La Traviata

Overview

Tenor Pl?cido Domingo and soprano Teresa Stratas star in director Franco Zeffirelli's lushly cinematic version of Verdi's opera La Traviata "The Woman Gone Astray", a story of doomed love in 1840s Paris. Violetta Stratas, who is the mistress of a wealthy baron, hosts a lavish party to celebrate her improved health after a bout with tuberculosis. There she meets Alfredo Domingo and becomes smitten with him as he, she, and the guests join in the famous "Drinking Song." Violetta leaves the baron, and she and Alfredo...
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Overview

Tenor Plácido Domingo and soprano Teresa Stratas star in director Franco Zeffirelli's lushly cinematic version of Verdi's opera La Traviata "The Woman Gone Astray", a story of doomed love in 1840s Paris. Violetta Stratas, who is the mistress of a wealthy baron, hosts a lavish party to celebrate her improved health after a bout with tuberculosis. There she meets Alfredo Domingo and becomes smitten with him as he, she, and the guests join in the famous "Drinking Song." Violetta leaves the baron, and she and Alfredo move into a secluded country villa together, where they live happily for a while. But unknown to Alfredo, his father baritone Cornell MacNeil convinces Violetta that continuing her relationship with Alfredo will prevent Alfredo's sister from making a good marriage. With great sadness, Violetta decides that she must not only break permanently with Alfredo, she must keep him at a distance by returning to the baron. Misunderstanding her motives, Alfredo goes into a jealous rage that leads to tragic consequences.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 3/1/1992
  • UPC: 096898004831
  • Original Release: 1982
  • Rating:

  • Source: Mca
  • Format: VHS

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Teresa Stratas Violetta
Plácido Domingo Alfredo
Cornell MacNeil Germont
Alan Monk Baron
Axelle Gall Flora Betvoix
Pina Cei Annina
Robert Sommer Doctor
Ricardo Oneto Marquis
Luciano Brizi Giuseppe
Tony Ammirati Messenger
Charles Antony
Maurizio Barbacini Gastone
Ferruccio Furlanetto
Richard Vernon
James Levine Conductor
Technical Credits
Franco Zeffirelli Director, Production Designer, Screenwriter
Tarak Ben Ammar Producer
Carlo Cotti Asst. Director
Ennio Guarnieri Cinematographer
Carlo Lastricati Associate Producer
James Levine Musical Direction/Supervision
Gianni Quaranta Art Director
Peter Taylor Editor
Piero Tosi Costumes/Costume Designer
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Disfigured by cuts

    This film looks beautiful and the performances by Domingo and Stratas are wonderful (although she is not in her best voice). James Levine's conducting and the playing of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra are as good as you can hear anywhere. The ballet is spectacular. But Zeffirelli cuts away at least one-fourth of the score. He (along with many other film makers who have made movies of operas) just doesn't seem to understand that a film of an opera is not an adaptation; it is a performance of that opera using a different medium. An opera is a musical composition; therefore, a film of an opera is a musical performance of a music drama. The film medium frees the visual presentation from the limitations of the stage, but the musical presentation is the essence of the opera and must not be compromised regardless of the medium. Some of Zeffirelli's cuts must infuriate any lover of opera. For example, when Giorgio departs from Violetta after she has promised to leave Alfredo, Zeffirelli cuts some of the addios, saving just a few seconds but destroying the end of the scene. If the opera is more important to you than the cinematography, you may want to buy the DVD starring Angela Gheorghiu and Frank Lopardo, conducted by the late Georg Solti.

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