Martha Marcy May Marlene by T. Sean Durkin |Elizabeth Olsen, Christopher Abbott, Brady Corbet | 24543771630 | DVD | Barnes & Noble
Martha Marcy May Marlene

Martha Marcy May Marlene

4.0 2
Director: T. Sean Durkin

Cast: Elizabeth Olsen, Christopher Abbott, Brady Corbet

     
 

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An escaped cult member experiences paranoia and isolation while attempting to start a new life with her sister's family. Try as Martha might to blend into her new upper-middle-class surroundings, she can't help but be haunted by nightmares of the time she spent under the control of a malevolent cult leader, or the fear that the group is watching her every move and

Overview

An escaped cult member experiences paranoia and isolation while attempting to start a new life with her sister's family. Try as Martha might to blend into her new upper-middle-class surroundings, she can't help but be haunted by nightmares of the time she spent under the control of a malevolent cult leader, or the fear that the group is watching her every move and awaiting the perfect moment to take their revenge.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jeremy Wheeler
Deliberate in pace and haunting in nature, Martha Marcy May Marlene is a dreamlike character study of a former cultist's reintroduction to society and her attempts to understand her place in the world. Elizabeth Olsen gives a stunning performance in the lead role -- no small feat given that the film frequently moves from the present day to flashbacks and back again. At the helm, first-time filmmaker T. Sean Durkin commands the proceedings with a calculation that continues to impress long after the credits roll. Dread lies in the pores of each frame, promising that no good will come out of the situation. The film opens with shots of a seemingly normal farm. The first glimpse that something is amiss in this setting is a dinner scene where the men of the house eat before the women, all of whom dine in silence afterwards. Durkin then cuts to the morning, as viewers witness Martha (Olsen) fleeing from the compound to the nearest town, where she's caught at a diner by one of her fellow farmhands. Though she is allowed to leave, the past is never too far behind her, as she finds out when she moves into a summer lake house with her sister Lucy (Sarah Paulson) and her husband (Hugh Dancy). Long out of touch, the siblings find it difficult to talk about where Martha has been for last two years -- the memories of which begin to tear Martha apart as her grasp on reality breaks down, cuing the audience in on what was going on at that farm one flashback at a time. Apart from the similar tense aesthetic the film shares with the previous year's Winter's Bone, the two pictures also feature John Hawkes in two very different, yet subtly sinister performances. Though not quite as striking as his Oscar-nominated performance in Bone, the actor does a fine job at portraying an intimidating force that plagues Martha in the past and the present. As admirable as Hawkes is, the picture belongs to Olsen, who's in nearly every frame of the movie. There's a shell-shocked quality to her in the present, while the flashbacks present a lonely, vulnerable side of the character that both she and the audience have a hard time shaking when those scenes end. Martha Marcy May Marlene is a fascinating triumph of indie filmmaking and a smashing debut for Olsen that simply cannot be ignored.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/21/2012
UPC:
0024543771630
Original Release:
2011
Rating:
R
Source:
20th Century Fox
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound]
Time:
1:42:00
Sales rank:
28,022

Special Features

Closed Caption

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Elizabeth Olsen Martha
Christopher Abbott Max
Brady Corbet Watts
Hugh Dancy Ted
Maria Dizzia Katie
Julia Garner Sarah
John Hawkes Patrick
Louisa Krause Zoe
Sarah Paulson Lucy
Adam Thompson Bartender
Lauren Molina Cult Member
Louisa Braden Johnson Cult Member
Tobias Segal Cult Member
Gregg Burton Man in Home #1
Allen McCullough Man in Home #2

Technical Credits
T. Sean Durkin Director,Screenwriter
Coll Anderson Sound/Sound Designer
Antonio Campos Producer
Danny Bensi Score Composer
Andrew Corkin Co-producer
Patrick Cunningham Producer
Tomas Deckaj Asst. Director
Randi Glass Casting
Jonathan Guggenheim Art Director
Ted Hope Executive Producer
Saunder Jurriaans Score Composer
Chad Keith Production Designer
Saemi Kim Executive Producer
Saerom Kim Executive Producer
Jody Lee Lipes Cinematographer
M.P.S.E. Sound/Sound Designer
Chris Maybach Producer
Josh Mond Producer
Matt Palmieri Executive Producer
Brett Potter Associate Producer
Alexander Schepsman Executive Producer
Susan Shopmaker Casting
Zac Stuart-Pontier Editor
David Tabbert Costumes/Costume Designer

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Martha Marcy May Marlene
1. Chapter 1 [5:29]
2. Chapter 2 [4:00]
3. Chapter 3 [3:53]
4. Chapter 4 [3:53]
5. Chapter 5 [4:52]
6. Chapter 6 [4:27]
7. Chapter 7 [3:14]
8. Chapter 8 [2:55]
9. Chapter 9 [3:54]
10. Chapter 10 [6:12]
11. Chapter 11 [6:11]
12. Chapter 12 [4:02]
13. Chapter 13 [5:34]
14. Chapter 14 [1:59]
15. Chapter 15 [3:49]
16. Chapter 16 [2:59]
17. Chapter 17 [3:47]
18. Chapter 18 [:44]
19. Chapter 19 [4:54]
20. Chapter 20 [4:04]
21. Chapter 21 [4:28]
22. Chapter 22 [1:46]
23. Chapter 23 [5:33]
24. Chapter 24 [4:04]

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Martha Marcy May Marlene 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
JimRGill2012 More than 1 year ago
This is a peculiar film indeed—that doesn’t mean it’s bad. It just means it’s quite different from most films you might see. Most unusual is the fact that we get no “backstory” for the main story. The film opens with Martha/Marcy May/Marlene (Elizabeth Olsen in a tortured yet incredibly nuanced performance) escaping a cult in upstate New York to reunite with her estranged sister and her sister’s husband. Flashbacks fill us in on what happened to Martha/Marcy May/Marlene while she was a cult member, yet we never learn how or why she became a member of the cult or why she stayed as long as she did. The present action—Martha/Marcy May/Marlene’s awkward attempts to reconnect with her family despite what her brother-in-law characterizes as her “insane” behavior—focuses mainly on what can only be described as the post-traumatic stress that Martha/Marcy May/Marlene is incapable of dealing with. Her time in the cult has rendered her inert and paranoid, and the film ends as abruptly as it began, with a bizarre traffic incident, the meaning of which seems to fade into oblivion along with Martha/Marcy May/Marlene’s future. Fans of quirky, introspective, and artsy films will have a lot to chew on after watching this one. If it’s action or conventional storytelling you want, best look elsewhere.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago