MacBeth

( 3 )

Overview

With the 2006 MacBeth, controversial Australian director Geoffrey Wright (Romper Stomper, Metal Skin) launches his fourth big screen outing and continues the trend of reinventing Shakespeare by contemporizing the bard's plays. As in other recent efforts (Richard Loncraine's Richard III (1996), Michael Almereyda's Hamlet (2000)), Wright uses a distinctly postmodern context to extract related themes from the original work. Here, Wright reworks the brutal tragedy Macbeth, retaining its Elizabethan dialogue, but ...
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Overview

With the 2006 MacBeth, controversial Australian director Geoffrey Wright (Romper Stomper, Metal Skin) launches his fourth big screen outing and continues the trend of reinventing Shakespeare by contemporizing the bard's plays. As in other recent efforts (Richard Loncraine's Richard III (1996), Michael Almereyda's Hamlet (2000)), Wright uses a distinctly postmodern context to extract related themes from the original work. Here, Wright reworks the brutal tragedy Macbeth, retaining its Elizabethan dialogue, but resituating the events within the arena of modern Australian gang violence. His Macbeth (Sam Worthington) is a drug baron and pimp, his Lady Macbeth a Valium-addicted, narcoleptic burnout and manipulator, his Duncan the head of Melbourne's criminal underground. Macbeth and Lady Macbeth murder Duncan in cold blood (framing the servants as responsible), but soon after Macbeth takes the throne, he is undone - and beheaded - by usurper Macduff. Like former adapter Roman Polanski, Wright ups the quotients of bloodletting, sadism, and underlying iciness. He filmed much of the picture with HD photography - thus capturing a broader range of imagery and a much blacker darkness in his nighttime sequences - and lit a pivotal action scene exclusively with red laser gun sights. The result is a thoroughly unique and unprecedented work.
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Special Features

"Making Of" featurette including: Director Geoffrey Wrigth, stars Sam Worthington & Victoria Hill
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/25/2007
  • UPC: 013137217494
  • Original Release: 2006
  • Rating:

  • Source: Starz / Anchor Bay
  • Region Code: 1
  • Time: 1:50:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Sam Worthington Macbeth
Victoria Hill Lady Macbeth
Lachy Hulme Macduff
Steve Bastoni Banquo
Gary Sweet Duncan
Matt Doran Malcolm
Chloe Armstrong 1st Witch
Kate Bell 2nd Witch
Miranda Nation 3rd Witch
Mick Molloy
Chris Vance
Technical Credits
Geoffrey Wright Director, Co-producer, Screenwriter
Martin Fabinyi Producer
Ann Fay Casting
Maura Fay Casting
Will Gibson Cinematographer
Michael Gudinski Executive Producer
Gary Hamilton Executive Producer
Victoria Hill Co-producer, Producer, Screenwriter
Jane Johnston Costumes/Costume Designer
Frank Lipson Sound/Sound Designer
Nicole Lobegeiger Makeup
David McKay Production Designer
Greg Sitch Executive Producer
Jenni Tosi Co-producer
Jane Usher Editor
John Clifford White Score Composer
Antonio Zeccola Executive Producer
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Macbeth
1. Opening Credits [4:13]
2. "All Hail Macbeth" [9:43]
3. What Is Lost, Is Won [1:38]
4. "I Shall Be What I'm Promised" [3:59]
5. "Hail Malcolm" [4:54]
6. The Party [8:58]
7. "I See Thee Still" [6:39]
8. Grim Discovery [8:28]
9. An Invitation [5:28]
10. Supper [7:54]
11. Three Witches [7:19]
12. "Be Not Found Here" [:45]
13. Unnatural Troubles [9:40]
14. Revenge [3:52]
15. A Kiss Goodnight [8:59]
16. End Credits [12:57]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Macbeth
   Play Movie
   Set Up
      Audio Options
         English 5.1
         English 2.0
   Chapters
   Bonus
      Featurette
      Macbeth Trailer
      Beowule & Grendel
      The Other Conquest Trailer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    'All the world's a stage, adn all the men and women merely players'

    It is refreshing to rest assured that Shakespeare remains a viable writer and no matter how his plays are manipulated or 'updated' or altered or interpreted, his majesty of the English language remains intact and the impact of his ideas and words sustain even the most bizarre reconsiderations. Such, for this viewer, is the case of MACBETH as condensed for the screen by writer/actress Victoria Hill and directed with intensity and sensitivity of communication by Geoffrey Wright. The result may seem to be a bloody mad feud suggesting a majority of the teen driven films of today, but consider the source: imagining Shakespeare's MACBETH without the gore would mean the meat had been removed. Transferred from Scotland to Melbourne, Australia, the well-known fight for kingship among the Scots is transposed to be the turf struggle for supremacy in the underworld gangland of Melbourne. The script and the direction make this transposition work, using the original dialog from the play, placing it in the voices and bodies of an all-Australian cast, to the point that the allegiance of the actors as to place is far less important than the telling of a powerful tale of ambition. Sam Worthington makes an enigmatic yet strong Macbeth, well paired by Victoria Hill as his conniving and ultimately mad wife Lady Macbeth: the two form a chemistry that serves the original intent of the author well. The many characters who rise and fall in the wake of the ambition of Macbeth tend to blend a bit because of the condensation of the script, but Gary Sweet as the doomed Duncan, Steve Batoni as Banquo, and Lachy Hulme as Macduff are particularly fine. The three witches whose predictions drive the play here become nude seductresses and are well interpreted by Miranda Nation, Chloe Armstrong, and Kate Bell. The battle scenes are appropriately gruesome and the musical score that accompanies this film is an odd mixture of rock and piano transcriptions of Beethoven symphony movements. With the bracing cinematography by Will Gibson it all works well. Unfortunately the Shakespearean language can become lost with the heavy Aussie accents and subtitles would have been helpful. But if your television set has that subtitle option available, this small defect can be overcome. Yes, it helps to know the original play well in order to fully appreciate the transposition, but the script and cast and director make a fine case for involving even the uninitiated into the power of MACBETH. Worth your time, this. Grady Harp

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews