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Popeye the Sailor, 1933-1938 - Volume One
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Popeye the Sailor, 1933-1938 - Volume One

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Director: Dave Fleischer, Earl Hurd, Max Fleischer, Pat Sullivan

Cast: Dave Fleischer, Earl Hurd, Max Fleischer, Pat Sullivan

 
Popeye the Sailor was introduced to American audiences in 1933 and became one of the most endearing and successful characters in animation history, mainly because of his unique vernacular and hilarious catchphrases. His adventures were strange, humorous, and often supernatural as he traveled all over the world to confront enemies. Much like the other animation

Overview

Popeye the Sailor was introduced to American audiences in 1933 and became one of the most endearing and successful characters in animation history, mainly because of his unique vernacular and hilarious catchphrases. His adventures were strange, humorous, and often supernatural as he traveled all over the world to confront enemies. Much like the other animation icons of the 1930s, the Popeye plots invoked traditional values, possessed uncompromising moral standards, and advocated force only as a last resort. A softie for his lady love, Olive Oyl, Popeye usually embarked on conflicts with villains like Bluto and Sea Hag when they made a move on his "sweet patootie." Popeye was usually clobbered at first, until he ate his spinach: Once dosed with his roughage of choice, he put his enormous forearms to work, with his corncob pipe twirling in the side of his mouth, and pummeled his opponent silly. Popeye the Sailor, 1933-1938 -- Volume One includes more than 9 hours of cartoons: 58 black-and-white theatrical shorts (7-10 minutes each) and a pair of 2-reel (20-minute) color cartoons. Some of the most memorable shorts from the DVD are the remastered "Blow Me Down!" and a cameo appearance by Betty Boop dressed as a hula dancer in the 1933 "Popeye the Sailor" cartoon, the short in which Popeye made his first animated appearance. The four-disc DVD set also includes the Academy Award-nominated "Popeye the Sailor Meets Sinbad the Sailor" and more than 5 hours of incredible bonus features.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/31/2007
UPC:
0012569797963
Rating:
NR
Source:
Warner Home Video
Region Code:
1
Time:
6:56:00
Sales rank:
21,574

Special Features

Commentaries and Popeye Popumentary featurettes with animators, historians and voice artists profiling specific cartoons, characters and creators; 2 retrospective documentaries: ; I Yam What I Yam: The Story of Popeye the Sailor; Forging the Frame: The Roots of Animation 1900-1920; From the vault: Bonus early Fleischer cartoons, including memorable Out of the Inkwell shorts

Cast & Crew

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Popeye the Sailor, 1933-1938 - Volume One 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Robert-Long More than 1 year ago
These are the earliest Popeye theatrical cartoons. They're very interesting to watch. The very first one actually isn't properly a Popeye cartoon; it's a Betty Boop cartoon that introduces Popeye to the big screen. You can see that it's pre-Code; Betty would otherwise never have been allowed to be topless (except for a lei--she's doing a hula dance, and Popeye joins her on stage). Each disk carries a "warning" about racial/gender/etc. stereotypes; ignore it and enjoy the cartoons for the old-style productions that they are. Make sure to check out the special features. Each disk has some even older, silent cartoons from the first days of animation (including a Krazy Kat and lots of early Fleischer "Out of the Inkwell"). There are also interviews and documentaries about early animation, old comic strips and the Fleischers. Also recommended: Popeye the Sailor Vol. Two and Three, Fleischer's Superman (from the '40s) and Betty Boop.
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