Lovely & Amazing

Lovely & Amazing

4.3 3
Director: Nicole Holofcener

Cast: Catherine Keener, Brenda Blethyn, Emily Mortimer

     
 

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Nicole Holofcener's witty personal drama Lovely & Amazing comes to DVD in a standard-issue release from Vidmark. The film is justly presented in 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen with Dolby Digital 5.1 sound. It also comes with an audio commentary from writer/director Holofcener, Spanish subtitles, and English closed captions. Interviews with Catherine Keener,See more details below

Overview

Nicole Holofcener's witty personal drama Lovely & Amazing comes to DVD in a standard-issue release from Vidmark. The film is justly presented in 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen with Dolby Digital 5.1 sound. It also comes with an audio commentary from writer/director Holofcener, Spanish subtitles, and English closed captions. Interviews with Catherine Keener, Holofcener, and other cast and crew members reveal production details. The only other bonus features are storyboards and the original theatrical trailer in anamorphic widescreen. Though light on the extras, this disc offers a solid presentation of a underrated film that only received a limited theatrical release.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Gregory Baird
It's like mother, like daughter when it comes to low self-esteem in Lovely and Amazing, a beautifully self-assured ensemble comedy-drama from director Nicole Holofcener. A slice-of-life character study set in Los Angeles, Lovely and Amazing follows a few weeks in the lives of a single, middle-aged woman (Brenda Blethyn), her two grown daughters (Emily Mortimer and Catherine Keener), and her adopted pre-teen daughter (Raven Goodwin). The four grapple with insecurities about their looks, talents, and relationships, finding tentative solutions as varied as liposuction, marital infidelity, binges at McDonald's, and the adoption of stray dogs. While these plot developments provide sparks of tension, Lovely and Amazing deftly avoids melodrama. Instead, it works in pastel shades, revealing through the small but telling moments of everyday life the deeper fears and dissatisfactions that lurk beneath. In the end, Lovely and Amazing provides no big answers, just a few small reminders that a little dysfunction is par for the relationship course, and a little neurosis may not be such a crime after all. It's this quiet undertone of optimism and self-acceptance that makes Lovely and Amazing a thoroughly charming and gently reassuring family portrait.
All Movie Guide - Josh Ralske
Fans of Nicole Holofcener's wry urban comedy Walking and Talking will be ready for the emotional honesty and observational wit of her follow-up, Lovely & Amazing, but they may not be prepared for the film's nearly relentless downbeat tone. Not that Walking and Talking didn't have its painful and awkward moments, but it was feel-good escapism by comparison. As in the earlier film, Holofcener has assembled a gifted ensemble of actors, led by Catherine Keener. Adding their considerable talents are Brenda Blethyn, Jake Gyllenhaal, and James LeGros. Holofcener has also cast a refreshingly naturalistic child actor, Raven Goodwin, as the adopted young daughter, the troubled Annie. As exemplified by her character, Holofcener is exploring more wide-ranging themes here than the enjoyable navel-gazing of her debut. Delving boldly and uncompromisingly into issues of race and body image, Holofcener manages to find the mordant humor in a lot of unpleasant situations. Michelle isn't nearly as self-aware or likeable as the character Keener played in Walking and Talking. She's an edgy, sarcastic, self-involved oddball, and manages to undergo a little growth over the course of the film. Highlights of Lovely & Amazing include a memorably creepy, sad, and funny scene in which the self-critical Elizabeth (Emily Mortimer) stands naked before Kevin McCabe (Dermot Mulroney), a successful actor whom she barely knows, and demands that he give her a completely honest critique of her body. There's the moment when Annie expresses her wish to "tear off" her skin, in order to be more like her adoptive mother. There's an acute honesty to these and other, similar scenes which many will find off-putting. The dysfunctional Marks family does grow a little closer as the film progresses, and the film's honesty, humor, and engaging performances make the uncomfortable subject matter easier to bear.

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Product Details

Release Date:
11/26/2002
UPC:
0031398815228
Original Release:
2001
Rating:
R
Source:
Lions Gate
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Time:
1:31:00
Sales rank:
66,627

Special Features

Closed Caption; 16x9 widescreen; 5.1 Dolby Digital; Trailer; Cast & crew interviews; English & Spanish subtitles

Cast & Crew

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Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Posing [4:47]
2. Flabby Arms [3:27]
3. Confidants [3:02]
4. Promises [3:44]
5. Lip Service [3:41]
6. Bathtime [2:50]
7. Surgery [4:10]
8. Floating [3:34]
9. Broken Chair [3:32]
10. Comfort [2:49]
11. Artist [3:09]
12. Agent [3:07]
13. Waking Up [3:54]
14. A Little Help [2:33]
15. Developments [3:27]
16. Flirtation [4:21]
17. Afterglow [5:17]
18. Little Sister [4:01]
19. Just Friends [5:58]
20. Stray [2:35]
21. Missing [5:02]
22. Understanding [4:12]
23. Come Together [4:21]
24. End Credits [3:26]

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