Killing Fields: 30Th Anniversary

( 6 )

Overview

The Killing Fields is a romanticized adaptation of an eyewitness magazine story by New York Times correspondent Sidney Schanberg. Covering the U.S. pullout from Vietnam in 1975, Schanberg Sam Waterston relies on his Cambodian friend and translator Dith Pran Haing S. Ngor for inside information. Schanberg has an opportunity to rescue Dith Pran when the U.S. army evacuates all Cambodian citizens; instead, the reporter coerces his friend to remain behind to continue sending him news flashes. Although his family is ...
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Overview

The Killing Fields is a romanticized adaptation of an eyewitness magazine story by New York Times correspondent Sidney Schanberg. Covering the U.S. pullout from Vietnam in 1975, Schanberg Sam Waterston relies on his Cambodian friend and translator Dith Pran Haing S. Ngor for inside information. Schanberg has an opportunity to rescue Dith Pran when the U.S. army evacuates all Cambodian citizens; instead, the reporter coerces his friend to remain behind to continue sending him news flashes. Although his family is helicoptered out of Saigon a recreation of the famous TV news clip, Dith Pran stays with Schanberg on the ground. Racked with guilt, Schanberg does his best to arrange for Dith Pran's escape, but the Cambodian is captured by the dreaded Khmer Rouge. Accepting his Pulitzer Prize on behalf of Dith Pran, Schanberg vows to do right by his friend and extricate him from Cambodia. The rest of the film details Dith Pran's harrowing experiences at the hands of the Khmer Rouge, and his attempt to escape on his own. The Killing Fields won Academy Awards for Hang S. Ngor a Cambodian doctor who lived through many of the horrific events depicted herein, cinematographer Chris Menges, and editor Jim Clark; an Oscar nomination went to Roland Joffe, who made his directorial debut with this film. Spalding Gray, who played a small role in the film, later elaborated on this experiences in his one-man stage presentation Swimming to Cambodia.
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Special Features

Commentary by director Roland Joffé Theatrical trailer
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Dan Jardine
The Killing Fields is a brutally honest exploration of loyalty and fidelity during the Khmer Rouge's horrific Cambodian holocaust in the mid-1970s. Based on the true story of Dith Pran (played by non-actor Haing S. Ngor in an Oscar-winning performance), the harrowing depiction of the atrocities committed during dictator Pol Pot's bloodbath stays with the viewer long after the film has ended. Pran's desperate struggle to survive in the barbarous conditions of the "re-education camps" (the apocalyptic images in the Valley of Death are particularly potent) is ironically counterpointed with the middle-class comfort of the friend who left him behind, New York Times reporter Sydney Schanberg (Sam Waterston), whose Pulitzer Prize for his reporting from Cambodia proves pyrrhic when compared to Pran's fate. Ngor's naturalistic and empathic portrayal of his character's desperate fight for survival is the key to this film's visceral power. His remarkably expressive face combines with an almost naive faith in the power of one man to survive in such a hellhole. The film aims the finger of responsibility directly at the American government of Richard Nixon, arguing that his "secret" war in Cambodia led to Pol Pot's genocidal policies. Nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director, The Killing Fields won three, for Ngor, Chris Menges's cinematography, and Jim Clark's editing.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/7/2014
  • UPC: 883929374267
  • Original Release: 1984
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Home Video
  • Language: English
  • Time: 2:22:00
  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Sales rank: 5,899

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Sam Waterston Sydney Schanberg
Dr. Haing S. Ngor Dith Pran
John Malkovich Al Rockoff
Julian Sands Jon Swain
Craig T. Nelson Military Attache
Athol Fugard Dr. Sundesval
Spalding Gray United States consul
Bill Paterson Dr. Macantire
Jay Barney Schanberg's Father
Katherine Kragum Chey Ser Moeun
Sayo Inaba Mrs. Noaks
Mark Long Noaks
Joanna Merlin Schanberg's Sister
Graham Kennedy Dougal
Oliver Pierpaoli Titonel, Pran's Son
Edward Entero Chey Sarun
Monirak Sisowath Phat, KR Leader, 2nd Village
Ira Wheeler Ambassador Wade
David Henry France
Patrick Malahide Morgan
Nell Campbell Beth
Joan Harris TV Interviewer
Technical Credits
Roland Joffé Director
Jim Clark Editor
Fred Cramer Special Effects, Special Effects Supervisor
Tessa Davies Set Decoration/Design
Terry Forrestal Stunts
Tommie Manderson Makeup
Chris Menges Cinematographer
Judy Moorcraft Costumes/Costume Designer
Roger Murray-Leach Production Designer
Mike Oldfield Score Composer
David Puttnam Producer
Michael Roberts Camera Operator
Bruce Robinson Screenwriter
Iain Smith Associate Producer
Steve Spence Art Director
Roy Walker Production Designer
Bill Westley Asst. Director
Clive Winter Sound/Sound Designer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

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(4)

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Wonderful Movie, Poor Sound Quality

    I loved the movie. Especially because the U.S. government dissproved of talk of the Khmare Rouge and the CIA's part in it until the last several years. This movie shows the horrors of what people can do to there own people. This is a truly exelent movie. I hated the sound quality though. The first half of the movie, I couldn't hear what people were saying.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Heartwrenching

    Wow,this movie is about another sad occurance in this world.The Kmher Rouge(Red Army?)in Cambodia wage a holocaust of their own in "The Killing Fields,"and it mainly tells the story of a New York Times columnist and his buddy,a Cambodian,who are getting information and reporting on the war going on.I thought the ending was the absolute best ever!After the two friends get separated because a photograph put into a fake passport/visa to get out of the country fails, the journalist returns to the States and never stops trying to find his friend who was eventually sent to a Khmer Rouge labor camp.When they finally meet again at the end, that wonderful song by John Lennon and the Beatles comes up:"Imagine."Yes,imagine all of the world peoples living in harmony.One of my favorite sayings is:"Dare to Dream of a time when all the world will be free."Sorry,don't know who that's from.Just be kind to one another...for all of our sakes,bad karma in this world is building and taking its toll.I'm sorry I'm forcing all of my political views on you review-reading people, I'm just a concerned citizen is all!no hard feelings?=)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Disturbing

    One of the most disturbing movies I have ever watched. It certainly captures one of the most brutal regimes in human history and the heroism of Dith Pran. Even the original score of the movie is jarring.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    an honest portrayl of the horrors of genocide

    i saw this movie and i felt as if i was actually in cambodia at the time of the pol pot regime. Ngor was fantastic in his interpretation of dith pran.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews