BN.com Gift Guide

Pandora and the Flying Dutchman

( 1 )

Overview

For many years, Albert Lewin's 1951 film Pandora and The Flying Dutchman was nearly as legendary as its title character. Despite a radiantly sensual performance by Ava Gardner and an impassioned portrayal by James Mason, most American filmgoers found its myth-laden plot and strangely remote European setting not to their taste; the movie vanished from theaters very quickly and was seldom shown on television, and by the 1960s it had disappeared. It did have a small but loyal cult following and, perhaps even more ...
See more details below
This DVD (Pan & Scan / Mono) is Not Available through BN.com

Overview

For many years, Albert Lewin's 1951 film Pandora and The Flying Dutchman was nearly as legendary as its title character. Despite a radiantly sensual performance by Ava Gardner and an impassioned portrayal by James Mason, most American filmgoers found its myth-laden plot and strangely remote European setting not to their taste; the movie vanished from theaters very quickly and was seldom shown on television, and by the 1960s it had disappeared. It did have a small but loyal cult following and, perhaps even more significantly, a serious body of potential viewers who were curious about this movie, which showed up on Gardner's and Mason's filmographies and several lists of notable fantasy films, but was nowhere to be seen. The plot itself, told as an extended flashback, is one of the stranger stories to be aimed at mainstream audiences in the 1950s. Ava Gardner plays a free-spirited singer who finds herself attracted to an enigmatic Dutch painter (James Mason), who arrives aboard a yacht that seems oddly devoid of a crew. As it turns out, he is the real Flying Dutchman of legend, cursed to sail the seven seas forever, until he finds one who will offer herself in sacrifice for him. Neither performer ever looked better, and this is arguably the best performance of Gardner's career -- certainly right up there with her work in Mogambo and Seven Days in May. The movie resurfaced a few years ago courtesy of Kino International, which acquired it from the estate of the late Raymond Rohauer, a film collector who had acquired the rights, and it emerged on DVD in early 2000. In contrast to such British Technicolor of the same period as The Red Shoes and The Tales of Hoffmann, Pandora and the Flying Dutchman hasn't enjoyed a full-blown restoration of its negative elements. It looks very uneven, with hues and skin tones shifting within several scenes, and marks on some stretches of the movie, particularly the reel-change points. On the other hand, the color is generally robust and the clarity is impressive; it's obvious that a lot of effort went into making the most of the 35 mm nitrate source that was used. Moreover, the audio quality is very high, which gives full play to the richness of Alan Rawsthorne's score as well as the dialogue. The movie is broken down into 25 chapters and comes with the original trailer as a supplement. The menu must be accessed manually.
Read More Show Less

Special Features

movie trailer
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
Albert Lewin's Pandora and the Flying Dutchman has a tendency to evoke quite differing reactions from people. Those who don't buy into dismiss it as very pretty but pretentious pap, citing its arch and artificial dialogue, its tendency to overstate and then re-overstate the obvious, and a generally florid style as their reasons for not giving Dutchman the time of day. There's definitely validity to their points, but those who can look past these flaws will find Dutchman a strangely haunting picture. It's a pure fantasy, but of the romantic rather than childlike variety, and the simple folkloric tragedy that forms its core is quite intriguing. Yes, the dialogue does get in the way, but even the overwritten style plays a key part in establishing Lewin's tone and mood. And cinematographer Jack Cardiff's sensational work goes far beyond creating "pretty pictures." This is a film in which the cinematography is absolutely essential, creating not just a tone but an actual texture. The riot of color, the use of space, the angles that provoke psychological insight are every bit as, if not more, important than the words that the film employs. Dutchman also benefits from a masterful and absorbing performance from James Mason at the height of his brooding best. Ava Gardner is perhaps not totally up to the task given her; she's much better in the first half of the film than in the second, when she is called upon to give herself up totally to the heightened demands of love. But she is stunningly beautiful throughout, and in Dutchman, that counts for a lot.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 5/23/2000
  • UPC: 738329016326
  • Original Release: 1951
  • Rating:

  • Source: Kino Video
  • Region Code: 0
  • Aspect Ratio: Pre-1954 Standard (1.33.1)
  • Presentation: Pan & Scan / Mono
  • Sound: monaural
  • Language: English
  • Time: 2:03:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
James Mason Hendrick van der Zee
Ava Gardner Pandora Reynolds
Nigel Patrick Stephen Cameron
Sheila Sim Janet Fielding
Marius Goring Reggie Demarest
Harold Warrender Geoffrey Fielding
Mario Cabre Juan Montalvo
John Laurie Angus
Patricia Raine Peggy Ford
Marguerite D'Alvarez Senora Montalvo
La Pillina Dancer
Abraham Sofaer Judge
Lily Molnar Geoffrey's Housekeeper
Antonio Martin Member of Montalvo's Quadrilla
Eddie Leslie Doctor
Christina Forbes Nurse
Pamela Mason Jenny
Technical Credits
Albert Lewin Director, Producer, Screenwriter
John Bryan Art Director
Jack Cardiff Cinematographer
Dr. Hubert Clifford Musical Direction/Supervision
Beatrice Dawson Costumes/Costume Designer
W. Percy Day Special Effects
John Hawkesworth Set Decoration/Design
Tim Hopewell-Ash Art Director
Joseph Kaufman Producer
Ralph Kemplen Editor
Alan Rawsthorne Score Composer, Musical Direction/Supervision
Julia Squire Costumes/Costume Designer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews