Movern Callar by Lynne Ramsay |Lynne Ramsay, Samantha Morton, Kathleen McDermott, Raife Patrick Burchell | 660200309329 | DVD | Barnes & Noble
Movern Callar

Movern Callar

5.0 1
Director: Lynne Ramsay

Cast: Lynne Ramsay, Samantha Morton, Kathleen McDermott, Raife Patrick Burchell

     
 

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A woman's life is set onto a new path by tragedy and confusion in this offbeat drama from maverick director Lynne Ramsay. Morvern Callar (Samantha Morton) is a woman in her early twenties who wakes up in her flat in a small Scottish town on Christmas morning to a rather unpleasant surprise -- her live-in boyfriend has committed suicide, and his body lies on the floor

Overview

A woman's life is set onto a new path by tragedy and confusion in this offbeat drama from maverick director Lynne Ramsay. Morvern Callar (Samantha Morton) is a woman in her early twenties who wakes up in her flat in a small Scottish town on Christmas morning to a rather unpleasant surprise -- her live-in boyfriend has committed suicide, and his body lies on the floor in a pool of blood. She discovers that he has left a short message for her on the screen of his personal computer ("I love you. Be brave."), as well as the text of a novel he had recently completed. Changing the name on the title page to her own, Morvern begins sending the manuscript out to publishers without having actually read it. Eventually, Morvern disposes of her boyfriend's body, scrubs away the evidence of his suicide, and attempts to reintegrate herself with the world, though the shocking events seems to have built a wall between her and those around her, and she is unable to explain what has happened to anyone, even her best friend, Lanna (Kathleen McDermott). Eventually, Morvern draws the last of her boyfriend's money from the bank and treats herself and Lanna to a short vacation in Spain, where they become friendly with a group of hedonistic British expatriates and soon find their friendship stretched to the breaking point. Morvern Callar was based on the novel by Alan Warner; it was originally intended to be Lynne Ramsay's first directorial effort, but she was able to complete her film Ratcatcher before securing funding for this project.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
From its nearly silent opening passages to its exhilarating and enigmatic capper, Morvern Callar announces itself as the product of a singular sensibility. A tone poem for the rave generation, Lynne Ramsay's latest film may be easier to admire than to like, but there's no denying it establishes her as a filmmaker of tremendous promise. This follow-up to Ramsay's acclaimed debut, Ratcatcher, is a kaleidoscopic immersion, as unknowable and magnetic as its titular heroine. Played by the superb Samantha Morton, Morvern is a cipher, at once strangely disconnected and thrillingly alive. Following the suicide of her boyfriend, she takes an unorthodox path, appropriating his recently finished novel as her own and using the money he left behind to go on a vacation with her best friend, Lanna (Kathleen McDermott). Morvern's impulsive wanderings, which ultimately alienate even the free-spirited Lanna, come across less as inexplicable whimsy than as the pure expression of a generation's existential restlessness. Steeped in cool solipsism, Ramsay's movie privileges sensation over sense: at its best, it's a captivating mosaic of color, music, and mood. In its opacity, Morvern Callar may seem to some a willful exercise in audience frustration. Those who surrender to Ramsay's rough poetry, however, will find the movie a transporting experience.
Washington Post - Desson Howe
As Morvern, Morton is disconcertingly enigmatic, often bordering on catatonic. But she carries the movie effortlessly. And even though we're on the outside looking in, she carries us along, too.
Wall Street Journal - Joe Morgenstern
[Morton's] character here is emotionally mute -- though Morvern speaks, she can't or won't reveal what's in her heart -- and her performance is brilliant from start to finish.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/19/2004
UPC:
0660200309329
Original Release:
2002
Rating:
R
Source:
Palm Pictures / Umvd
Region Code:
1
Time:
1:37:00

Special Features

16x9 widescreen; 5.1 surround sound; Behind the scenes; Bonus footage; Theatrical trailer; Previews; Weblinks

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Samantha Morton Morvern Callar
Kathleen McDermott Lanna
Raife Patrick Burchell Boy in Room 1022
Dan Cadan Dazzer
Carolyn Calder Sheila Tequila
Jim Wilson Tom Boddington
Dolly Wells Susan
Ruby Milton Couris Jean
Linda McGuire Vanessa
Duncan McHardy Actor

Technical Credits
Lynne Ramsay Director,Screenwriter
Phil Barber Art Director
Sarah Blenkinsop Costumes/Costume Designer
Andrew Cannon Musical Direction/Supervision
Lenny Crooks Executive Producer
Paul Davies Sound/Sound Designer
Liana Dognini Screenwriter
Mike Elliott Asst. Director
George Faber Producer
Mark Fenn Asst. Director
Richard Flynn Sound/Sound Designer
Des Hamilton Casting
Andras Hamori Executive Producer
Alwin Küchler Cinematographer
Barbara McKissack Executive Producer
Seaton McLean Executive Producer
Jane Morton Production Designer
Charles Pattinson Producer
Robyn Slovo Producer
David M. Thompson Executive Producer
Thomas Townend Camera Operator
Lucia Zucchetti Editor

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. The Boyfriend [7:31]
2. Christmas Presents [4:43]
3. Where's Dostoevsky? [2:45]
4. A Wild Party [7:29]
5. Visiting Gran [8:39]
6. A Novel By... [4:04]
7. Going on Holiday [2:38]
8. Burial [3:05]
9. Pals [6:18]
10. Off to Spain [4:19]
11. The Local Scene [6:43]
12. Consoling the Sad [4:58]
13. We're Leaving [6:53]
14. The Middle of Nowhere [7:03]
15. The Publishers [8:59]
16. Payment [2:50]
17. I'm Happy Here [4:32]
18. End Credits [3:45]

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Movern Callar 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this movie is not going to be for everyone, particularily the scene where she (morvern) dismembers the deceased, this however was my favourite scene as well as the following burial scene in the woods. there is a foreign/noir/french feel to this movie, very little dialogue and a beautiful, effortless naturalism in the filming each scene cuts neatly into the next, leading you involuntarily down a very twisted path.