Lone Survivor

Lone Survivor

4.4 7
Director: Peter Berg

Cast: Mark Wahlberg, Ben Foster, Emile Hirsch

     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Based on a true story, director Peter Berg's Lone Survivor stars Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch, Ben Foster, and Emile Hirsch as four Navy SEALs whose sensitive mission into the Afghan mountains is unexpectedly compromised, leading to a fierce skirmish with a small army of Taliban soldiers. The year is 2005. In the wake of the 9/11

Overview

Based on a true story, director Peter Berg's Lone Survivor stars Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch, Ben Foster, and Emile Hirsch as four Navy SEALs whose sensitive mission into the Afghan mountains is unexpectedly compromised, leading to a fierce skirmish with a small army of Taliban soldiers. The year is 2005. In the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks, the War in Afghanistan is well under way when military intelligence learns that a senior Taliban member is hiding out in a remote village deep in the Hindu Kush mountains of the Kunar Province. Convinced that his capture or killing could turn the tide of the difficult war in favor of the United States, the Navy SEALs hatch Operation Red Wings. The goal is simple -- send a select team of soldiers to stake out the village from the surrounding mountains, and move on their target when the time is right. Under the leadership of Lieutenant Michael Murphy (Kitsch), Marcus Luttrell (Wahlberg), Matt Axelson (Foster), and Danny Dietz (Hirsch) reach their checkpoint, and quickly realize that another nearby hill will provide a better vantage spot. Shortly after arriving at that new location and getting a positive ID on their target, however, the soldiers are caught off guard by three wandering shepherds, including a young boy. Ultimately, a heated vote over what to do with the captured shepherds leads Lt. Murphy to decide that the best course of action is to abide by the rules of engagement, meaning that the soldiers will abort the mission, release the captives, and retreat to their extraction point. Shortly after the shepherds are set free, however, the four SEALs find themselves surrounded by dozens of Taliban soldiers, and engaged in a fierce gunfight that -- with the aid of some truly brave villagers -- only one of them will make it out of.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jason Buchanan
The true story presented in director Peter Berg's Lone Survivor is a remarkable one that, in addition to exploring the bond of brotherhood that connects soldiers in the heat of combat, also serves as a reminder that heroes come in many forms. With a talented cast that includes Mark Wahlberg, Emile Hirsch, Ben Foster, and Taylor Kitsch, Berg's adaptation of Marcus Luttrell's New York Times best-seller succeeds in placing the viewer right in the action of a mission gone awry, though swelling military snare drums and overly dramatized death scenes hint that this version of the story may be thinly disguised jingoistic propaganda rather than a sincere attempt to tell a genuinely moving tale of survival against all odds. The year is 2005. In the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks, the Afghanistan War is well under way when military intelligence learns that a senior Taliban member is hiding out in a remote village deep in the Hindu Kush mountains of the Kunar province. Convinced that his capture or killing could turn the tide of the difficult war in favor of the United States, the Navy hatches Operation Red Wings. The goal is simple: Send a select team of SEALs to stake out the village from the surrounding mountains, and move on their target when the time is right. Under the leadership of Lt. Michael Murphy (Kitsch), Marcus Luttrell (Wahlberg), Matt Axelson (Foster), and Danny Dietz (Hirsch) reach their checkpoint, and quickly realized that another nearby hill will provide a better vantage point. But shortly after arriving at the new location and getting a positive ID on their target, the soldiers are caught off guard by three wandering shepherds, one of them a young boy. Ultimately, a heated vote over what to do with the captured shepherds leads Lt. Murphy to decide that the best course of action is to abide by the rules of engagement, meaning that the soldiers will abort the mission, release the captives, and retreat to their extraction point. Shortly after the shepherds are set free, however, the SEALs find themselves surrounded by dozens of Taliban soldiers, and engage in a fierce gunfight that -- with the aid of some truly brave villagers -- only Luttrell will survive. A labor of love for director Berg (who agreed to make Battleship for Universal Pictures before moving on to this more personal project), Lone Survivor is at once a visceral action film and an unabashed tribute to the men and women of the U.S. military. Early scenes emphasizing the fraternal bond between Navy SEALS get things off to a lighthearted start as we gradually become acquainted with the team and learn about their lives outside the military. As a screenwriter, Berg uses a number of symbols (including color swatches and Arabian horses) to show us exactly what they're risking to serve their country, while also giving us a brief crash course in military protocol. All of this serves to inject a certain amount of humanity into the doomed mission, and thanks to his lead actors, Berg reveals himself to be an efficient storyteller with an eye for detail. Once the focus moves to the mountains and the soldiers come under fire, Berg makes the transition a smooth one by instantly immersing us in the action. But this is also the point when some viewers may start to take issue with Lone Survivor: Despite Berg's effective, workmanlike approach as a director in these key sequences, his instinctive drive to paint his protagonists as heroes begins to eclipse the almost unimaginably courageous efforts undertaken by a few brave Taliban resisters to risk not just their lives, but the lives of their families to abide by a local code of Pashtunwali -- which requires that they offer hospitality and protection to any "guest" they encounter, and states that such guests should not be surrendered to an enemy. Given the gruesome atrocities we see the Taliban inflict on the villagers early in the film, we know without question that the threat to them is very real. Sadly, the scenes in which a benevolent father and son risk certain death (not to mention the destruction of their entire village) to prevent the Taliban from decapitating Luttrell are treated like something of an afterthought to the carnage in the mountains -- which feels like a grave disservice not only because it's the most dramatically compelling aspect of the story, but because it challenges our preconceptions about foreign cultures. Even when Luttrell takes pause to thank his protectors in perhaps the movie's most moving scene, the overwhelming presence of the U.S. military undermines the poignancy on display. Given that the moment is quickly followed by a montage of the many U.S. soldiers who lost their lives during the mission in a rescue attempt gone horribly awry (and make no mistake, these soldiers do indeed deserve our respect and recognition, perhaps just not at this particular point in the film), it feels as if Berg favors flag-waving action over the genuinely compelling notion that real heroes sometimes sport turbans instead of tactical gear.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/03/2014
UPC:
0025192175886
Original Release:
2013
Rating:
R
Source:
Universal Studios
Region Code:
1
Time:
2:02:00
Sales rank:
7,554

Special Features

Bringing the story to light; The fallen heroes of Operation Red Wings

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Mark Wahlberg Marcus Luttrell
Ben Foster Matt Axelson
Emile Hirsch Danny Dietz
Taylor Kitsch Mike Murphy
Eric Bana Erik Kristensen
Alexander Ludwig Shane Patton
Ali Suliman Gulab
Yusef Azami Shah
Rich Ting James Suh
Dan Bilzerian Healy
Jerry Ferrara Hasslert
Rick Vargas Crew Chief
Scott Elrod QRF Seal
Gregory Rockwood Chinook Pilot No. 1
Ryan Kay Chinook Pilot No. 2
Patrick Griffin Chinook Co-Pilot
Josh Berry Communication SEAL
Eric Steinig SEAL Lieutenant
David Shepard CJSOTF Commander
Justin Tade CJSOTF Marine
Sterling Jones Bagram Comms Guy
Jason Riggins 50 Cal Gunner
Matthew Page Army Intel Guy
Sammy Sheik Taraq
Nicholas Patel Goat Boy
Danny Arroyo Teenage Goat Boy
Zarin Rahimi Goat Man
Rohan Chand Gulab's Young Son
Anthony McKenzie TOC Sr. Air Officer
Brian Call TOC SEAL
Ishmael Antonio Doctor
Samuel J. Cloud JAG
Peter Bici Communication SEAL Perry
Henry Penzi Villager
Robert Loerke Captain Jacoby
Kurt Carlson Captain Lovas
Daniel Fulcoly Lt. Andrews
Michael Herrmann Wallace
Paul Craig "EOD" Paul
Zabiullah Mirzai Zabi
John Hocker Hocker
Robert Doudell Village Elder
Edmund Blanchet PJ No. 1
Jim Cusic PJ No. 2

Technical Credits
Peter Berg Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Braden Aftergood Executive Producer
Brandt Andersen Executive Producer
Sarah Aubrey Producer
Derrick Ballard Set Decoration/Design
Howard Berger Makeup Special Effects
John Brace Casting
David Brownlow Sound Mixer
Remington Chase Executive Producer
Stephen Cooper Art Director
Mark Damon Executive Producer
Tom Duffield Production Designer
KNB EFX Makeup Special Effects
Randall Emmett Producer
Cristina Falcon Animator
Simon Fawcett Executive Producer
Louis G. Friedman Executive Producer
George Furla Executive Producer
Akiva Goldsman Producer
Lindsay Greitzer Associate Producer
Vitaly Grigoriants Producer
Brandon Grimes Co-producer
Eric Heffron Asst. Director,Co-producer
Norton Herrick Producer
Petra Holtorf-Stratton Co-producer
Harry Humphries Associate Producer
Industrial Light & Magic Animator
Steve Jablonsky Score Composer
Stephen Levinson Producer
Linda Lowy Casting
Stepan Martirosyan Executive Producer
Gregory Nicotero Makeup Special Effects
Colby Parker Editor
Dino Parks Cinematographer
Jeff Rice Executive Producer
Steven Saxton Executive Producer
Tobias A. Schliesser Cinematographer
Lauren Selig Executive Producer
Adi Shankar Executive Producer
Jason Shuman Executive Producer
Spencer Silna Executive Producer
Bryan Snodgrass Asst. Director
Barry Spikings Producer
Amy Stofsky Costumes/Costume Designer
Bruno Van Zeebroeck Special Effects Supervisor
Mark Wahlberg Producer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Lone Survivor
1. Scene 1
2. Scene 2
3. Scene 3
4. Scene 4
5. Scene 5
6. Scene 6
7. Scene 7
8. Scene 8
9. Scene 9
10. Scene 10
11. Scene 11
12. Scene 12
13. Scene 13
14. Scene 14
15. Scene 15
16. Scene 16
17. Scene 17
18. Scene 18
19. Scene 19
20. Scene 20

Videos

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Lone Survivor 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Coach_Al-1969 More than 1 year ago
A visceral experience. I found myself not breathing for periods of time. A must have for any collection.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought the movie Lone Survivor was an amazing movie that stayed true to the book. Everything about this movie was well done.
SleepDreamWrite 9 months ago
Well that was tense. The cast was good in this. And the locations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great movie
LJordan More than 1 year ago
This was a very hard look at what our elite military personal have to go through on a daily bases. I enjoyed the movie, but it did have some scenes that were hard to watch knowing it was a true story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago