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Lost Highway
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Lost Highway

4.5 14
Director: David Lynch

Cast: Bill Pullman, Patricia Arquette, Balthazar Getty

 

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Five years after the critical and commercial disappointment of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, director David Lynch returned to the big screen with this cryptic thriller about confused identities and erotic obsession. Fred (Bill Pullman) is an avant-garde jazz saxophonist who shares a luxurious but fashionably barren house with his wife Renee (Patricia Arquette)

Overview

Five years after the critical and commercial disappointment of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, director David Lynch returned to the big screen with this cryptic thriller about confused identities and erotic obsession. Fred (Bill Pullman) is an avant-garde jazz saxophonist who shares a luxurious but fashionably barren house with his wife Renee (Patricia Arquette). Fred suspects that Renee may be unfaithful to him, but realizes he has bigger things to worry about when a series of videotapes appear at his door that prove someone is watching his home from the outside and inside. When Renee is found murdered, Fred finds himself behind bars, but one morning Fred is no longer in his cell. He has seemingly been transformed into Pete Drayton (Balthazar Getty), a young auto mechanic who foolishly allowed himself to get involved with the wife of gangster Dick Laurent (Robert Loggia), a luscious blonde named Alice who looks exactly like Renee.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Lucia Bozzola
Another extreme exploration of the darkness within, Lost Highway (1997) marked David Lynch's cinematic and artistic comeback after Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992). A bold move away from typical Hollywood narrative, Lynch and co-writer Barry Gifford craft a quintessentially Lynch-ian mind game of multiple identities, heroes, villains, and femme fatales that defies conventional space and time. Spiked with such evocative film noir images as a highway at night and a burning cabin, Lost Highway's tale of jealousy, murder, and retribution becomes the ultimate noir fever dream of sexual terror, yearning, and violence, yet Lynch still finds a hopeful space for woozy romance between Balthazar Getty and Natasha Gregson Wagner. Even as the story flies out of control (though Robert Blake's disturbing "Mystery Man" seems to know all the answers), Lost Highway remains a sound/image tour de force, particularly in the ultra-moody first half before the cacophony explodes in the second half. Making its perversity the prime attraction, Lost Highway's ads trumpeted its two thumbs down from mainstream critics Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel; Lynch's next film, The Straight Story (1999), however, precisely lived up to its title.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/25/2008
UPC:
0025195018111
Original Release:
1997
Rating:
R
Source:
Universal Studios
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
2:00:00
Sales rank:
842

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Bill Pullman Fred Madison
Patricia Arquette Alice Wakefield,Renee Madison
Balthazar Getty Pete Dayton
Robert Blake Mystery Man
Robert Loggia Mr. Eddy/Dick Laurent
Natasha Gregson Wagner Sheila
Richard Pryor Arnie
Lisa Boyle Marian
Michael Massee Andy
Jack Nance Phi
Jack Kehler Guard Johnny Mack
Henry Rollins Guard Henry
Gene Ross Warden Clements
Scott Coffey Teddy
Gary Busey Bill Dayton
John Roselius Al
Lou Eppolito Ed
Jennifer Syme Junkie Girl
Marilyn Manson Porn actor
Twiggy Ramirez Porn actor
Angelo Badalamenti Conductor

Technical Credits
David Lynch Director,Screenwriter,Sound/Sound Designer
Barry Adamson Songwriter
Angelo Badalamenti Score Composer,Songwriter
Scott Cameron Asst. Director
Peter Deming Cinematographer
Barry Gifford Screenwriter
Elaine J. Huzzar Casting
Leslie Morales Set Decoration/Design
Deepak Nayar Producer
Pat Norris Production Designer
Johanna Ray Casting
Tom Sternberg Producer
Mary Sweeney Editor,Producer
Susumu Tokunow Sound/Sound Designer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Lost Highway
1. Main Titles [3:02]
2. Beginning of the End [6:52]
3. Dreaming [9:02]
4. Watched [8:35]
5. Invited Guest [5:44]
6. Committed [6:42]
7. Found Guilty [11:27]
8. Uncertain [7:38]
9. No Problem [9:05]
10. Go for a Drive [4:52]
11. Magic Moment [8:23]
12. Remember Anything? [5:26]
13. Part of the Deal [4:51]
14. We Meet Again [4:37]
15. On the Job [4:28]
16. Why Me? [9:19]
17. Bad Coincidence [9:16]
18. End Titles [10:44]

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Lost Highway 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
vink More than 1 year ago
This was my gateway film to the dear David Lynch. No training wheels for me. Since then I've digested most of his other work, though nothing has stuck with me like this movie. This is a complicated world where characters aren't reduced to good or evil. Instead, they have deep motivators like justice and pride. You end up with questions like: is there a villain, or an angel of vengeance? Scenes take their time, but every line of dialog drags you a little further in the woods. This movie has influenced both the stories I gravitate toward and the stories I write. I consider this movie a friend.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been waiting (along with most Lynch fans) for years for a proper DVD release of this film, and the wait is finally over. I remember watching the VHS copy I have for the first time and walking away in awe of what I had just seen. There is such a complex web of plot going on here that you must see it more than once to have a good understanding of what it is all about. And what is it all about? It boils down to a few main ideas: guilt, love, passion, murder and acceptance. Watch the film, think about it. Watch it again. Think some more. Repeat this process (one that longtime Lynch fans are familiar with) until it all starts to come together. When it does, you will be thoroughly satisfied.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although the film was amazing, it is confusing as hell. at first, i didn't understand it - i liked it alot but just didn't understand it. the second time i saw it i understood it alot more which is normal for Lynch movies.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is absolutely one of the strangest movies I have ever seen. Some parts in this are actually kind of frightening. The story is so weird that you won't even know what's going on. In fact, the main character of the story transforms into someone totally different halfway through the movie and the movie revolves around a different person for a long time. It's hard to explain so you just have to see it for yourself to understand how bizarre this actually is. Some of the acting with the two detectives in the beginning could've been better. But for the most part, everyone in this movie acts sort of quiet and a little secretive. If you are a movie buff then this would be a movie to see but if you're looking for a sexy movie this CERTAINLY would be a movie to see, but if you're looking for a movie that you would want to understand while watching then this probably won't be a movie to watch. I can't tell whether this movie is a romance movie, a horror movie, or an action movie, or whatever.
Guest More than 1 year ago
You'd probably have to recognize Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, as the point where David Lynch finally shook off the shackles of pesky linear narritives and neatly wrapped story lines. Mulholland Drive was perhaps his most well received picture in this vein, but undoubtedly the best is Lost Highway. Lynchian trademarks like darkness, violence, sex and stilted dialogue abound and florish, steeped in an atmosphere of paranoia and dread, (that Lynch can apparently create out of thin air). Lost Highway, like Fire Walk With Me, Mulholland Drive and Inland Empire deals with guilt and madness stemming from or leading to murder, but Highway is the most focused and downright entertaining of the bunch. Don't be frustrated, Lynch wont pander to you. Watch it again and you'll pick up more. Style to burn and downright scary, (particularly any time Robert Blake is on screen), this one sets the standard for avant garde horror films.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
David Lynch is absolutely brilliant, and I consider this his best work. Very dark and enveloping. If you're a fan of Twin Peaks, Blue Velvet, Mulholland Drive, etc. this one is even better. I won't tell you what it's about, or what it means to me. There are many things in the movie that I believe are open to personal interpretation. Unbelievably good movie, that's all I really need to say. Buy it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Robert Blake's charecter is a ''demon'' that haunts Fred's soul. Fred is in prison, but he has created a mental hell for himself in wich he can ultimately never escape the truth, as it ''really happened''. The mystery man is the only one who really knows the truth, and always reminds Fred when Fred begins to slip too far into his fantasy. MM:''In the far east when someone is sentenced to death...'' The entire film takes place in fred's demented mind, Physically Fred is in prison for the jealous murder of his wife Rene. MM:''If she told you her name was Alice, She's lying!'' Pete is Fred, notice how Pete's parents disapear when the mystery man gets on the phone w/Pete.. As reality begins to set in again.. And Fred's fantasy life as Pete begins to crumble. Fred's mind is haunted by the people he murdred, and his strange relationship with his late wife Rene, who he loved deeply, but also hated for not being entirely his. Alice:''You'll never have me!'' The ''lost highway'' is fred's journey from one fantasy life to the next. This is just my view of the film.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Lost Highway is a masterpiece. I highly recommend this film for David Lynch fans, or people who are just looking for something different than the mindless commercial movies which dominate the industry. I thought this film was better than Blue Velvet, another of Lynch's films. It took (the infamous) Robert Blake something like 8 times of reading the script to understand the movie, so it is not for those looking for a light watch. Speaking of Blake, after watching him in this movie, I am convinced he is guilty and is an evil, evil man. Or a very good actor...