Mickey Mouse in Black & White Vol. 2: 1928-1935

Mickey Mouse in Black & White Vol. 2: 1928-1935

     
 

Part of the Walt Disney Treasures line, Mickey Mouse in Black and White 2 collects a series of black-and-white short films featuring the Disney icon. The films cover the years from 1928 to 1935. The collection also includes interviews with Disney workers and vintage materials. The set is hosted by film historian Leonard Maltin.See more details below

Overview

Part of the Walt Disney Treasures line, Mickey Mouse in Black and White 2 collects a series of black-and-white short films featuring the Disney icon. The films cover the years from 1928 to 1935. The collection also includes interviews with Disney workers and vintage materials. The set is hosted by film historian Leonard Maltin.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Donald Liebenson
Just as Charlie Chaplin continued to make silent films after Hollywood embraced talking pictures, Mickey Mouse continued to work in monochrome three years after the release of Disney's first color cartoon, "Flowers and Trees." The reason, host Leonard Maltin notes in his introduction to this essential two-disc set, was more financial than artistic. So popular was Mickey around the world -- theater owners often billed his cartoons above the feature presentation -- that there was not much more to be gained by making them in color. To watch these cartoons chronologically (there is also an alphabetical-viewing option) is to chart the evolution of an art form. From the more crudely drawn "Barn Dance" in 1928 to "Mickey's Kangaroo" in 1935, Disney artists pushed the animation envelope and developed the storytelling techniques that paved the way for Walt Disney's foray into feature films. More important, these cartoons illustrate what made Mickey such a phenomenon and an enduring icon of popular culture. He's plucky and upbeat throughout, with nary a nasty bone in his rubbery body. In cartoon "vaudvilles" such as "The Opry House," "The Barnyard Concert," and "The Barnyard Broadcast," he is more ringmaster than leading man, allowing supporting characters to get most of the laughs. Disney has thoughtfully collected a group of more problematic cartoons under the section "From the Vault." These contain varyingly offensive racial and ethnic stereotypes, from Mickey evoking Al Jolson's signature "Mammy" in "The Haunted House" to donning blackface in "Mickey's Mellerdrammer." Maltin advises parents not to "sweep these cartoons under the rug" but rather to take the opportunity to put them in context and discuss how far society has come. Young Mickey fans and animation buffs will treasure this unearthed chapter in the legendary career of Hollywood's royal rodent.

Product Details

Release Date:
12/07/2004
UPC:
0786936239355
Rating:
NR
Source:
Walt Disney Video
Region Code:
1
Time:
5:34:00

Special Features

Closed Caption; [None specified]

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