Porcile

Overview

Julian (Jean-Pierre Leaud) is the son of German industrialist Klotz (Alberto Lionello) who seeks to go into business with the former Nazi Herdhitze (Ugo Tognazzi). Herdhitze had spent most of World War II collecting human skulls for experiments with brain matter. As a protest, Julian refuses to marry his fiancé from a pre-arranged marriage, and he becomes romantically involved with pigs. Part two finds a man driven to cannibalism by hunger while wandering Mount Etna. He scavenges the mountainside looking for any ...
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DVD (Letterbox)
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Overview

Julian (Jean-Pierre Leaud) is the son of German industrialist Klotz (Alberto Lionello) who seeks to go into business with the former Nazi Herdhitze (Ugo Tognazzi). Herdhitze had spent most of World War II collecting human skulls for experiments with brain matter. As a protest, Julian refuses to marry his fiancé from a pre-arranged marriage, and he becomes romantically involved with pigs. Part two finds a man driven to cannibalism by hunger while wandering Mount Etna. He scavenges the mountainside looking for any kind of sustenance. In both cases, humans revert to animal behavior when they are removed from the spectrum of social rules and opinions.
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Special Features

Widescreen format; Never seen before documentary "Pier Paolo Pasolini"
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 3/14/2003
  • UPC: 759259140332
  • Original Release: 1969
  • Rating:

  • Source: Water Bearer Films
  • Aspect Ratio: Theatre Wide-Screen (1.85.1)
  • Presentation: Letterbox
  • Language: Italiano
  • Time: 1:39:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 50,891

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Pierre Clémenti Cannibal
Jean-Pierre Léaud Julian
Alberto Lionello Klotz
Ugo Tognazzi Herdhitze
Anne Wiazemsky Ida
Margarita Lozano Mrs. Klotz
Marco Ferreri Hans
Franco Citti 2nd Cannibal
Ninetto Davoli Maracchione
Technical Credits
Pier Paolo Pasolini Director, Screenwriter
Nino Baragli Editor
Tonino Delli Colli Cinematographer
Danilo Donati Costumes/Costume Designer
Armando Nannuzzi Cinematographer
Giuseppe Ruzzolini Cinematographer
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Menu

Side #1 --
   Start Program
   "Pier Paolo Pasolini" - A Film Maker's Life
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2001

    The Artist having fun

    Sometimes hard to watch, but nonetheless, clever little film by Pasolini, Italy¿s most controversial director. Notable for the remarkably shocking Salo (Pasolini¿s last film, he was murdered after its completion), Porcile is a step below the former in its use of depraved characters and unthinkable subject matters. However, Pasolini has his way with perversions (that is in his films) and Pigsty utilizes a sufficient amount of ribald qualities for which Pasolini¿s films are known. The film depicts two distinct episodes: 1, a renegade soldier stranded in the wastelands who is eventually executed for his turpitude of cannibalism. 2. A prestigious fascist whose son becomes involved in zoophilia. Finally these two events coalesce and climaxes in an utterly bizarre social statement. Porcile presents the filmmaker¿s own beliefs on Fascism, the bourgeoisie, and demoralization. These ideas (plus abstract metaphors) were succeedingly used in the aforementioned Salo;120 Days Of Sodom. Porcile (or Pigsty) stars the great (and omnipresent) Ugo Tognazzi, as well as Marco Ferreri, who would later direct a slew of black comedy-drama pictures in the same vein as the film in question. These two actors definitely energize the film, portraying two awkward Fascists who seemingly tickle the film¿s prevailingly dark subject matter. All in all, Porcile is an acquired taste (hence, a cult film) but don¿t let the absurdities baffle you: it¿s just the artist having fun.

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