Modern Marvels: The Creation of the Computer

Modern Marvels: The Creation of the Computer

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Few would deny that the modern computer has changed the face of the human race, and in this technologically-minded installment of The History Channel's Modern Marvels series, documentary filmmakers explore just how the remarkable machines helped the information age soar to historical new heights. From the Victorian "counting machine" of Charles Babbage to the…  See more details below

Overview

Few would deny that the modern computer has changed the face of the human race, and in this technologically-minded installment of The History Channel's Modern Marvels series, documentary filmmakers explore just how the remarkable machines helped the information age soar to historical new heights. From the Victorian "counting machine" of Charles Babbage to the punch-card counting machine that helped to launch IBM during the 1890 census, the room-sized behemoths of the early 20th Century, and the desktop machines that revolutionized life during the millennial crossover, this compelling look at the history of the computer is sure to capture the imagination of devoted techies pondering just what wonders lie ahead on the road to technological nirvana.

Product Details

Release Date:
12/27/2005
UPC:
0733961730906
Original Release:
2005
Rating:
NR
Source:
A&E Home Video
Time:
0:50:00

Special Features

Interactive menus; Scene selection

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- The Creation of the Computer
1. High Speed, Small Package [11:56]
2. Saving the Census [6:32]
3. A Colossus to Solve an Enigma [7:42]
4. The Pathfinders [11:28]
5. Computers on a Chip [6:31]
6. The Continuing Evolution [3:41]

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Modern Marvels: The Creation of the Computer 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Author_David_Boop More than 1 year ago
While this DVD lists a 2005 date of release, it was actually made in 1997. Most of the information is so outdated, it's laughable. Also, it doesn't go into any of the real history of the computer, like Alan Turing, Honeywell vs. Sperry or Liebniz's calculator. I thought History Channel video's were known for their detailed research, but I ended up returning this.