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Pearl Jam Twenty
     

Pearl Jam Twenty

4.8 4
Director: Cameron Crowe

Cast: Cameron Crowe

 

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In honor of Pearl Jam’s twentieth anniversary, Academy Award-winning director and music journalist Cameron Crowe created a definitive portrait of the seminal band carved from over 1,200 hours of rarely and never-before-seen footage, plus 24 hours of recently shot concert and interview footage. Pearl Jam Twenty chronicles the years leading up to the band’s

Overview

In honor of Pearl Jam’s twentieth anniversary, Academy Award-winning director and music journalist Cameron Crowe created a definitive portrait of the seminal band carved from over 1,200 hours of rarely and never-before-seen footage, plus 24 hours of recently shot concert and interview footage. Pearl Jam Twenty chronicles the years leading up to the band’s formation, the chaos that ensued soon after their rise to mega-stardom, their step back from center stage, and the creation of a trusted circle that would surround them -- giving way to a work culture that would sustain them. Told in big themes and bold colors with blistering sound, the film is carved from over 1,200 hours of footage spanning the band’s career. Pearl Jam Twenty is the definitive portrait of Pearl Jam: part concert film, part intimate insider-hang, part testimonial to the power of music and uncompromising artists.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Perry Seibert
For all the gossipy fun of VH1's Behind the Music, the program killed the public's taste for detailed histories of rock bands. Tales of excess -- focusing on egos, drugs, alcohol, and sex -- became the norm. One of the best things about Cameron Crowe's Pearl Jam Twenty is that it foregoes tabloid sensationalism in favor of explaining the cultural, personal, and artistic forces that came together to produce one of the most-influential bands of the grunge era -- all the while letting the guys in the band speak for themselves. The movie spends nearly its first quarter painting a portrait of the rich and supportive Seattle music scene of the late '80s; it was a time when bands like Soundgarden, the Melvins, and dozens of others did their best to support each other creatively and financially, as opposed to the bands in New York and L.A., who we are told would go out of their way to stab each other in the back. If nothing else, Pearl Jam Twenty would be invaluable as a look at this unique moment in rock history. But thankfully, it's much more than a lecture in Grunge History 101. By explaining how the death of Mother Love Bone's lead singer Andrew Wood broke the hearts of his bandmates Stone Gossard and Jeff Ament, Crowe delivers a powerful portrait of how friends deal with grief. Then, when Eddie Vedder sends in an audition tape for Ament and Gossard's next project, we watch as their lives change again -- this time for the better (at least more often than not). Even then, Crowe takes his time. Where most filmmakers would jump at the chance to revel in a band enjoying their first taste of mega-success, he patiently explains how Vedder slowly earned the trust and respect of his bandmates and the rest of the Seattle scene by paying tribute to Wood's memory, and by quickly proving himself as a formidable frontman in his own right, as well as a talented lyricist. With access to hundreds of hours of private footage, Crowe deftly selects moments that keep this emotionally rich tale alive. There's an affecting mix of history and immediacy through much of the film, a tone achieved in large part thanks to the fact that Gossard, Ament, Vedder, and fellow bandmate Mike McCready don't seem particularly nostalgic about these early years. They're all funny, honest, and sentimental in their own way, but none of them are pining for the tumultuous, heady times when they first played for 100,000 people or got to perform on MTV's Headbangers Ball. Unafraid to share some of the band's darkest moments, the movie contains footage of a dreadful gig they played to hype the opening of Singles, a romantic comedy directed by Cameron Crowe that Pearl Jam appeared in, and the band members talk openly about how the shifting power dynamics -- Gossard was the undisputed leader early on, but Vedder slowly emerged as the overseer of the band's identity -- led to tensions that nearly ended the group. All of this is presented with such affection for the band members that the movie will work for viewers too young or too old to have an attachment to grunge in general or Pearl Jam specifically. You'll grow to be interested in them as people, even if you didn't grow up with their songs as the soundtrack of your teenage years. After the artistic dead end of Elizabethtown, it's a kick to see Cameron Crowe recharge his creative batteries by going back to his rock-journalist roots and making documentaries about musicians. His Elton John film, The Union, was a small but warmly affectionate look at the legendary performer as he created an album with one of his idols, Leon Russell. Pearl Jam Twenty, however, is more ambitious than The Union without being any less enamored of its subjects. Clear-eyed, warmhearted humanism is what Crowe has always done best, and Pearl Jam Twenty proves Crowe hasn't entirely abandoned his muse. For that reason, it plays as well for movie lovers as it does for music fans.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/24/2011
UPC:
0886979609990
Original Release:
2011
Source:
Sony
Region Code:
0
Sound:
[stereo, Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Time:
2:00:00
Sales rank:
19,336

Special Features

Mike McCready writing "Faithful"; Jeff Ament in Montana; Stone Gossard Seattle Driving Tour; Boom Gaspar Joins the Band ; Eddie Vedder House Tour; Matt Cameron Writing "The Fixer"; "No Anything"; "Come Back"

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Pearl Jam Twenty
1. Seattle, 1989 [5:08]
2. His Name Was Andy Wood - Stardog Champion [6:32]
3. Lightning Strikes Twice- Times Of Trouble/Footsteps [4:13]
4. The Sixth Day - Alive [2:40]
5. We Were Strangers - Release [3:28]
6. Sense Of Community - Reach Down/Hunger Strike [4:26]
7. Mookie Knows We're Changing The Name - Breath And A Scream/Why Go [5:02]
8. The First Unplugged - Garden/Jeremy/Porch/Black [2:49]
9. Lollapalooza - Baba O'Riley [2:27]
10. Conceptual Video - Jeremy [2:43]
11. We're Used To Playing Clubs - Even Flow/Porch [4:53]
12. Daughter On The Bus - Brother (Daughter) [2:16]
13. The Birth Of No - State Of Love And Trust [3:10]
14. Let's Keep Things Rolling, Tab - Overblown [3:48]
15. Fucking Circus - Blood [3:34]
16. Don't Hurt Me - Indifference [3:50]
17. Faceless - Last Exit [3:55]
18. Uncle Neil - Rockin' In The Free World [2:15]
19. The Powers That Be - Spin The Black Circle /Not For You [6:41]
20. Something In The Basement - Do The Evolution [5:11]
21. Big Sandy - Thumbing My Way [3:51]
22. In Touch With The Good Stuff - Nothing As It Seems [2:42]
23. Great Look, Good Drummer/Binaural - Of The Girl [3:59]
24. Roskilde - Inside Job [2:18]
25. The Beginning Of What - Crown Of Thorns [5:13]
26. It's Okay To Get Booed - Bu$hleaguer [2:19]
27. Dependably Unpredictable - Faithful [2:10]
28. Influences - The Seeker [1:45]
29. Pure Stoke - Let Me Sleep [1:50]
30. Communal Exchange - Better Man [1:36]
31. It's Different Every Night - Alive [6:12]
32. Credits - Walk With Me/Just Breathe [5:58]

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Pearl Jam Twenty 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
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