Pirates of the Caribbean - The Curse of the Black Pearl

Pirates of the Caribbean - The Curse of the Black Pearl

4.8 314
Director: Gore Verbinski

Cast: Gore Verbinski, Johnny Depp, Geoffrey Rush, Orlando Bloom

     
 

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Disney DVD gives their sprawling swashbuckler a feature-packed release that is sure to give both your DVD player and PC a workout. Presented in its original 2.35:1 aspect ratio, the film transfer is nothing short of perfection. While some may doubt the ability of such a large-scale film to transfer suitably to television, the sharp image and beautiful colors do so… See more details below

Overview

Disney DVD gives their sprawling swashbuckler a feature-packed release that is sure to give both your DVD player and PC a workout. Presented in its original 2.35:1 aspect ratio, the film transfer is nothing short of perfection. While some may doubt the ability of such a large-scale film to transfer suitably to television, the sharp image and beautiful colors do so with ease and grace. From the creepy moonlit scenes to the sparkling treasure cave, the colors are bright, vivid, and spectacular. With sound options that include THX-optimized DTS and Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround, Disney DVD has offered viewers a vivid soundscape that perfectly compliments the visual presentation. The DTS soundtrack, in particular, will have viewers ducking under their coffee tables to avoid cannon fire. It seems only once or twice a year that a DVD comes along that truly redefines what can be accomplished on the format, and this is no doubt one of those discs. This release of Pirates of the Caribbean is virtually overflowing with great extra features, and viewers may need a free weekend just to navigate their way through its wealth of materials. Starting off with three separate commentary tracks, viewers will likely want to start with director Gore Verbinski and star Johnny Depp's amusing and informative recollection of the film's production. Though it may not be the most technical commentary, the two play well off of one another, and the result in an interesting and informative track. Producer Jerry Bruckheimer provides a bit more detailed take on the production, and stars Keira Knightley and Jack Davenport check in with what is definitely the most amusing commentary track. It's obvious that the two stars are comfortable with each other, and hearing them joke around as they recall the exhausting shoot is a blast. Writers Ted Elliot, Terry Rossio, Stuart Beattie, and Jay Wolpert's commentary provides notable insight on how the screenplay changed from draft to draft (and script to screen), though one gets the impression that they're stepping on each other's toes a bit to get a word in, and the result is a bit crowded. "An Epic at Sea: The Making of Pirates of the Caribbean" checks in at about 40 minutes and covers everything from location scouting to the spectacular Disneyland premiere of the film. "Fly on the Set" takes a look at both the director in action and how the filmmakers managed their many cinematic feats and sleights of hand. If one wishes to explore the life of actual pirates they need look no further than the "Below Deck" feature, which actually takes viewers aboard a pirate ship to explore the true-life tales of history's most notorious seafaring scallywags. From Blackbeard to Sir Francis Drake to women pirates and Chinese pirates, this informative feature utilizes interviews with maritime historian David Cordingly and film clips and is one of the most fascinating and insightful features on the disc. The accompanying feature, "A Prisoner's Last Tale," also speaks with Cordingly to provide detailed insight on the day-to-day life of a pirate. "Diary of a Pirate" consists of a "Producer's Photo Diary" (which is also narrated by Bruckheimer), a video journal by star Lee Arenberg and a detailed study of the brig Lady Washington (which served as The Interceptor in the film). Deleted scenes mostly offer a more intimate look at the characters, and a blooper reel collects some of the most amusing on-camera flubs. After viewers take a detailed look at one of the film's most entertainingly frightful scenes in "Moonlight Serenade," an image gallery offers production sketches, storyboards, and production and publicity photos. The vintage promotional short "Pirates in the Park" takes them on a nostalgic ride through the actual Disneyland attraction. If viewers aren't entirely exhausted by this point, the DVD-ROM features are sure to do them in. From an effects studio to a virtual reality viewer and storyboard viewer, these intense interactive features will truly put your home PC to the test (the DVD-ROM features will not work on Macintosh computers). From the serious film student to the curious youngster, this release has something for everyone. A must-have for DVD fanatics and fans of the film alike.

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Kryssa Schemmerling
Just when it seemed the pirate movie was moribund, along comes Johnny Depp to revive it, playing one of the wildest buccaneers to ever grace the screen. It’s all the more startling to find this witty, wonderfully eccentric performance in a summer blockbuster produced by action maven Jerry Bruckheimer (Pearl Harbor) and based on, of all things, a Disney theme park ride. What sounded like a recipe for a Cutthroat Island-style disaster turns out to be a thoroughly enjoyable romp in the grand swashbuckling tradition. The setting is the 18th-century West Indies, and Depp is Jack Sparrow, a down-on-his-luck pirate recruited by a handsome blacksmith (Orlando Bloom) to rescue the governor’s beautiful daughter (Bend It Like Beckham’s Keira Knightly) from the clutches of a deadly band of pirates. Led by Captain Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush, in a juicy turn), these black-hearted sea dogs are operating under a curse -- they are actually the living dead, who, under moonlight, are revealed to be skeletons. This plot twist adds a nice dash of the supernatural, and the bouts of moonlit swordplay are a ghoulish delight, thanks to first-rate special effects. But the real kick in Pirates of the Caribbean is watching Depp strut and mince in a characterization reportedly inspired by rock ‘n’ roller Keith Richards. Heavily mascaraed, dreadlocked, and effeminate, Depp seems to be subtly acknowledging the homosexuality that was part of the pirate tradition (though not in classic Hollywood swashbucklers). Not that this welcome hint of subversion in any way detracts from the film’s old-fashioned, PG appeal. Despite being a wee bit long at two-plus hours, Pirates of the Caribbean is a joyous and unexpected return to the adventure movies of yore, anchored by a memorable star turn.
All Movie Guide
Pirate films have been a curse on cinema for a quite a while in recent years (Cutthroat Island, anyone?), and outside of releasing Pixar flicks, Disney hadn't been doing any better quality-wise, so when Gore Verbenski (fresh off The Ring remake) and virtuoso Johnny Depp came aboard the beloved adaptation of the Pirates of the Caribbean theme-park ride, eyebrows were definitely raised. So how does it stack up? Well, in a time of massive summer blockbusters, this high-sailing ship is definitely a crowd-pleaser. The scale is huge, with technical brilliance in front and behind the camera, while swords clash, cannons roar, and wit is dished out at every corner. Following a kind of Stephen Sommers' Mummy-esque tradition, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl has "lighthearted" written all over it, no small thanks to Depp's brilliantly over-the-top creation, Captain Jack Sparrow. Mix Keith Richards and Depp's Hunter S. Thompson together and you're about halfway there with this brilliantly wild performance. Turning in another juicy role is Geoffrey Rush as the cursed Captain Barbossa, a dastardly villain whom Rush was no doubt meant to play. Also worth mentioning are heartthrobs Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley as the film's love interests. Knightley perks it up as the spunky female lead just fine, though Bloom's soft-spoken manner and delivery are frankly starting to wear thin outside of his Legolas gig. The ILM skeletal effects are well done and neat, especially in the final sword fight between Sparrow and Barbossa (where columns of light are used ingeniously in the final effect). For all the thrilling moments though, Pirates is hobbled by one thing: its running time. Well over two hours, it's just flat out too long. Thankfully, with zombie monkey skeletons and Depp virtually stealing the show, the film still manages to deliver. So take the kids, put up your feet, and sing "Yo Ho," for this is one Disney pirate flick that surprisingly does not disappoint. Jeremy Wheeler
All Movie Guide - Jeremy Wheeler
Pirate films have been a curse on cinema for a quite a while in recent years (Cutthroat Island, anyone?), and outside of releasing Pixar flicks, Disney hadn't been doing any better quality-wise -- so when Gore Verbinski (fresh off The Ring remake) and virtuoso Johnny Depp came aboard the beloved adaptation of the Pirates of the Caribbean theme-park ride, eyebrows were definitely raised. So how does it stack up? Well, in a time of massive summer blockbusters, this high-sailing ship is definitely a crowd-pleaser. The scale is huge, with technical brilliance in front and behind the camera, while swords clash, cannons roar, and wit is dished out at every corner. Following a kind of Stephen Sommers' Mummy-esque tradition, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl has "lighthearted" written all over it, no small thanks to Depp's brilliantly over-the-top creation, Captain Jack Sparrow. Mix Keith Richards and Depp's Hunter S. Thompson together and you're about halfway there with this brilliantly wild performance. Turning in another juicy role is Geoffrey Rush as the cursed Captain Barbossa, a dastardly villain whom Rush was no doubt meant to play. Also worth mentioning are heartthrobs Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley as the film's love interests. Knightley perks it up as the spunky female lead just fine, though Bloom's soft-spoken manner and delivery are frankly starting to wear thin outside of his Legolas gig. The ILM skeletal effects are well done and neat, especially in the final sword fight between Sparrow and Barbossa (where columns of light are used ingeniously in the final effect). For all the thrilling moments though, Pirates is hobbled by one thing -- its running time. Well over two hours, it's just flat out too long. Thankfully, with zombie monkey skeletons and Depp virtually stealing the show, the film still manages to deliver. So take the kids, put up your feet, and sing "Yo Ho," for this is one Disney pirate flick that surprisingly does not disappoint.
New York Times
The movie is better than it deserves to be, given its origins: a ride at Disneyland and Disney World. Elvis Mitchell
USA Today
Pirates will enthrall kids and amuse adults. Claudia Puig,

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Product Details

Release Date:
12/02/2003
UPC:
0786936224306
Original Release:
2005
Rating:
PG13
Source:
Walt Disney Video
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[DTS 5.1-Channel Surround Sound, THX-Supervised Mastering, Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Time:
2:23:00
Sales rank:
2,065

Special Features

Audio commentaries; "An Epic at Sea: The Making Of Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl;" deleted scenes; "Moonlight" scene progression; image gallery; blooper reel; "Below Deck: An Interactive History of Pirates; more.

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Johnny Depp Jack Sparrow
Geoffrey Rush Captain Barbossa
Orlando Bloom Will Turner
Keira Knightley Elizabeth Swann
Jack Davenport Norrington
Kevin McNally Joshamee Gibbs
Jonathan Pryce Governor Swann
Zoe Saldana Anamaria
Treva Etienne Koehler
David Bailie Cotton
Lee Arenberg Pintel
Mackenzie Crook Ragetti
Trevor Goddard Grapple
Isaac C. Singleton Bosun
Brye Cooper Mallot
Greg Ellis Officer Groves
Martin Klebba Marty
Lauren Maher Scarlett
Paula Jane Newman Esterlla
Dylan Smith Young Will Turner

Technical Credits
Gore Verbinski Director
Arthur Schmidt Editor
Bob Badami Musical Direction/Supervision
Klaus Badelt Score Composer
Stuart Beattie Original Story
Christopher Boyes Sound/Sound Designer
Jerry Bruckheimer Producer
Craig Wood Editor
Paul Deason Executive Producer
Larry Dias Set Decoration/Design
Kate Dowd Casting
Ted Elliott Original Story,Screenwriter
Bruce Hendricks Executive Producer
William Hiney Set Decoration/Design
Mark Hitchler Set Decoration/Design
R.J. Hohman Special Effects
Gregory Scott Hooper Set Decoration/Design
Peter Kohn Asst. Director
Ronna Kress Casting
Brian Morris Production Designer
Ve Neill Makeup
Chad Oman Executive Producer
Lee Orloff Sound/Sound Designer
Stephen E. Rivkin Editor
Keith Rogers Sound Mixer
Penny Rose Costumes/Costume Designer
Terry Rossio Original Story,Screenwriter
Pat Sandston Associate Producer
Domenic Silvestri Set Decoration/Design
Mike Stenson Executive Producer
James Tocci Art Director
Keith Vanderlaan Makeup Special Effects
Darrell L. Wight Set Decoration/Design
Jay Wolpert Original Story
Dariusz Wolski Cinematographer
Don Woodruff Art Director

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Scene Index

Side #1 -- Pirates of the Caribbean [WS]
1. Opening Credits/A Pirate's Life
2. Pirates Ye Be Warned
3. Elizabeth's Rescue
4. The Black Pearl
5. Welcome Aboard
6. The Hunt
7. Finding a Crew
8. Aztec Gold
9. The Treasure of Cortez
10. Keep to the Code
11. The Battle
12. Stranded Again
13. The Curse
14. The Trojan Horse
15. The Curse is Lifted
16. End Credits
Side #2 -- Special Features
1. Play All
1. Intro [:39]
2. The Actors [3:13]
3. Locations [4:42]
4. Production Design [4:48]
5. The Ships [4:18]
6. Costumes and Make-Up [5:06]
7. Stunts and Swords [6:29]
8. Visual Effects [6:18]
9. The Premiere [2:19]
1. Captain's Quarters: Code of Conduct [:38]
2. Captain's Quarters: Rank and Privilage [1:31]
3. Captain's Quarters: How Piracy Began [:15]
4. Captain's Quarters: Black Bart Roberts [1:39]
5. Captain's Quarters: Blackbeard [:15]
6. Captain's Quarters: John Paul Jones [1:29]
7. Captain's Quarters: Capt. Kidd [:12]
8. Captain's Quarters: Robinson Crusoe [1:52]
9. Captain's Quarters: Sir Francis Drake [:22]
10. Captain's Quarters: Women Pirates [2:58]
11. Captain's Quarters: Chinese Pirates [:13]
12. Captain's Quarters: Edward Lowe [1:00]
13. Captain's Quarters: What They Stole [:15]
14. Captain's Quarters: Buried Treasure [1:54]
15. Captain's Quarters: X Marks the Spot [:15]
16. On Deck: Punishments [1:14]
17. On Deck: Symbols [:16]
18. On Deck: Nature's Wrath [:42]
19. On Deck: Pirate Ships [:15]
20. The Gunnery: Weapons [1:24]
21. The Gunnery: Battles [:15]
22. The Gallery: Daily Life [2:31]
23. The Gallery: Superstitions [:33]
24. The Gallery: Types of Pirates [:00]
1. Meet Will Turner (Full Version [:43]
2. Carriage Ride (Gov. Swann and Elizabeth) [:35]
3. A Change in the Wind (Extended Weather Montage) [:59]
4. Only One Shot (Will Helps Jack Escape From Jail) [:36]
5. Peep Show (Pintel and Ragetti's Eye) [1:53]
6. All is Well (More From the Ride, Jack and Will in Tortuga) [:24]
7. Make It Last (More From the Ride, Tortuga Tavern) [:33]
8. A Bit of a Stick (Will is Wound Too Tight, Tortuga Tavern) [:33]
9. It's Begun ( Jack and Will at the Point) [1:09]
10. The French (Improvisation With Jack and the Pirates) [:44]
11. Not All That Big (A Walk Around the Island) [1:43]
12. No Truth at All (Elizabeth Teaches Jack the Song) [2:08]
13. Accepting the Proposal (Elizabeth and the Commodore: a Conditional Request) [2:07]
14. Peas in a Pod (Elizabeth and Jack in the Graveyard of Ships) [1:04]
15. Take a Walk (Pirates Submerge) [:50]
16. Let Them East Cake (Mallot and Grapple Extended Scene) [:30]
17. The Immortal Captain Jack (Jack Removes His Own Curse: This Scene was Deleted Before any Skeletal Effects had Begun) [1:02]
18. Good Luck (More With Murtogg and Mullroy) [:39]
19. Happy Endings (Commodore Norrington Addresses Elizabeth) [:53]

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