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Lost Souls
     

Lost Souls

3.6 3
Director: Janusz Kaminski, Winona Ryder, Ben Chaplin, Sarah Wynter

Cast: Janusz Kaminski, Winona Ryder, Ben Chaplin, Sarah Wynter

 

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A woman who has survived the touch of ultimate evil must now save one man from the same fate in order to protect the world in this supernatural thriller. Maya Larkin (Winona Ryder) is a devout Catholic who is said to have been possessed by a demon as a child; she now works with Father Lareaux (John Hurt) and John Townshend (Elias Koteas), fellow believers who

Overview

A woman who has survived the touch of ultimate evil must now save one man from the same fate in order to protect the world in this supernatural thriller. Maya Larkin (Winona Ryder) is a devout Catholic who is said to have been possessed by a demon as a child; she now works with Father Lareaux (John Hurt) and John Townshend (Elias Koteas), fellow believers who perform exorcisms on troubled souls they believe are controlled by Satan. While performing an exorcism on a mass murderer, Henry Birdsong (John Diehl), Maya, and her cohorts come in contact with Peter Kelson (Ben Chaplin), a journalist and noted authority on the criminal mind who believes the notion of "evil with a capital E" is absurd. Peter is an agnostic despite being raised by a Catholic priest; his uncle, Father James (Philip Baker Hall), raised Peter after the death of his parents while he was still a child. During their failed exorcism, Birdsong tells Maya that Satan will return to Earth, inhabiting the body of a man in order to reclaim this world. As Maya attempts to unravel the code of who the devil's victim will be, she comes to the awful realization that the most likely candidate is Peter Kelson. Lost Souls marked the directorial debut of cinematographer Janusz Kaminski, whose camera credits include Saving Private Ryan, Schindler's List, and Jerry Maguire.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Ed Hulse
Several recent horror movies have connected a satanic resurgence with the coming of a new millennium, but the most spine-chillingly convincing of these is Lost Souls, a visually stylish supernatural thriller directed by Oscar-winning cinematographer Janusz Kaminski (Saving Private Ryan, Schindler's List). With nods to its genre forefathers (The Omen, Rosemary's Baby, and The Exorcist), the film follows waiflike Winona Ryder as a young woman whose onetime demonic possession makes her uniquely suited to ferreting out Satan's minions, who are preparing for the Dark Prince's return. Ben Chaplin plays an up-and-coming author who, initially skeptical when Winona tags him as the Antichrist, finally realizes that he’s destined to play a pivotal role in the tumult to come. This densely plotted thriller is genuinely unsettling; Good's triumph over Evil is by no means assured, or even probable. Kaminski heightens the tension with his atmospheric imagery, which is the film's primary asset. But the principal players -- among them John Hurt, Philip Baker Hall, and Elias Koteas -- also aid the director's efforts to promote unease with their carefully calibrated performances. Lost Souls may not be fresh in concept, but, like its esteemed predecessors, it is certainly striking in execution.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/21/2001
UPC:
0794043532436
Original Release:
2000
Rating:
R
Source:
New Line Home Video

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Winona Ryder Maya Larkin
Ben Chaplin Peter Kelson
Sarah Wynter Claire Van Owen
Philip Baker Hall Father James
John Hurt Father Lareaux
Elias Koteas John Townsend
Brian Reddy Father Frank
John Beasley Mike Smythe
John Diehl Henry Birdson
Victor Slezak Father Thomas
Brad Greenquist George Viznik
W. Earl Brown William Kelson
James Lancaster Father Jeremy

Technical Credits
Janusz Kaminski Director
Cinesite Animator
Chris Cornwell Art Director
Christopher Cronyn Co-producer
Michael De Luca Executive Producer
Larry Dias Set Decoration/Design
Mauro Fiore Cinematographer
Pierce Gardner Executive Producer,Original Story,Screenwriter
Anne Goursaud Editor
Jan A.P. Kaczmarek Score Composer
Donna Langley Executive Producer
Mindy Marin Casting
Conny Marinos Set Decoration/Design
Andrew Mondshein Editor
Jill M. Ohanneson Costumes/Costume Designer
Kim Ornitz Sound/Sound Designer
Nilo Otero Asst. Director
Meg Ryan Producer
Nina R. Sadowsky Producer
Betsy Stahl Executive Producer,Original Story
Carl Stansel Set Decoration/Design
Garreth Stover Production Designer
Sloane U'ren Set Decoration/Design
Jason Weil Set Decoration/Design

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Lost Souls 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you ignore the inadequacies in the story structure, you have yoursel a very entertaining film. The cast is wonderful! Especially Ryder!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Many people have said the worst things about this film for various reasons: it ''rips-off'' The Exorcist, it has a ''bad story'', Winona ''sucks''. Well, I suppose I can agree on the latter. This might definitely be one of the worst of Winona's performances, but that's no excuse to ignore ''Lost Souls''. Not only does this manage to be genuinely scary, but the directing and special effects are brilliant, the score is chilling and Ben Chaplin does a good job. Fundamentalist christian reviewers might try to convince you how this flick tends to show Christianity ''in the worst way possible'', but that couldn't be further from the truth. ''Lost Souls'' stands out as one of the few demonology-related horror films which manage to evaluate faith and religion from all sides, remaining consistent and compelling. Ignore Winona's unfortunate performance, and you've got your money well spend. The Exorcist? FORGET IT - this, at least, is credible.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This movie had a great story and great actors, but there was just no action. I was very disappointed because I had read reviews on how good this movie was, and I thought the opposite. It's not the worst movie out there, though.