Magic Mike

Overview

Steven Soderbergh's Magic Mike stars Channing Tatum as the title character, an entrepreneur who works as a roofer and in several other occupations, but makes most of his money being the star attraction at Club Xquisite, a male strip joint in Tampa that fills every weekend night with drunken, horny women eager to slide dollar bills between hard-bodied dudes and the G-strings they wear. While on a roofing job, Mike meets Adam (Alex Pettyfer), a misfit college dropout who lost a football scholarship when he punched ...
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Overview

Steven Soderbergh's Magic Mike stars Channing Tatum as the title character, an entrepreneur who works as a roofer and in several other occupations, but makes most of his money being the star attraction at Club Xquisite, a male strip joint in Tampa that fills every weekend night with drunken, horny women eager to slide dollar bills between hard-bodied dudes and the G-strings they wear. While on a roofing job, Mike meets Adam (Alex Pettyfer), a misfit college dropout who lost a football scholarship when he punched his coach, and he decides to teach the kid how to become an exotic dancer. Mike introduces Adam to Dallas (Matthew McConaughey), the owner of the club, and gets him onto the crew of regular performers. As Dallas plans a big move for the troupe, Mike tries to start his dream business, falls for Adam's sister, and sees Adam fall to the temptations of the stripper life.
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Special Features

Blu-ray special features; Extended dance scenes: watch full-length dance scenes too hot for theaters; Dance play mode: play all dance sequences back to back; Plus: backstage on Magic Mike: from manscaping to hip shaking, Channing Tatum exposes the finer details of being a male stripper and the transformation that his costars McConaughey, Bomer and Manganiello went through to perfect the art of taking off their clothes
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Perry Seibert
Much of the talk surrounding director Steven Soderbergh in the months before the release of his male-stripper movie Magic Mike concerned the Palme d'Or winner's stated desire to quit filmmaking once and for all -- that he needed to get away and rethink his entire approach to directing. Magic Mike is many things, including his autobiographical expression of this longing to get out of the business. The movie stars Channing Tatum as the title character, an entrepreneur who works as a roofer and in several other occupations, but makes most of his money being the star attraction at Club Xquisite, a male strip joint in Tampa that fills every weekend night with drunken, horny women eager to slide dollar bills between hard-bodied dudes and the G-strings they wear. While on a roofing job, Mike meets Adam Alex Pettyfer, a misfit college dropout who lost a football scholarship when he punched his coach, and he decides to teach the kid how to become an exotic dancer. Mike introduces Adam to Dallas Matthew McConaughey, the owner of the club, and gets him onto the crew of regular performers. Much like he did with Contagion, Soderbergh spends the first half of Magic Mike giving you exactly the movie you expect -- in this case, a beefcake-laden tour of a sleazy and funny subculture that's like an old-school backstage-showbiz melodrama crossed with Chippendales. However, the most cerebral of A-list American directors has no interest in doing just that. Thanks to a solid script by Reid Carolin, Soderbergh continuously reminds us that every decision these characters make has to do with money. This is both a critique of capitalism -- showcasing its good and bad elements -- and a self-revealing explanation of why Soderbergh is done with moviemaking. Although Mike has a blast at his job and is paid well for it, his ultimate goal is to open his own furniture-design company. He wants to create unique pieces from found objects, but the demands of the marketplace -- and the various material benefits of rolling in dough -- make it hard for him to do more than just talk about this dream. As is usually the case, Soderbergh casts the film to perfection. Tatum has grown as an actor in the last few years, and his effortless charisma here opens up new possibilities for his career -- he proves he's capable of carrying a picture with more than just his remarkable physique. Cody Horn, who plays Adam's sister and a possible love interest for Mike, has a no-nonsense quality that seems earned by a woman with a brother as messed up as hers. And Pettyfer does a great job with his role as the hot-headed ingénue seduced by sudden wealth, fame, and drugs. However, the piéce de résistance is McConaughey, an actor who was truly born to play a male stripper named Dallas. As the club owner, he's the symbol of capitalism's power -- he's positioning to open a bigger spot in Miami -- and glistens with sweat and smarm. He's a natural for the part, and he gets an amazing scene in which he teaches Adam how to do a pelvic thrust that will send young women to such levels of revelry that they won't be able to help themselves from forking over their cash. It's a very funny, deeply cynical spin on the traditional training sequence, and if this movie had come out in November instead of June, there would be Oscar buzz surrounding McConaughey with that scene in particular providing the perfect highlight. This is far from the first time Soderbergh has made explicit connections between money and interpersonal relationships, nor is it the first time he's focused on people who command a lucrative payday for offering up their physical attributes. In many ways, Magic Mike feels like a big-budget, gender-flipped version of his micro-indie drama The Girlfriend Experience, which starred porn queen Sasha Grey as a high-end call girl who attempts to have a meaningful private life while being an expert at making her clients feel like the most special men on Earth during their brief time together. The focus here isn't so much on how Mike's career decisions affect his ability to connect with women, but on how his choices have led him astray from his own sense of himself -- how easily he's lived a lifestyle that no longer interests him. In that regard, one of the most enjoyable arcs in the film is Mike's relationship with Joanna Olivia Munn, a grad student who treats Mike like a fellow traveler on a quest for erotic satisfaction. She has his number before he does, and the way their relationship develops reveals both to him and to us how far his real life is from the one he wants to be living. All this makes the movie sound like a heavy-handed drama, but Soderbergh's touch is mostly light and always entertaining. You're allowed to ogle these guys on-stage in various routines -- including one in which they start out dressed as soldiers that will put any jingoistic prudes in a tizzy trying to figure out how and why they're offended. Add to that Tatum's abundant charisma, as well as the overwhelming presence that is McConaughey finding heretofore unseen levels of narcissism, and what you've got is a smart movie that never fails to entertain the audience. What's so appealing about the film is how little bitterness Soderbergh has for this business. He could have easily fashioned something that would have been an attack on audiences for making him waste his time on such silly diversions, but there isn't a whiff of that at all. Mike isn't a martyr to success, just someone ready to start over. Magic Mike makes a perfect punctuation mark to end the career of a great director -- if in fact he really does walk away from it all.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/23/2012
  • UPC: 883929249275
  • Original Release: 2012
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Home Video
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Bonus DVD / Subtitled
  • Sound: Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound
  • Time: 1:50:00
  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Sales rank: 9,024

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Channing Tatum Magic Mike
Alex Pettyfer , Adam
Matthew Bomer , Ken
Joe Manganiello Big Dick Richie
Matthew McConaughey Dallas
Cody Horn Brooke, Paige
Olivia Munn , Joanna
Riley Keough , Nora
Kevin Nash , Tarzan
Adam Rodriguez , Tito
Gabriel Iglesias , Tobias
James Martin Kelly Sal
Reid Carolin Paul
Avery Camp Girl in Line
George E. Sack Jr. George
Micaela Johnson Portia
Denise Vasi Ruby
Camryn Grimes Birthday Girl
Kate Easton Liz
Asher Wallis Obnoxious Bar Guy
Alison Faulk Havana Nights Girl
Catherine Lynn Stone Blonde Bachelorette
Jennifer Skinner Silhouette Girl
Vanessa Ryan Cowboy Lap Dance Girl
Teresa Espinosa Pony Girl
Betsy Brandt Banker
Monica Garcia Dr. Love Girl
Annette Houlihan Verdolino Tarzan's Girl
Candace Marie Celmer Boxing Girl
Lyss Remaly Girl Richie Lifts
Jannel Diaz Tito's Girl
Mircea Monroe Ken's Wife
Maynard the Pig Herman the Pig
Caitlin Gerard Kim
Yari Deleon Sorority Girl
Cameron Banfield Kim's Boyfriend
Michael Roark Ryan
Keith Kurtz Thug #1
Marland Burke Thug #2
Ashley Hayes Raver Girl
Technical Credits
Steven Soderbergh Director
Peter Andrews Cinematographer
Mary Ann Bernard Editor
Reid Carolin Producer, Screenwriter
Carmen Cuba Casting
Howard Cummings Production Designer
Alison Faulk Choreography
Gregory Jacobs Asst. Director, Producer
Chris Di Leo Art Director
Duane Manwiller Camera Operator
Christopher Peterson Costumes/Costume Designer
Frankie Pine Musical Direction/Supervision
Channing Tatum Producer
Nick Wechsler Producer
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Magic Mike
1. Scene 1 [4:31]
2. Scene 2 [5:58]
3. Scene 3 [5:37]
4. Scene 4 [4:58]
5. Scene 5 [5:10]
6. Scene 6 [6:56]
7. Scene 7 [4:10]
8. Scene 8 [4:46]
9. Scene 9 [4:01]
10. Scene 10 [3:34]
11. Scene 11 [6:45]
12. Scene 12 [2:42]
13. Scene 13 [4:28]
14. Scene 14 [6:43]
15. Scene 15 [4:40]
16. Scene 16 [4:16]
17. Scene 17 [3:47]
18. Scene 18 [3:58]
19. Scene 19 [5:10]
20. Scene 20 [4:52]
21. Scene 21 [5:29]
22. Scene 22 [3:11]
23. Scene 23 [4:29]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Magic Mike
   Play
   Scene Selection
   Languages
      Audio
         English 5.1
         English 2.0
         Français
         Español
      Subtitles
         English (For the Hearing Impaired)
         Français
         Español
         No Subtitles
   Special Features
      Behind the Scenes: Backstage on Magic Mike
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