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Infernal Affairs
     

Infernal Affairs

4.6 8
Director: Andrew Lau, Alan Mak

Cast: Tony Leung Chiu-Wai, Andy Lau

 

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As Infernal Affairs opens, Ming (Andy Lau of Full-time Killer) is being initiated into the criminal underworld by triad boss Sam (Eric Tsang of The Accidental Spy), who ends his speech to his young charges by wishing them success in the police department. Ming enters the police academy, where he excels, but sees his classmate, Yan (Tony Leung Chiu

Overview

As Infernal Affairs opens, Ming (Andy Lau of Full-time Killer) is being initiated into the criminal underworld by triad boss Sam (Eric Tsang of The Accidental Spy), who ends his speech to his young charges by wishing them success in the police department. Ming enters the police academy, where he excels, but sees his classmate, Yan (Tony Leung Chiu-Wai of In the Mood for Love), expelled for "breaking the rules." It turns out that Yan wasn't actually drummed out of the force, but recruited by Superintendent Wong (Anthony Wong of Hard-Boiled) as an undercover operative. Just as Ming is achieving success in the police department while secretly working for Sam, Ming is gaining Sam's trust as a triad member, while reporting to Wong. Ten years later, both men, still undercover, have grown confused about their true identities, while their bosses, Sam and Wong, wage a battle of wits against each other. Each boss learns that the other has a mole working for him, and unwittingly entrusts the mole himself to ferret out the culprit. Ming and Yan scramble to expose one another's identity in an effort to save their own skins. Infernal Affairs was co-directed by Andrew Lau (who worked as a cinematographer on several of Wong Kar-Wai's films) and Alan Mak. Renowned cinematographer Christopher Doyle served as "Visual Consultant." The film was shown at New Directors/New Films in 2003. ~ Josh Ralske, All Movie Guide

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Josh Ralske
By the standards of the typical Hong Kong police thriller, Infernal Affairs is unusually low-key and thoughtful. Beautifully shot, well acted, and tightly edited, the film is a flawed, but acceptably psychologically taut and genuinely suspenseful portrait of two violent men struggling with their own worth as they work to ingratiate themselves to those they are duty-bound to destroy. Fans of Hong Kong cinema will be happy to see a slick Andy Lau, a disheveled Tony Leung Chiu-Wai, an intrepid Anthony Wong, and a charmingly sinister Eric Tsang, all of whom are in top form. Some of the supporting players don't fare quite as well. The love interests of the two main characters are essentially window dressing, and one ex-girlfriend of Yan's (Leung) momentarily pops up at of nowhere for no discernible reason. The young actors who play Leung and Lau's characters in their early years don't look enough like them, causing a little confusion early on. In fact, the first ten minutes of the film are so elliptical that they resemble the opening of the second half of a TV mini-series, where we see scenes from the previous episode to remind us of how we got to the point where the film proper begins. From then on, things improve. There's a bit of melodrama (the music tends toward the sappy), but there's also plenty of suspense, and a few neat surprises. The film is a treat visually, and thanks in large part to the charisma of the two leads, we end up caring what happens to Yan and Ming (Lau). Infernal Affairs delivers a much needed shot in the arm for Hong Kong cinema.
Entertainment Weekly - Lisa Schwarzbaum
Dazzling psychological cat-and-mouse drama.
New York Times - Elvis Mitchell
The sophistication of the stylized minimalism here in Infernal Affairs is dazzling.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/15/2011
UPC:
0031398145721
Original Release:
2002
Rating:
R
Source:
Miramax Lionsgate
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[DTS 5.1-Channel Surround Sound, Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound]
Time:
1:41:00
Sales rank:
22,059

Special Features

The Making of Infernal Affairs; Confidential File: A Behind-the-Scenes look at Infernal Affairs; Alternate Ending; Theatrical trailer

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Tony Leung Chiu-Wai Chan Wing-yan
Andy Lau Insp. Lau Kin-ming
Anthony Wong Supt. Wong
Eric Tsang Hon Sam
Chapman To Keung
Lam Ka-tung Insp. B
Ng Ting-yip Insp. Cheung
Wan Chi-keung Officer Leung
Sammi Cheng Mary
Kelly Chen Dr. Lee Sum-yee
Edison Chen Younger Lau
Shawn Yue Younger Chan
Elva Hsiao May
Dion Lam Actor
Hui Kam-fong Actor
Tony Ho Actor
Courtney Wu Actor
Au Hin-wai Actor
Li Tin-cheung Actor
Hui On-tat Actor
Ho Wing-ling Actor
Lee Wah-chu Actor
Cheung Yuk-san Actor
Leung Chiu-yi Actor
Chaucharew Wichai Actor

Technical Credits
Andrew Lau Director,Cinematographer,Executive Producer
Alan Mak Director,Screenwriter
Pang Ching-hei Editor
Felix Chong Screenwriter
John Chong Executive Producer
Christopher Doyle Consultant/advisor
Chan Kwong-wing Score Composer
Danny Pang Editor
Lee Pik-kwan Costumes/Costume Designer
Nansun Shi Executive Producer
Kinson Tsang Sound/Sound Designer
Chan Wai-hung Asst. Director
Chin Wing-lai Sound/Sound Designer
Lai Yiu-Fai Cinematographer

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
A wondering movie in every right, amazing story, fabulous script and screenwriting, wondering acting, breathtaking soundtrack, but it will never be fully appreciated by the western audience. There are just too much that was "lost in translation".
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great movie hence Hollywood make The Departed out of this. Everything comes around quickly.
Guest More than 1 year ago
You have two guys trying to catch whoever the mole is making this a favorite for all.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This Asian film outdoes many of its Hollywood crime story counterparts on every level. The story of two moles fighting to find eachother out is action packed and exciting the entire way through. This movie is required viewing for Asian film fans.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hands-down better than anything you'll see out of Hollywood. Slick, fast-paced cat-and-mouse drama. Great directing & acting. Even better on the second viewing as you pick up more details. Good stories are all about the plot, and this one delivers!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago