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Killing Emmett Young
     

Killing Emmett Young

 
Issues of identity, mortality, and inner peace are all at play in this psychological thriller about a young detective's last days on earth. Former Party of Five housemate Scott Wolf plays Emmett Young, a detective whose ambition and drive are thrown up in the air when he learns that he has contracted a terminal illness, a discovery that coincides with his new

Overview

Issues of identity, mortality, and inner peace are all at play in this psychological thriller about a young detective's last days on earth. Former Party of Five housemate Scott Wolf plays Emmett Young, a detective whose ambition and drive are thrown up in the air when he learns that he has contracted a terminal illness, a discovery that coincides with his new assignment to the homicide division. As Young grapples with his impending death, a mysterious stranger by the name of Marlowe (Gabriel Byrne) appears and makes the detective an offer he's not sure he can refuse: Marlowe will have Young killed at a random time and place, saving him the agony of a slow and lingering death by disease. Young agrees, and consequently throws himself into solving the homicide case he has been assigned. Convinced that he will find fulfillment if he solves the case before his death, Young is forced to question himself when John (Tim Roth), a taciturn security guard, takes a strange interest in him, and the dying detective realizes his last days will be anything but peaceful. The feature debut of director Keith Snyder, Emmett's Mark had its world premiere at the 2002 Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema. ~ Rebecca Flint Marx

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Gabriel Byrne and Tim Roth are true to their pledges of doing big-budget films for the money so they can also do promising low-paying indies like this. First-time director/writer Keith Snyder concocts a richly detailed police procedural that never seems derivative, although little of it is truly new as Detective Young navigates public documents and tracks down hearsay to learn the identity of his unknown hitman -- and then talk him out of the job. Cinematographer Lawrence Sher and editor Caroline Ross sustain a vivid mood of quiet desperation that heightens the emotional impact. Scott Wolf, previously a TV lightweight, vanishes into his role while shouldering the load as the lead actor, supported full-spiritedly by Byrne and Roth, who do anything but phone in their performances. Clearly, the cast is motivated by the material. It's not The Usual Suspects (another Byrne indie), but it will appeal to the same potentially vast audience looking for challenging material with a twist.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/20/2009
UPC:
0852459002315
Original Release:
2002
Rating:
R
Source:
Screen Media
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
1:46:00
Sales rank:
83,728

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits

Technical Credits
Keith Snyder Director,Screenwriter

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Dying Alone [8:50]
2. Meeting Jack [7:48]
3. The Plan [7:18]
4. Finding a Suspect [9:47]
5. Breaking In [8:55]
6. A Mistake [6:57]
7. Murder Weapon [11:18]
8. Chase [12:05]
9. Phone Booth [12:00]
10. Unwanted Guest [10:49]
11. Case Solved [3:05]
12. Closing Credits [5:18]

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