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Platinum Blonde
     

Platinum Blonde

3.0 2
Director: Frank Capra, Loretta Young, Robert Williams, Jean Harlow

Cast: Frank Capra, Loretta Young, Robert Williams, Jean Harlow

 

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This sly and smart comedy starring Jean Harlow gets a simple presentation for its release on DVD. Platinum Blonde has been transferred to disc in its original full-frame aspect ratio of 1.33:1, and the English-language soundtrack has been mastered in Dolby Digital Mono. The disc also includes subtitles in English, French, and Japanese. No bonus materials have

Overview

This sly and smart comedy starring Jean Harlow gets a simple presentation for its release on DVD. Platinum Blonde has been transferred to disc in its original full-frame aspect ratio of 1.33:1, and the English-language soundtrack has been mastered in Dolby Digital Mono. The disc also includes subtitles in English, French, and Japanese. No bonus materials have been added for this edition.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
This early Frank Capra talkie showcases Robert Williams in an edgy performance as Stew Smith, a streetwise reporter who naively jumps into marriage with the beautiful socialite Anne Schuyler. Inevitably, he loses his identity and is cut off from all that was familiar to him. While the plot may seem like a cliché to modern audiences, the evolution of Stew and Anne's relationship is handled with a refreshing maturity. Their attraction is immediate, and Williams and Jean Harlow have a chemistry that comes through as honest, notably in a sexually charged scene where they make out behind a fountain glass, and in a bedroom scene where they playfully argue with each other while speaking their dialogue to the tune of "A-Hunting We Will Go." At first, Stew fights to retain his connection to his former world -- he refuses to wear garters, use his valet, give up his job, or live in Anne's house -- but one by one surrenders each of these principles, almost without realizing it. Capra repeatedly stresses the theme of the bird in a gilded cage to emphasize Stew's confinement (and emasculation). Capra also underscores Stew's boredom through subtle touches such as showing him playing hopscotch on the tile floor. Stew's scenes with the butler Smythe are especially fun, as when he instructs Smythe in how to yell so that his voice echoes through the vast but empty mansion, and Smythe in turn educates Stew on the fine art of puttering. Platinum Blonde can certainly be accused of being rather predictable and simplistic, but it also possesses a charm and naturalness that is often missing from Capra's later films.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/04/2003
UPC:
0043396037595
Original Release:
1931
Rating:
NR
Source:
Sony Pictures
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[B&W]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital]
Time:
1:29:00

Special Features

Closed Caption; [None specified]

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Loretta Young Gallagher
Robert Williams Stew Smith
Jean Harlow Anne Schuyler
Louise Closser Hale Mrs. Schuyler
Donald Dilloway Michael Schuyler
Reginald Owen Dexter Grayson
Walter Catlett Bingy Baker
Edmund Breese Conroy, The Editor
Claud Allister Dawson, The Valet
Rychard Cramer Speakeasy Proprietor
Dick Pritchard Actor
Halliwell Hobbes Smythe, The Butler
Wilson Benge Butler
Tom London Reporter
Olaf Hytten Radcliffe
Charles Jordan Reporter
Hal Price Reporter
Harry Semels Waiter
Eddy Chandler Reporter
William "Wild Bill" Elliott Dinner Guest

Technical Credits
Frank Capra Director
Edward Bernds Sound Mixer
Harry Chandlee Original Story
Douglas W. Churchill Original Story
Harry Cohn Producer
C.C. Coleman Asst. Director
Stephen Goosson Art Director
Dorothy Howell Screenwriter
Gene Milford Editor
Robert Riskin Screenwriter
Jo Swerling Screenwriter
Joseph Walker Cinematographer

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Start
2. "Stew" Smith, Reporter
3. The Schuyler Family
4. The Man From the Tribune
5. The Man From the Post
6. Gallagher, Sob Sister
7. The Bobo/Babykins Letters
8. Putty in Her hands
9. An Interesting Experiment
10. Stuck on Some Society Gal
11. Scooped on His Own Beat
12. A Rich Wife's Magnolia
13. The Usual Blessings
14. Estate Planning
15. Dawson the Valet
16. Garters
17. The Spanish Ambassador's Reception
18. Mrs. Smith Meets Gallagher
19. The Tribune's Job Offer
20. The Most Terrible Kind of Publicity
21. Mr. Smith Sends His Regrets
22. A Natural Putterer
23. The More the Merrier
24. "Write About Something You Know."
25. Home Drunk & Early
26. Declaration of Independence
27. The Twentieth Crack
28. A Swell Idea

Customer Reviews

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Platinum Blonde 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Robert Williams makes this film worth a look. He's virtually unknown today because he died so young -- just days after this movie premiered in 1931. But if this is any indication, he could have ended up as one of the top leading men of that era. He kind of reminded me of Gable in a few ways. Harlow is always a plus, but this isn't the best Harlow vehicle I've seen. She's better in things like CHINA SEAS, RED HEADED WOMAN, LIBELED LADY, and WIFE vs SECRETARY. I liked Loretta Young more than Harlow in this film.
anselmus More than 1 year ago
Harlow, Loretta Young and some of the rest of the cast do a fair job in this dated comedy. Robert Williams, as the lead, is quite annoying and scarcely funny at all. I found this at best a curiosity. The setup and plot are mildly interesting. To really see some good work by Jean Harlow check out Libeled Lady or Dinner At Eight.