Open City

( 2 )

Overview

This is one of those instances where the film's quality and historical significance make owning the disc close to mandatory, regardless of the lack of extras. Roberto Rossellini's neorealist classic Rome Open City comes to DVD with a standard full-frame transfer (as all film produced before 1955 should). The Italian soundtrack is rendered in Dolby Digital Stereo. English subtitles are accessible. The image was mastered from a 35 mm print and offers the best picture this fine ...
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Overview

This is one of those instances where the film's quality and historical significance make owning the disc close to mandatory, regardless of the lack of extras. Roberto Rossellini's neorealist classic Rome Open City comes to DVD with a standard full-frame transfer (as all film produced before 1955 should). The Italian soundtrack is rendered in Dolby Digital Stereo. English subtitles are accessible. The image was mastered from a 35 mm print and offers the best picture this fine film has ever had on home video.
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Special Features

[None specified]
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jonathan Crow
The first masterpiece of the post-war era, Roma, citta aperta is a cinematic landmark that heralded the rise of Italian Neorealism and influenced much of cinematic history to come, from the French New Wave to cinéma vérité and Direct Cinema to Third Cinema. Like The Cabinet of Caligari (1919), Open City is a masterwork born out of deprivation. The Nazis had vacated the city a mere two months before director Roberto Rossellini commenced shooting; only grainy low-grade stock was available; and most of Rome's studios were bombed out from the war. In most cases, any of these factors would have doomed the production, yet Rosselini brilliantly managed to take seeming liabilities and adapt them into a gritty re-definition of cinematic realism. He took the film out into the street and cast non-actors in central roles, giving the film immediacy and authenticity. In a tactic that would later be a model for much of Italian cinema, he shot Open City without sound, allowing his camera crews greater mobility. Moreover, he infused the film with a humanism that would be a signature of Rosselini's career and would mark much of immediate post-war film, from Vittorio De Sica's Ladri di biciclette to Akira Kurosawa's Ikiru. Roma, citta aperta is a harrowing, emotionally powerful film that changed the face of cinema.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 11/5/1997
  • UPC: 014381410228
  • Original Release: 1945
  • Rating:

  • Source: Image Entertainment
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Black & White
  • Language: Italiano
  • Time: 1:45:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Vito Annicchiarico Marcello
Nando Bruno Agostino
Aldo Fabrizi Don Pietro Pellegrini
Harry Feist Capt. Bergmann
Anna Magnani Pina
Giovanna Galletti Ingrid
Maria Michi Marina Mari
Francesco Grandjacquet Francesco
Marcello Pagliero Giorgio Manfredi
Eduardo Passanelli Sergeant
Carla Revere Lauretta
C. Sindici Chief of Police
Akos Tolnay Austrian Deserter
Joop van Hulzen Hartmann
Amalia Pellegrini Boarding house's owner
Technical Credits
Roberto Rossellini Director, Producer, Screenwriter
Sergio Amidei Screenwriter
Ubaldo Arata Cinematographer
Pietro DiDonato Editor
Federico Fellini Screenwriter
Eraldo Da Roma Editor
Renzo Rossellini Score Composer
Herman Weinberg Editor
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Scene Index

Chapter Info
0. Chapter Info
1. Main Title; Nazi Man Hunt [7:25]
2. Bread Riots [6:02]
3. A Common Enemy [8:37]
4. Sedation As Seduction [9:57]
5. Heroes and Traitors [6:44]
6. Adopted Families [4:13]
7. The Soft Voice of Betrayal [3:16]
8. Wrong Way Wedding Day [5:00]
9. Last Rites Misread [4:02]
10. Pina Is Shot [2:32]
11. Slaughtering Lambs [3:40]
12. A Rendezvous With Deceit [7:58]
13. The Capture [5:32]
14. Entering the Halls of Torture [3:45]
15. Vows of Silence [8:40]
16. Master Race to Death [2:49]
17. Until the End [7:27]
18. A Holy Sacrifice [5:11]
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Menu

   Menu Group #1 with 18 chapter(s) covering 01:42:58
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    On Open City

    Roberto RosselliniÕs classic 1945 movie masterpiece, Open City, was a sad story with a very sad ending, since the film's chief characters, Pina, Giorgio Manfredi, and Don Pietro Pellegrini all die in the film. The message I got from the film is that no matter how terribly innocent and courageous people suffer at the hands of their cruel and inhuman captors, good ultimately triumphs over evil. It also gave me a taste of Nazi cruelty and vividly showed the nobleness and dignity of those resistance fighters who absolutely refused to reveal the identity of their comrades fearing that they would suffer the same fate as them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2001

    On Open City

    Roberto RosselliniÕs classic 1945 movie masterpiece, Open City, was a sad story with a very sad ending, since the film's chief characters, Pina, Giorgio Manfredi, and Don Pietro Pellegrini all die in the film. The message I got from the film is that no matter how terribly innocent and courageous people suffer at the hands of their cruel and inhuman captors, good ultimately triumphs over evil. It also gave me a taste of Nazi cruelty and vividly showed the nobleness and dignity of those resistance fighters who absolutely refused to reveal the identity of their comrades fearing that they would suffer the same fate as them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews