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Of Mice and Men

( 4 )

Overview

Oscar-nominated for Best Picture in 1939, this classic cinematic adaptation of John Steinbeck's reflective literary masterpiece arrives on DVD courtesy of Image Entertainment. Featuring the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.33:1 accompanied by an English PCM audio track, the film as presented in this release is taken from a new film-to-tape transfer from the original 35 mm source elements, preserving this remarkable experience for future generations. See riveting performances by Lon Chaney Jr. and Burgess ...
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DVD (Black & White / Mono)
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Overview

Oscar-nominated for Best Picture in 1939, this classic cinematic adaptation of John Steinbeck's reflective literary masterpiece arrives on DVD courtesy of Image Entertainment. Featuring the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.33:1 accompanied by an English PCM audio track, the film as presented in this release is taken from a new film-to-tape transfer from the original 35 mm source elements, preserving this remarkable experience for future generations. See riveting performances by Lon Chaney Jr. and Burgess Meredith in director Lewis Milestone's touching tale of friendship, presented on DVD for the first time in this fine release.
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Special Features

[None specified]
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Bruce Eder
The fact that director Lewis Milestone had to sue, to enforce a contract, to get Of Mice And Men made, says a great deal about the movie and its director. Milestone was a filmmaker of many parts -- in the silent era, he had been known for his skills as a director of comedies, while with the dawn of sound films, he was responsible for one of the most enduring and serious dramas of the time, All Quiet On The Western Front (1930), which is among the earliest sound films that is considered easily watchable by modern audiences; and across the 1930's, he moved between romantic comedies (The Captain Hates The Sea) and serious, topical dramas (The General Died At Dawn). But it was with Of Mice And Men in 1939 that he came into his own as a stylist. Producer Hal Roach, who usually preferred comedic subjects, only agreed to make the movie in settlement of a lawsuit that Milestone had filed against him -- he ended up with one of the most prestigious movies ever to come out of Hal Roach Studios, nominated for four Academy Awards. Milestone knew what the property was worth, not just as a story but as a canvas, and it was with Of Mice And Men, that he truly came into his own as a stylist. This adaptation of John Steinbeck's short novel, appearing just two years after the book's publication, was released in the same year as John Ford's more prestigious and star-powered adaptation of the author's The Grapes Of Wrath, and yet it still managed to impress critics and audiences. The performances by Burgess Meredith as George and Lon Chaney, Jr. as Lenny (a role he had to maneuver and campaign for to earn a shot at) possess and immediacy that makes them seem like finely-honed theater work. And Milestone also got superb performances out of a supporting cast that included Bob Steele (essaying his first "serious" role, after years of playing in B-westerns), Betty Field, Charles Bickford, Noah Beery, Jr., Leigh Whipper, and Roman Bohnen. For many of those concerned, this movie would be some of the best work they ever did; with just a few lines in a very spare script, all of these players create memorable and finely-etched characters, that audiences know and understand in just a few frames, their work filling out the corners and background of this story in fine, full dramatic form. Composer Aaron Copland, then 39 years old and coming into the production on the late end (as film composers usually do), also rose to the occasion, on his first opportunity to score a movie. The result was a poetic and lyrical film that was perhaps a little less bravura than Ford's masterpiece, but no less haunting in its nuances and its overall impact. Milestone later tried to repeat the artistic success, working as an independent producer/director under the auspices of Republic Pictures, on The Red Pony, with slightly less impressive results.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/26/1998
  • UPC: 014381457124
  • Original Release: 1939
  • Rating:

  • Source: Image Entertainment
  • Region Code: 1
  • Aspect Ratio: Pre-1954 Standard (1.33.1)
  • Presentation: Black & White / Mono
  • Sound: monaural
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:46:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 7,797

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Burgess Meredith George Milton
Lon Chaney Jr. Lennie
Betty Field Mae
Charles Bickford Slim
Roman Bohnen Candy
Bob Steele Curley
Noah Beery Jr. Whit
Oscar O'Shea Jackson
Granville Bates Carlson
Leigh Whipper Crook
Helen Lynd Susie
Silver Tip Baker Old Hand
John Beach Ranch Hand
Baldwin Cooke
Eddie Dunn Bus Driver
Jack Lawrence Ranch Hand
Howard Mitchell Sheriff
Barbara Pepper 2nd Girl
Carl Pitti
Leona Roberts Aunt Clara
Technical Credits
Lewis Milestone Director, Producer
Norbert F. Brodin Cinematographer
Aaron Copland Score Composer
Bert Jordan Editor
Nicolai Remisoff Art Director
Frank Ross Associate Producer
Roy Seawright Special Effects
Eugene Solow Screenwriter
John Steinbeck Source Author
Nate Watt Asst. Director
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Scene Index

Side #1
0. Chapter Index
1. The Lynch Mob; Main Title [2:54]
2. George and Lennie [2:30]
3. At the Watering Hole [5:02]
4. The Dream [5:18]
5. Meeting the Boss [6:53]
6. Curley and Mae [5:02]
7. Slim [3:49]
8. A Pack of Trouble [3:39]
9. The Supper Bell [5:48]
10. Mae's Misery [3:01]
11. Candy's Dog [7:59]
12. Stir Crazy [4:57]
13. The New Partner [6:28]
14. Lennie Fights Back [3:24]
15. Saturday Night [1:44]
16. Crooks Supposes [7:04]
17. Mae Finds Out [5:45]
18. A Dance Hall in Bakersfield [2:39]
19. Lennie and Mae [8:36]
20. George's Discovery [3:36]
21. One Way Out [2:31]
22. The Hunt [2:52]
23. The Dream Is Over [3:32]
24. The Cast [:58]
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Menu

Side #1
   Feature Start
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    It is one of the best peices of literatur I've ever read

    The story starts off with George and Lennie arriving at the farm.
    Lennie, Candy, and Crook's talked about the dream and Crooks was about to join but racial remarks from Curley's wife stopped this from happening.
    The climax was the very moment Lennie killed Curley's wife which caused nearly everyone at the ranch to hunt him. At the brush near the river George found Lennie raised the Luger he stole from Carlson and he shot Lennie feeling it was the only way.
    I really Liked Of Mice And Men because even tough it was short compared to others I've read it had such meaning it took me 5 reads through the book to understand it all.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2004

    Definitely the best version!

    The 1939 version has a mood more recent versions find unattainable. This film captured the peak of the art so finely established in the black and white film era and provides lessons on presentation that are valuable to film makers of today. ...Truly a timeless classic!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews