Jeff, Who Lives at Home

Jeff, Who Lives at Home

4.0 1
Director: Mark Duplass, Jay Duplass

Cast: Jason Segel, Ed Helms


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Directing brothers Jay and Mark Duplass examine fate and family in the comedy Jeff, Who Lives at Home, starring Jason Segel as the title character, a slacker who still lives with his mother. He spends the vast majority of his time smoking pot and explaining how he's waiting toSee more details below


Directing brothers Jay and Mark Duplass examine fate and family in the comedy Jeff, Who Lives at Home, starring Jason Segel as the title character, a slacker who still lives with his mother. He spends the vast majority of his time smoking pot and explaining how he's waiting to understand his own fate, using the film Signs as the model for how he takes in the world. His brother Pat (Ed Helms) is a salesman in a mid-life crisis having purchased a sweet new sports car over the objections of his wife (Judy Greer). After Jeff answers the phone and a voice demands to speak to "Kevin," the stoner believes this is the sign he's been waiting for. During the course of the day, Jeff and Pat will confront their issues with each other, while their long-suffering mother (Susan Sarandon) may find love for the first time since the death of her husband. The film played at the 2011 Toronto International Film Festival.

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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Perry Seibert
In the opening scene of the Duplass brothers' charming, low-key comedy Jeff, Who Lives at Home, the main character explains that he's based his entire slacker lifestyle on the movie Signs. He's not lazy; he's just waiting for the universe to tell him what he should be doing. The Duplass brothers treat their hero, and the premise, with such gentleness that the movie makes a pretty good case for adopting Jeff's approach; it's a Zen slacker-philosophy manifesto. Jason Segel plays Jeff, a single, jobless pot smoker who drives his mother (Susan Saranadon) crazy with his irresponsibility. During the course of one eventful day, however, Jeff will confront his estranged brother Pat (Ed Helms), help Pat try to find out if his wife Linda (Judy Greer) is cheating on him, get mugged, infuriate his mother, and grieve for his deceased father. Though Jeff is certainly a ridiculous figure to try to build an entire movie around, the Duplass brothers and their cast find a unity of tone that keeps the movie buoyant and sweet, even when the material gets dark. Segel is effortlessly charming, in large part because Jeff very rarely puts much effort into anything. He comes off like a doofus, but quickly we see he's just a sweet-natured guy in search of a little direction. Helms, playing way against type as the aggressively obnoxious Pat, makes for a great on-screen partner. The two look nothing like brothers, which strengthens the dramatic undercurrents of the script; we want this family to come together, but we're constantly reminded how hard it will be. Those two are the center of the movie to be sure, but Greer also excels in the role of Pat's wife, and Sarandon scores as the boy's frustrated mother, who ends up spending the same day trying to figure out who the identity of her secret admirer at work might be. Jeff, Who Lives at Home is another logical step forward for Jay and Mark Duplass. They made their names in the über low-budget mumblecore movement, but their 2010 film Cyrus showed a commitment to traditional narrative, as well as an ability to work with first-rate acting talents. Cyrus lingered playfully at darkness, making discomforting humor out of incest, but this film finds them on even steadier footing. They aren't making fun of their characters' problems -- the emotional undercurrents of the film are sad -- but the laughs come from Jeff and his family's humanity, not from their weirdness. Whereas Signs wastes lots of time on crop-circles, tin-foil hats, and baby monitors to get to its moral about the importance of faith, Jeff, Who Lives at Home achieves the profundity M. Night's alien flick desperately strives for but without the same portentousness or pretentiousness. We might laugh at Jeff's obsession, but by the end we don't question the truth of what he believes -- even when we're laughing at him.

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Product Details

Release Date:
Original Release:
Paramount Catalog
[Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Sales rank:

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Jason Segel Jeff
Ed Helms Pat
Susan Sarandon Sharon
Judy Greer Linda
Rae Dawn Chong Carol
Steve Zissis Steve
Evan Ross Kevin
Benjamin Bickham TV Pitchman
Lee Nguyen Clerk
Tim J. Smith Guard
Ernest James Guard
David Kency Teammate
Raion Hill Thug
Zac Cino Gil
Lance E. Nichols Elderly Man,Phone (O.S.)
Carol Sutton Elderly Woman
Joe Chrest Paul
Katie Aselton Hostess
J.D. Evermore Waiter
John Neisler Kevin Kandy Employee
Matt Malloy Barry
Ian Hoch Bartender
Robert Larriviere Manager
Jesse Moore Taxi Driver
Scott Whitehurst Teen Driver
Wally Crowder Fisherman
Carol Wells Younger Girl
Savanna Kinchen Older Girl
Eddie Matthews Father
Jennifer Lafleur TV Announcer
Deneen D. Tyler Woman Calling the Police
Randall Kamm Field Reporter

Technical Credits
Mark Duplass Director,Screenwriter
Jay Duplass Director,Screenwriter
Theo Alexopoulos Animator
Michael Andrews Score Composer
Marilyn Carbone Makeup
Jay Deuby Editor
Cas Donovan Asst. Director
Rickley W. Dumm Sound Editor
Richard Dwan Sound Editor
Helen Estabrook Executive Producer
Lianne Halfon Producer
Stephanie Langhoff Associate Producer
Trevor Metz Sound Editor
Jill Rachel Morris Co-producer
Steven Rales Executive Producer
Jason Reitman Producer
Robert Sharman Sound Mixer
Jas Shelton Cinematographer
Russell Smith Producer
Chris Spellman Production Designer

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