.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
The second-best movie about toys coming to life released in 1995, although not by the margin one might think, The Indian in the Cupboard is one of the least pandering and most socially progressive children's films ever released. While it may lack Toy Story's sense of carefree fun, in deference to a warm multicultural message about resolution of differences and respect for heritage, it makes up for that in sheer earnestness of purpose. Frank Oz's return to children's fare after a string of adult comedies is actually very much an adult entity in its own right. Rarely has a children's movie dealt so honestly with issues of death and the consequences of violence; instead of playing it soft, Oz astutely transforms these challenging topics into unobtrusive lessons. The film may be square in spots, but they are few. Not only does veteran special effects supervisor Michael Lantieri handle the miniaturization with subtle efficiency, but Oz coaxes an absolutely true performance from doe-eyed child actor Hal Scardino as a seamless complement. Native American actor Litefoot also brings real feeling to a role that could have been one-dimensional in less skillful hands. The narrative agenda of author Lynne Reid Banks -- namely, her challenge of cultural generalizations -- is evident in even the most minute design details. For example, the Caucasian boy is named Omri, while his Asian-Indian friend goes by the WASPish name Patrick (and also refers to his friend's mother by her first name). It's a joy to watch the film move from something so apparently basic toward something so effortlessly multi-textured.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/03/2001
UPC:
0043396116429
Original Release:
1995
Rating:
PG
Source:
Sony Pictures
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Full Frame, Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital Surround]
Time:
1:37:00
Sales rank:
4,558

Special Features

Digitally mastered audio & anamorphic video; Widescreen and full-screen presentations; Audio: English [Dolby Surround], Spanish, French; Subtitles: English, Spanish, French; Director's commentary; Photo gallery; Bonus trailers; Talent files; Production notes; Scene selections; Interactive menus

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Hal Scardino Omri
Litefoot Actor
Lindsay Crouse Jane
Richard Jenkins Victor
Steve Coogan Tommy
Rishi Bhat Actor
David Keith Boone
Sakina Jaffrey Lucy
Nestor Serrano Teacher
Gia Galeano Yard Teacher

Technical Credits
Frank Oz Director
Pete Antico Stunts
Felicity Bowring Makeup
Russell Carpenter Cinematographer
Ian Crafford Editor
Randy Edelman Score Composer,Songwriter
James M. Halty Stunts
Robert Harris Executive Producer
Erin Kemp Set Decoration/Design
Kathleen Kennedy Producer
Michael Lantieri Special Effects
Frank Marshall Producer
Melissa Mathison Screenwriter
Leslie McDonald Production Designer
Michele Panelli-Venetis Asst. Director
Arthur Repola Associate Producer
Art Rochester Musical Direction/Supervision
Deborah L. Scott Costumes/Costume Designer
Margery Simkin Casting
Jane Startz Producer
Bernard Williams Executive Producer
Michelle Wright Associate Producer

Scene Index

Side #1 -- WIDESCREEN
0. Scene Selections
1. Start [3:08]
2. "Happy Birthday" [1:37]
3. Just an antique [:32]
4. The key [2:26]
5. Indian in the cupboard [4:31]
6. Vanishing American [1:43]
7. Little Bear [3:30]
8. The teepee [2:15]
9. Action figures [1:18]
10. "I've decided to stay." [2:05]
11. Outside [2:05]
12. Tommy Atkins [6:09]
13. Ready to build [2:53]
14. Distant thunder [1:13]
15. An old Mohawk [3:49]
16. Huge responsibility [4:13]
17. Patrick meets Little Bear [2:42]
18. Boone [3:07]
19. Cowboys & Indians [4:28]
20. Putting differences aside [4:06]
21. Plastic people [2:36]
22. Missing key [5:09]
23. Massacre! [2:46]
24. "He's alive." [2:26]
25. Key retrieval [3:20]
26. Tommy Atkins returns [4:59]
27. Forest walkabout [6:00]
28. Time to go home [2:35]
Side #2 -- FULL SCREEN
0. Scene Selections
1. Start [3:08]
2. "Happy Birthday" [1:37]
3. Just an antique [:32]
4. The key [2:26]
5. Indian in the cupboard [4:31]
6. Vanishing American [1:43]
7. Little Bear [3:30]
8. The teepee [2:15]
9. Action figures [1:18]
10. "I've decided to stay." [2:05]
11. Outside [2:05]
12. Tommy Atkins [6:09]
13. Ready to build [2:53]
14. Distant thunder [1:13]
15. An old Mohawk [3:49]
16. Huge responsibility [4:13]
17. Patrick meets Little Bear [2:42]
18. Boone [3:07]
19. Cowboys & Indians [4:28]
20. Putting differences aside [4:06]
21. Plastic people [2:36]
22. Missing key [5:09]
23. Massacre! [2:46]
24. "He's alive." [2:26]
25. Key retrieval [3:20]
26. Tommy Atkins returns [4:59]
27. Forest walkabout [6:00]
28. Time to go home [2:35]

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Indian In The Cupboard 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Mr_Porter More than 1 year ago
This book is fun and exiting . It is about a boy named Omri who loves to play with action figurs .He gits a cupbord for his birthday ,so he mixed the two and magic happens. I recomend this book because it is thrilling ,exiting,and fun to read , I think you would like it to.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago