Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice

4.7 315
Director: Simon Langton

Cast: Colin Firth, Jennifer Ehle, Susannah Harker

     
 

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Jane Austen's classic novel is brought to the screen once again in this intelligent and witty romantic drama. Elizabeth Bennett (Jennifer Ehle) is one of five sisters living on a British country estate in the 1800s. At a time and place in which matrimony is considered a woman's logical goal in life, Elizabeth displays a cautious reluctance toward marriage -- so when a… See more details below

Overview

Jane Austen's classic novel is brought to the screen once again in this intelligent and witty romantic drama. Elizabeth Bennett (Jennifer Ehle) is one of five sisters living on a British country estate in the 1800s. At a time and place in which matrimony is considered a woman's logical goal in life, Elizabeth displays a cautious reluctance toward marriage -- so when a wealthy young man, Fitzwilliam Darcy (Colin Firth) expresses an interest in courting her, she isn't so sure she cares for him. Elizabeth and Darcy discover that they have a great deal to learn about each other -- and no small amount to overcome in their minds -- if they are to find happiness together. Pride and Prejudice was produced as a five hour mini-series by the BBC and was first shown in the U.S. on the A&E cable network.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Amy Robinson
Transforming Jane Austen's intricate, subtly satiric novels into suitable screen fare is not an easy accomplishment, but this five-hour BBC version of her most-loved work makes the transition from page to screen brilliantly. The courtship rituals between the daughters of a country gentleman and their widely varied suitors are hampered by excesses of both pride and prejudice; most particularly, the courtship of the snobbish but eminently wealthy Darcy (Colin Firth) and the delightfully independent Elizabeth (Jennifer Ehle). Ehle perfectly captures Elizabeth's lively sense of humor and keen intelligence, while Firth persuasively portrays a man whose surface reserve masks violent emotions. While the essential plot has elements of soap-opera cliché, Pride and Prejudice is anything but. Its clear-eyed observations of human frailty and folly and its straightforward romanticism make this impressively mounted miniseries a touching, comedic and naturalistic melodrama, satisfying to both longtime fans and Austen novices.
All Movie Guide - Mike Cummings
Thanks to this made-for-TV film and three other film adaptations of Jane Austen's novels -- Persuasion, Sense and Sensibility, and Clueless (based on Emma) -- the work of Jane Austen enjoyed a renaissance in bookstores and college classrooms in 1995. Pride and Prejudice has several things going for it. First, the actors perform brilliantly, bringing Georgian England to life with their class-conscious behavior and attitudes and their drawing-room repartee. Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth are particularly good as the central characters, Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy. Second, writer Andrew Davies' script wisely includes verbatim dialogue from the Austen novel that is rich in wit, irony, and humor. Third, producer Sue Birtwistle pays close attention to period costumes, customs, and surroundings. Even the dances mimic authentic gambols and frolics popular in Austen's times. Fourth, the length of the film enables director Simon Langton to present a complete -- or nearly complete -- exposition of the plot. Consequently, viewers are treated to many entertaining scenes, involving minor as well as major characters, that probably would have been omitted in a shorter film version of the novel. Although the highly praised 1940 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, starring Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson, had much to commend it, its length forced it to truncate the plot and present an abridged ghost of the real story. Fans of Olivier and Garson may balk at assertions that Langton's 1995 adaptation has become the definitive film version of the novel, but the popularity of the Langton version and the reviews of many critics suggest that it has.

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Product Details

Release Date:
04/14/2009
UPC:
0733961117714
Original Release:
1995
Rating:
NR
Source:
A&E Home Video
Time:
5:23:00

Special Features

Exclusive Blu-ray bonus content includes the featurettes: "Lasting Impressions," "An Impromptu Walkabout with Adrian Lukis and Lucy Briers," "Turning Point," and "Uncovering the Technical Restoration Process."

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