Inferno

Inferno

3.0 1
Director: Dario Argento, Irene Miracle, Leigh McCloskey, Eleonora Giorgi

Cast: Dario Argento, Irene Miracle, Leigh McCloskey, Eleonora Giorgi

     
 

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A combination of alchemy, architecture, and horror, director Dario Argento's Inferno is a pulsing thriller filled with murder and supernatural mayhem. The peculiar proceedings are set into motion in both New York and Rome when two young women, Sara (Eleonora Giorgi) and Rose (Irene Miracle), find a book called The Three Mothers, a tome of alchemy written by an

Overview

A combination of alchemy, architecture, and horror, director Dario Argento's Inferno is a pulsing thriller filled with murder and supernatural mayhem. The peculiar proceedings are set into motion in both New York and Rome when two young women, Sara (Eleonora Giorgi) and Rose (Irene Miracle), find a book called The Three Mothers, a tome of alchemy written by an architect named Varelli. According to the book, Varelli built a trio of resting places for the Three Mothers, an evil trio whose identities remain at the core of the film's mystery. Rose's brother and Sara's boyfriend is Mark (Leigh McCloskey), a music student in Rome who jets to New York after Sara is murdered and Rose disappears. He follows up Rose's research on The Three Mothers and, with the help of his sister's neighbor, Elise (Daria Nicolodi), comes to the realization that the building they are in is one of Varelli's. Along the way, Mark encounters a variety of quirky characters including Elise's butler (Leopoldo Mastelloni), the building's maid (Alida Valli), a cat-hating bookseller named Kazanian (Sacha Pitoeff), and the infirm Professor Arnold (Feodor Chaliapin) and his nurse (Veronica Lazar). After a series of murders and a revelation that the butler and the maid have been plotting to steal Elise's jewels, Mark discovers a secret series of passages within the building. They lead him to its core where he finds the wheelchair-bound Professor Arnold, who explains that he is really the architect Varelli. After a violent struggle, the dying old man confesses to Mark that he is merely a servant to the Mothers. The building begins to burn out of control, but before Mark can escape, he discovers the shocking identity of the Three Mothers. ~ Patrick Legare

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Though confusingly plotted, director Dario Argento's Inferno is a stylish, scary thriller that is considered a semi-sequel to Argento's Suspiria. While Inferno does not come close to that 1977 classic, it is significant for its collaboration of two Italian masters of cinema: Argento and Mario Bava, who helped to design several great set pieces and created the transformation scene at the film's conclusion. As with most of Argento's pictures, the visuals leave the strongest impression, especially when combined with the fantastic sound effects. One great shot depicts the killer approaching the camera in the distorted reflection of a broken doorknob. Another arresting image is that of a woman's body tearing through a curtain and falling at star Leigh McCloskey's feet. The murders themselves are brutal, but beautifully shot and impossible to turn away from. Irene Miracle's killing at the hands of the faceless killer is exceptional: He pulls her across a window frame and forms a crude guillotine with the pane of glass serving as a blade. Argento's script is very strong conceptually and features a great ending, but his weaknesses lie in the logic and sequencing. Early scenes jump confusingly from New York to Rome and characters aren't always well defined. Another negative is that the cast is bland, and often appear to be onscreen simply to serve one bloody purpose: to kill or be killed. All that aside, the film as a whole maintains a strong visual impact (such as cats darting into the shadows or a striking young woman stroking a cat in McCloskey's music class) that all work to carry the film. The mystery at the film's core -- the identity of the Three Mothers -- is compelling, and Argento and Bava's collaboration to create the fiery finish does not disappoint.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/29/2011
UPC:
0827058114998
Original Release:
1980
Rating:
NR
Source:
Blue Underground
Region Code:
0
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[DTS 5.1-Channel Surround Sound]
Time:
1:46:00
Sales rank:
26,034

Special Features

Art & Alchemy - interview with star Leigh McCloskey ; Reflections of Rose - interview with star Irene Miracle ; Interview with writer/director Dario Argento and assistant director Lamberto Bava ; Theatrical trailer; Dario Argento intro

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Irene Miracle Rose Elliot
Leigh McCloskey Mark Elliot
Eleonora Giorgi Sara
Daria Nicolodi Countess Elise
Alida Valli Carol
Sacha Pitoeff Kazanian
Veronica Lazar Nurse
Gabriele Lavia Carlo
Feodor Chaliapin Varelli
Leopoldo Mastelloni Butler
Anja Pieroni Musical Student
Ryan Hilliard Shadow
Paolo Paoloni Music Teacher
Fulvio Mingozzi Cabdriver
Rodolfo Lodi Old Man
Godfrey Salmon Conductor

Technical Credits
Dario Argento Director,Original Story,Screenwriter
Romano Albani Cinematographer
Salvatore Argento Executive Producer
Claudio Argento Producer
Giuseppe Bassan Art Director
Lamberto Bava Asst. Director
Mario Bava Special Effects
Francesco Cuppini Set Decoration/Design
Keith Emerson Score Composer,Musical Arrangement
Franco Fraticelli Editor
Maurizio Garrone Set Decoration/Design
Andrew Garroni Production Manager
William Garroni Executive Producer
Massimo Lentini Costumes/Costume Designer
Pier Antonio Mecacci Makeup
Germano Natali Special Effects
Salmon Musical Arrangement

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Inferno
1. The Three Mothers / Main Titles [2:45]
2. A Letter to Mark [4:06]
3. The Cellar [5:00]
4. Underwater Room [4:54]
5. Music Class [6:17]
6. Varelli's Book [7:42]
7. Double Murder [8:41]
8. Pain in the Neck [8:04]
9. Rose's Apartment [4:37]
10. A Visit From Elise [8:11]
11. Trail of Blood [7:28]
12. Heart Problems [3:46]
13. Questioning Kazanian [3:24]
14. Death in Central Park [6:16]
15. Eyes of Fire [4:33]
16. Beneath the Floor [5:08]
17. Secret Passages [4:26]
18. The Architect [3:57]
19. Mater Tenebrarum [5:01]
20. End Credits [1:42]

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Inferno 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago