One Million Years B.C.

One Million Years B.C.

3.0 1
Director: Don Chaffey, Raquel Welch, John Richardson, Percy Herbert

Cast: Don Chaffey, Raquel Welch, John Richardson, Percy Herbert

     
 
As part of the Raquel Welch Collection, the 1967 adventure One Million Years B.C. comes to DVD for the first time from Fox Home Entertainment with an anamorphic widescreen transfer. The Dolby Digital Stereo soundtrack is available in English and Spanish. English and Spanish subtitles are accessible. Special features include promotional trailers and a

Overview

As part of the Raquel Welch Collection, the 1967 adventure One Million Years B.C. comes to DVD for the first time from Fox Home Entertainment with an anamorphic widescreen transfer. The Dolby Digital Stereo soundtrack is available in English and Spanish. English and Spanish subtitles are accessible. Special features include promotional trailers and a five-minute restoration comparison.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
It's hard to suggest, without laughing, that even part of a movie like One Million Years B.C. might be considered "realistic." After all, its human characters fight turtles the size of apartment buildings, as well as actual dinosaurs and other dinosaur-like creatures -- which makes it just about the perfect Hammer Studios release. Given this, you'd think the filmmakers would just abandon all pretense of realism and have the characters speak to each other in English. But director Don Chaffey has enough commitment to scientific plausibility that his cavepeople communicate via grunts and other pre-linguistic babble. Did they think viewers would only care about looking at Raquel Welch in her iconic prehistoric bikini, and not about what she might have to say? In fact, the film's true role in cinematic history was to help establish Welch as a buzz-worthy commodity, after her breakout role in Richard Fleischer's Fantastic Voyage a couple months earlier. If it weren't for this star-making performance, the movie's 100 minutes would be even more interminable to sit through. Basic character relationships are established through a series of fights, banishments, reconciliations and betrayals, but there are only so many possible layers of complexity with this type of narrative. The movie basically moves from one bestial encounter to the next, with something that best resembles sideways momentum. At least the beasts themselves look good, as One Million Years B.C. finds effects wizard Ray Harryhausen at the top of his game. For modern viewers, the film is probably best appreciated as kitsch, and on that level, it satisfies well enough.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/09/2004
UPC:
0024543113119
Original Release:
1966
Rating:
NR
Source:
20th Century Fox
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital Mono, Dolby Digital Stereo]
Time:
1:31:00
Sales rank:
10,212

Special Features

Closed Caption; Theatrical Trailer; Restoration Comparison; "Fox Flix"

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Raquel Welch Loana
John Richardson Tumak
Percy Herbert Sakana
Robert Brown Akhoba
Martine Beswicke Nupondi
Lisa Thomas Sura
Jean Waldon Ahot
Malaya Nappi Tohana
Richard James Young Rock Man
William Lyon Brown Payto
Frank Hayden 1st Rock Man
Terence Maidment 1st Shell Man

Technical Credits
Don Chaffey Director
George Baker Original Story
George Blackwell Special Effects
Michael Carreras Producer,Screenwriter
Wilkie Cooper Cinematographer
Joseph Frickert Original Story
David Harcourt Camera Operator
Ray Harryhausen Special Effects
Robert Jones Art Director
Mario Nascimbene Score Composer
Mikell Novak Original Story
Wally Schneiderman Makeup
Tom Simpson Editor
Carl Toms Costumes/Costume Designer
Aida Young Associate Producer

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. A Story of Long Ago (Main Titles) [4:34]
2. The Rock Tribe [5:38]
3. Home From the Hunt [2:42]
4. Father Against Son [1:55]
5. The Dinosaur [:55]
6. A New World [2:12]
7. Lost [5:00]
8. Found [3:34]
9. The New Chief [3:07]
10. The Shell People [3:18]
11. Tumak the Hero [5:48]
12. Banished [4:45]
13. Tumak's Woman [2:07]
14. The Ape Men [4:31]
15. Battle of the Giants [2:22]
16. Against the Rock Tribe [1:36]
17. Loana vs. Nupondi [1:54]
18. New Ways of Life [5:25]
19. Carried Off [4:45]
20. Help From the Shell People [1:04]
21. War [2:39]
22. The Earthquake [3:32]
23. A New Tribe [3:19]
24. End Credits [4:47]

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One Million Years B.C. 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ChandlerSwain More than 1 year ago
"One Million Years B.C.", a remake of the 1940's Victor Mature prehistoric vehicle "One Million B.C.", is a film that defies serious criticism. After all, since it's general knowledge that dinosaurs and cave people did not co-exist and that it's very unlikely any cavegirl ever resembled the lovely Raquel Welch (she of the impeccably combed cavehair), there is little to inhibit suspension of belief unless the dinosaurs keep bumping into the scenery. Fortunately, in Don Chaffey's amusing film the interaction of giant lizards with cave dwellers is handled with great imagination by the gifted SFX wizard Ray Harryhausen. Now, in recent years it has been fashionable to negate the achievements of vintage special effects pictures with a smirking reference to the technological wonders of CGI, but one look at Harryhausen's creations dispel such insipid assertions, as the creatures in "One Million Years B.C." move and act with "personality", a unique trait of Harryhausen's stop-motion behemoths. Comparing these creatures with the (admittedly fine) dinosaurs of "Jurassic Park", Harryhausen's dinosaurs are full-fledged characters that think and hesitate and consider and enjoy their bouts of destruction. This is no small achievement, and marks the difference between a true artist and a merely skilled technician. The picture recounts the journey of Tumak (John Richardson from Hammer's "She") as he is banished from his tribe (the Rock People) due to tribal rivalries, and his subsequent discovery of the golden-haired Shell People and the lovely Loana (Ms. Welch). Both Richardson and Welch speak the gutteral cave language with a straight face and look very fit in their minimal casual cavewear. Two-time Bond girl Martine Beswicke is also on-hand as a dark haired beauty whose jealousy leads to a well-staged cat fight with Loana, and there are enough dinosaur battles, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes to appeal to the most jaded of Saturday matinee movie fanatics. The DVD is rather grainy (and a few minutes shorter than the European cut, this is the American theatrical release), more so in the SFX sequences.