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Palindromes
     

Palindromes

3.0 2
Director: Todd Solondz

Cast: Ellen Barkin, Stephen Adly-Guirgis, Jennifer Jason Leigh

 
Palindromes opens with the dedication, "In loving memory of Dawn Wiener", a reference to the lead character in writer/director Todd Solondz' early feature, Welcome to the Dollhouse. Aviva has just attended Dawn's funeral. Dismayed by her older cousin's untimely death, Aviva asks her mother (Ellen Barkin) for assurance that she won't grow up to be like

Overview

Palindromes opens with the dedication, "In loving memory of Dawn Wiener", a reference to the lead character in writer/director Todd Solondz' early feature, Welcome to the Dollhouse. Aviva has just attended Dawn's funeral. Dismayed by her older cousin's untimely death, Aviva asks her mother (Ellen Barkin) for assurance that she won't grow up to be like Dawn. Aviva only dreams of one thing -- having babies. Lots and lots of babies. As a teen, while Aviva has no interest in sex, she eagerly loses her virginity to Judah (Robert Agri), the son of a family friend in hopes of getting pregnant. She does, but her mother insists that she have an abortion. Worse yet, due to a complication during the procedure, the doctor is forced to perform a hysterectomy. Unaware of her medical condition, Aviva runs away from home and is picked up by a truck driver (Stephen Adly Guirgis) who has his way with her and then abandons her at a roadside motel. She wanders in the wilderness until she meets up with Jiminy (Tyler Maynard), a friendly boy who lives with the "Sunshine Family," a group of disabled kids cared for by the cheerful Mama Sunshine (Debra Monk). The kids are also a Christian singing group. Aviva is happy until she learns that Mama Sunshine and her husband are virulently anti-abortion and that they are planning to murder a doctor. Solondz cast eight different actors in the lead role, each of whom play Aviva at different points in the story. Matthew Faber reprises the role of Mark Wiener from Welcome to the Dollhouse. Palindromes was shot at Bard College in upstate New York, using many film students as crew. It was selected by the Film Society of Lincoln Center for inclusion in the 2004 New York Film Festival.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/13/2005
UPC:
0720917546629
Original Release:
2004
Rating:
NR
Source:
Fox Lorber
Region Code:
1
Sound:
[Dolby Digital Stereo, Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Time:
1:40:00

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Ellen Barkin Joyce
Stephen Adly-Guirgis Joe/Bob/Earl
Jennifer Jason Leigh Aviva
Emani Sledge Aviva
Valerie Shusterov Aviva
Hannah Freiman Aviva
Rachel Corr Aviva
Will Denton Aviva
Sharon Wilkins Aviva
Shayna Levine Aviva
Richard Masur Actor
Debra Monk Mama Sunshine
Matthew Faber Mark Wiener
Robert Agri Judah
John Gemberling Judah
Stephen Singer Actor
Alexander Brickel Peter Paul
Walter Bobbie Bo Sunshine
Richard Riehle Dr. Dan
Chris Penn Actor

Technical Credits
Todd Solondz Director,Screenwriter
Timothy Bird Associate Producer
David Doernberg Production Designer
Victoria Farrell Costumes/Costume Designer
Chris Gebert Sound/Sound Designer
Mollie Goldstein Editor
Ann Goulder Casting
Heather Grierson Asst. Director
Susan Jacobs Musical Direction/Supervision
Nathan Larson Score Composer
Kevin Messman Editor
Tom Richmond Cinematographer
Mike S. Ryan Producer
Derrick Tseng Producer

Scene Index

Disc #1 --
1. Dawn [5:01]
2. Judah [6:24]
3. Henry [16:08]
4. Henrietta [6:50]
5. Huckleberry [2:11]
6. Mama Sunshine [28:07]
7. Bob [16:23]
8. Mark [8:49]
9. Aviva [10:00]

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Palindromes 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I don't understand why they used several actresses to play one part. There was a good story underneath all that "creativity" and i think it would have flowed much better with one actress. I got a kick out of the christian family, and the exageration of each character, both comically and tragically. I could relate to the little girl's desire to be a mom, and remembered, as a teenager, writing down the baby names that i liked best. For reasons such as these, i really tried to like this film. Ellen barkin's character, was so 'in my face'...But i guess that was so i could relate to her daughter...Which would have been easier if i knew who she was.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago