Marnie

Marnie

3.7 8
Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Cast: Alfred Hitchcock, Tippi Hedren, Sean Connery, Diane Baker

     
 

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Condemned as being a "disappointing" and "unworthy" Alfred Hitchcock effort at the time of its release, Marnie has since grown in stature; it is still considered a lesser Hitchcock, but a fascinating one. Tippi Hedren plays Marnie, a compulsive thief who cannot stand to be touched by any man. She also goes bonkers over the sight of the color red. Her new boss,See more details below

Overview

Condemned as being a "disappointing" and "unworthy" Alfred Hitchcock effort at the time of its release, Marnie has since grown in stature; it is still considered a lesser Hitchcock, but a fascinating one. Tippi Hedren plays Marnie, a compulsive thief who cannot stand to be touched by any man. She also goes bonkers over the sight of the color red. Her new boss, Mark Rutland (Sean Connery) is intrigued by Marnie -- to such an extent that he blackmails her into marriage when he stumbles onto her breaking into his safe. Rutland is in his own way as "sick" as his wife because of his fetishist desire to cohabit with a thief. After innumerable plot twists and turns, Marnie is "cured" by a facile but mesmerizing flashback sequence involving her ex-hooker mother (Louise Latham). Among the critical carps aimed at Marnie was the complaint that the studio-bound sets -- particularly the waterfront locale where the film ends -- were tacky and artificial; curiously, this seeming "carelessness" adds to the queasy, off-setting mood that Hitchcock endeavored to sustain. Even when the direction seems to falter, the film is buoyed by the driving musical score of Bernard Herrmann (his last for Hitchcock). Among the supporting actors in Marnie are Mariette Hartley as a secretary and Bruce Dern as a sailor; twelve years later, Dern would star in Hitchcock's final film, Family Plot.

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Kryssa Schemmerling
Long considered a failure, Marnie, the most blatantly Freudian of all of Hitchcock's films is also one of his most fascinating -- a tightly wrought exploration of the director's pet themes. Voyeurism, obsession - it's all here, with a little white-collar crime thrown in for good measure. Marnie (Tippi Hedren), the iciest ice queen in Hitchcock’s gallery of cool blondes, is a job-hopping kleptomaniac whose wealthy employer (Sean Connery) is undaunted, even titillated, by her compulsive thievery. Threatening to turn her in unless she marries him, Connery attempts to cure his new wife of her frigidity and hatred of men. Using the color red to unusual and brilliant effect, Hitchcock takes the viewer on a mesmerizing journey into the mind of his profoundly disturbed heroine.
All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
Marnie could never be confused with prime Alfred Hitchcock, but it's a much better film than its tarnished reputation would lead one to believe. Modern audiences will likely find its psychological undercurrents a bit basic -- and therefore find the ending somewhat pat, predictable, and artificial -- but it somehow works nonetheless. There are some technical aspects -- the artificial locales of some sequences, the "red" motif -- that may seem primitive (although it's arguable that Hitchcock wanted just this kind of distancing effect to unsettle the audience as the characters themselves are unsettled). But Marnie has a basically intriguing story, and Jay Presson Allen's screenplay skillfully sets out its plot and fills out its characters so that they live and breathe. Hitchcock, of course, knows how to take advantage of the screenplay's strengths, tossing in surprising angles and building suspense through simple, but skillful, juxtapositions and tight editing. Tippi Hedren displays unexpected depth in the title role, Sean Connery is appropriately tough and tender, as called for, and there's a real sexual tension between them. Of the supporting cast, Diane Baker is alluring and dangerous and Louise Latham effectively chilling as the mother. Bernard Herrmann's score, pulsing with danger and passion, is a definite plus.

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Product Details

Release Date:
02/07/2006
UPC:
0025192830822
Original Release:
1964
Rating:
PG
Source:
Universal Studios
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
2:11:00
Sales rank:
9,726

Special Features

The Trouble with Marnie; The Marnie archives; Theatrical trailer; And more!

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Tippi Hedren Marnie Edgar
Sean Connery Mark Rutland
Diane Baker Lil Mainwaring
Martin Gabel Sidney Strutt
Louise Latham Bernice Edgar, Mamie's mother
Bruce Dern Sailor
Bob Sweeney Cousin Bob
Milton Selzer Man at the Track
Mariette Hartley Susan Clabon
Alan Napier Mr. Rutland
Henry Beckman 1st Detective
S. John Launer Sam Ward
Meg Wyllie Mrs. Turpin
Morgan Brittany Actor
Louise Lorimer Mrs. Strutt
Edith Evanson Rita

Technical Credits
Alfred Hitchcock Director,Producer
Jay Presson Allen Screenwriter
Jack Barron Makeup
Robert F. Boyle Production Designer
Robert Burks Cinematographer
Bob Dawn Makeup
Edith Head Costumes/Costume Designer
Bernard Herrmann Score Composer
George Milo Set Decoration/Design
Rita Riggs Costumes/Costume Designer
William Russell Sound/Sound Designer
Howard Smit Makeup
Leonard J. South Camera Operator
George Tomasini Editor
Waldon O. Watson Sound/Sound Designer

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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Alfred Hitchcock Masterpiece: Marnie
1. Main Titles [1:59]
2. The Mystery Brunette [6:48]
3. Mama [10:03]
4. The New Payroll Clerk [7:05]
5. A Drop of Red [2:51]
6. Instinctual Behavior [6:04]
7. The Race Track [5:03]
8. The Rutlands [3:57]
9. A Robbery at Rutland's [5:02]
10. The "Real" Marnie [11:33]
11. The New Mrs. Rutland [7:11]
12. If You Touch Me... [11:46]
13. Beneath the Facade [11:13]
14. That Dream... [6:53]
15. A Face From the Past [:00]
16. The Death of a Friend [7:23]
17. Take the Money [4:48]
18. A Visit With Mama [6:02]
19. Remember, Marnie... [3:14]
20. Marnie's Choice [10:07]

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