Pierrot Le Fou

( 3 )

Overview

Pierrot le fou 1965 is Jean-Luc Godard's sixth film staring Anna Karina, his first wife. It is the story of Ferdinand Jean-Paul Belmondo and Marianne Karina. They meet when Ferdinand's wife hires Marianne as a baby-sitter. As he drives Marianne home, Ferdinand decides to run away with her. The couple get caught up in a mysterious gun-running scheme involving Marianne's brother Dirk Sanders. With Pierrot le fou Godard returns to the story of A bout de souffle Breathless: the tale of a couple on the run. But in the...
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Overview

Pierrot le fou 1965 is Jean-Luc Godard's sixth film staring Anna Karina, his first wife. It is the story of Ferdinand Jean-Paul Belmondo and Marianne Karina. They meet when Ferdinand's wife hires Marianne as a baby-sitter. As he drives Marianne home, Ferdinand decides to run away with her. The couple get caught up in a mysterious gun-running scheme involving Marianne's brother Dirk Sanders. With Pierrot le fou Godard returns to the story of A bout de souffle Breathless: the tale of a couple on the run. But in the six years between the two films Godard developed a more complex and often difficult style. Pierrot le fou incorporates musical numbers, references to the history of cinema and painting, and quotations from literature. The film features Godard's most extended use of color to that point, as the shots are filled with blocks of bright primary colors. Pierrot le fou is a catalogue of cinematic inventions and of gestures made by couples in love.
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Steve Futterman
Jean-Luc Godard’s Pierrot Le Fou is many things -- none of which you can quite put your finger on. A giddy thriller, a political polemic masquerading as a musical, a love story that’s also a discourse on art; this 1965 masterpiece finds its fabled director just about to ford the stream to where radical politics, and equally radical film form, take precedence over relative accessibility. Not that Pierrot hand-holds the viewer. As was his manner in the first near-decade of his career, Godard indulges freely in the elliptical, the outrageously cartoonish, and the didactic, breaking the illusionary Fourth Wall with impunity. Plot becomes secondary to the disparate musings of the director as voiced by his filmic counterparts, the glorious duo of Jean-Paul Belmondo and Anna Karina, Godard’s wife at the time. Saturated in bombastically beautiful color by way of Raoul Coutard’s eye-popping cinematography, Pierrot, and the following year’s Masculin/Feminine, cap off an audacious run of signature Godard works that commenced with the big bang of Breathless in 1959. Very much of its time -- critical jabs at the Vietnam War and American cultural and economic imperialism run rampant throughout -- Pierrot is simultaneously an irreverent, riotously funny critique of bourgeois life and an elemental, poignant account of a relationship running into the ground. No wonder Godard’s early work remains the template for contemporary directors who still gaze in wonder at how effortlessly he kept so many balls in the air at once, all the while giving the appearance that he was improvising the whole shoot on the fly. Admire Tarantino and his ilk all you will, but never overlook the daddy of them all.
All Movie Guide - Lucia Bozzola
Based on Lionel White's novel Obsession, Jean-Luc Godard's Pierrot le Fou (1965) transforms a story about a couple on the run into an existential romance and an essay on the possibilities of film. With no script, Jean-Paul Belmondo's and Anna Karina's flight to southern France becomes a spontaneous series of incidents that reflect on romance, aesthetics, story-telling, and art as an antidote to alienation. Equating men with the intellect and women with the body, and using the widescreen frame to emphasize the couple's psychic division, Godard unites them in romantic moments and musical numbers, but these gestures cannot prevent their final, explosive separation. Stylized colors and compositions celebrate art for art's sake (even though the colors also carry potential meaning), as in the repetition of the couple's response to a murder in three different shooting styles. Allusions to other films, the brief appearance of Hollywood tough-guy director Samuel Fuller, and references to writers, writing, and painters all emphasize Godard's concern with the meaning of cinema and art, and their place in life. Though not as popular as its predecessor Alphaville (1965), Pierrot le Fou won the Critics' Prize at the 1965 Venice Film Festival, and it was a key precursor to his most radical 1960s film, Weekend (1968).
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 3/15/2010
  • EAN: 5055201810700
  • Original Release: 1965
  • Rating:

  • Source: Ais
  • Time: 1:50:00
  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Sales rank: 49,136

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Jean-Paul Belmondo Ferdinand Griffon, "Pierrot"
Anna Karina Marianne, Marianne Ronoir
Dirk Sanders Fred, Marianne's Brother
Raymond Devos Man on the Pier
Graziella Galvani Ferdinand's Wife
Roger Dutoit Gangster
Princess Aicha Abidir Herself
Pascal Aubier 2nd Brother
Samuel Fuller Himself
Pierre Hanin 3rd Brother
Jimmy Karoubi Dwarf
Jean-Pierre Léaud Young Man in Movie Theatre
Hans Meyer Gangster
Krista Nell Mme. Staquet
Alexis Poliakoff Sailor
Laszlo Szabo Political Exile from Santo Domingo
Technical Credits
Jean-Luc Godard Director, Screenwriter
Boris Bassiak Songwriter
Francoise Collin Editor
Raoul Coutard Cinematographer
Georges de Beauregard Producer
Antoine Duhamel Score Composer
Pierre Guffroy Art Director
Jean-Pierre Léaud Asst. Director
René Levert Sound/Sound Designer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    great

    this is one of the best ever

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted November 10, 2013

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    Posted July 29, 2009

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    Posted August 16, 2009

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