Jeremiah Johnson

( 9 )

Overview

Years before Kevin Costner danced with wolves, Robert Redford headed to the mountains to escape civilization in Sydney Pollack's wilderness western. Around 1850, ex-soldier Johnson Redford decides that he would rather live alone as a mountain man in Colorado than deal with society's constraints. After a series of setbacks, he meets grizzled mountain veteran Bear Claws Will Geer, who teaches him how to survive. Jeremiah strives to live as peaceably as possible in the rugged environment, trading with the native ...
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Overview

Years before Kevin Costner danced with wolves, Robert Redford headed to the mountains to escape civilization in Sydney Pollack's wilderness western. Around 1850, ex-soldier Johnson Redford decides that he would rather live alone as a mountain man in Colorado than deal with society's constraints. After a series of setbacks, he meets grizzled mountain veteran Bear Claws Will Geer, who teaches him how to survive. Jeremiah strives to live as peaceably as possible in the rugged environment, trading with the native Crow tribe, adopting a boy Josh Albee after his family is massacred, and even marrying the daughter Delle Bolton of a Flathead chief in order to avoid confrontation. He settles into a mountain home with his family, but the U.S. cavalry, complete with a puritanical Reverend, interrupt the idyll to compel Jeremiah to lead them over the mountains and through a Crow burial ground to rescue white settlers. After the Crow kill his family in retaliation, Jeremiah's frenzied moment of payback precipitates a long-running vendetta, turning him into a legendary Indian killer at the expense of his original ideals, on the way to a final moment of grace. Spectacularly shot on location in Utah, the film captures both the appeal and the challenge of the landscape that Jeremiah chooses over civilization. With an unglamorous performance by Redford and a story that questioned white colonialism while mythologizing the man of nature, Jeremiah Johnson appealed to its 1972 audience and became one of the biggest hits of the year. Wavering between heroicizing Jeremiah for surviving and damning him for killing, Jeremiah Johnson took its place among the Vietnam-era cycle of critical westerns, like Arthur Penn's Little Big Man 1970 and Robert Altman's McCabe and Mrs. Miller 1971, that condemned civilization for corrupting the wilderness and preventing individuals from going pacifistically native.
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Special Features

Commentary by director Sidney Pollock, writer John Millius and actor Robert Redford; The saga of Jeremiah Johnson featurette; Theatrical trailer
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Three years and four failures after Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Jeremiah Johnson was the hit that Robert Redford needed. It had a man-against-society edge that would be a hallmark of many Redford pictures, including Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here, Three Days of the Condor, and The Electric Horseman. In the context of early-1970s American culture, the film's environmental, anti-establishment, Henry David Thoreau-inspired message obviously struck a chord with audiences. Redford and director Sydney Pollack had worked together once before, on the woeful Tennessee Williams adaptation This Property is Condemned, but Johnson and the majority of their further collaborations would become successes (The Way We Were, Out of Africa). Pollack mortgaged his home to complete the film, which ran over-budget due to the extensive location shooting in Utah's Zion National Park. The mountain areas are wonderfully shot by cinematographer Duke Callaghan.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 5/1/2012
  • UPC: 883929225446
  • Original Release: 1972
  • Source: Warner Home Video
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:56:00
  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Sales rank: 4,957

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Robert Redford Jeremiah Johnson
Will Geer Bear Claws
Stefan Gierasch Del Gue
Delle Bolton Swan
Allyn Ann McLerie Crazy Woman
Josh Albee Caleb
Charles Tyner Robidoux
Joaquin Martinez Paints His Shirt Red
Matt Clark Qualen
Harry Morgan
Richard Angarola Lebeaux
Paul Benedict Reverend
Jack Colvin Lieutenant Mulvey
Technical Credits
Sydney Pollack Director
Edward Anhalt Screenwriter
Andrew Callaghan Cinematographer
Duke Callaghan Cinematographer
Ken Chase Makeup
Edward S. Haworth Production Designer
Kenneth Lee Consultant/advisor
Gary D. Liddiard Makeup
Tim McIntire Score Composer
John Milius Screenwriter
Mike Moder Producer
Ray Molyneaux Set Decoration/Design
John Rubinstein Score Composer
Thomas G. Stanford Editor
Joe Wizan Producer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    We've seen Jeremiah Johnson more than ten times. If you like realistic fiction, you'll love this. It brings up all emotions...you'll be sad, happy, angry, scared, thrilled and more.

    The scenery is breathtaking and the characters vivid. We'll watch this many more times and enjoy it just as much each time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Outstanding - An American Classic

    An oldschool classic

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Correction to time frame

    The setting for this epic tale is circa 1830, as stated at the beginning of the movie, not 1850 as stated in a previous review. By 1850 the mountain men like Johnson, Bridger and Carson were largely being replaced by settlers and trapping was virtually over in favor of buffalo hunting. Although Colorado was the territory at the time of the movie the locations cited are actually in what is now Montana (the Judith River, Musselshell River etc.) This is an epic representation of early rural americana!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Robert Redford at his coolest

    Jeremiah Johnson was the coolest Mountain Man that ever did exist or did not exist in this beautifully "escape from civilization" Western. In a time when we we were still getting reports of dead and missing GIs in Vietnam, Westerns for a time took an interesting and provocative turn against mainstream conservative society that they have served as propaganda for. This one was the most thought-provoking and entertaining by Syndney Pollack. Now, watch it Pilgrims!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The Friday night tradtition comes to DVD!

    My father and I used to watch the VHS tape of this fine film every Friday night for a number of years. He absolutely loves this movie and I can't say that I blame him. When my first son is born I will name him Kaleb as it "Is a name I have long admired" because my father won't let me name him after himself.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The Life of a Mountain Man

    Few western genres have adequately portrayed what drove people to become pioneers or trappers and what life was really like for them. This movie shows exactly what life was like for those brave trappers and early pioneers who decided to make the great move West. Redford plays a soldier who is fed up with the false trappings of civilized life; he decides to become a mountain man and move west. Brilliant cinematography captures the brutal elements of the untamed wilderness. The folk music adds to the flavor of the movie. This movie is a masterpiece and stands in its own league. It has no equal to compare with. If you like down to earth movies about the real West, this is definitely a movie to own.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews