Pride of the Bowery

Overview

One of a handful of East Side Kids movies that have fallen out of copyright, Pride Of The Bowery has gotten a just-about-decent if somewhat uneven transfer (especially in the sound department). The details in the faces tend to disappear in the close-ups, and there's little except white with a few lines in one scene in a doctor's clinic, both signs that too much light was pumped through the print; and there are frames missing in various spots, and dark vertical lines through much of the source print -- ...
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DVD (Black & White)
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Overview

One of a handful of East Side Kids movies that have fallen out of copyright, Pride Of The Bowery has gotten a just-about-decent if somewhat uneven transfer (especially in the sound department). The details in the faces tend to disappear in the close-ups, and there's little except white with a few lines in one scene in a doctor's clinic, both signs that too much light was pumped through the print; and there are frames missing in various spots, and dark vertical lines through much of the source print -- astonishingly, about 38 minutes into the disc, the close-ups get crisp and detailed, and make one long for the rest of the movie to look at good as those shots. There are only four chapters, which is rather pathetic considering how chock full of plot the 61-minute feature is. Still, the disc is watchable and for under $9 list, this is a decent bargain, at least until a better source comes along. There are a few digital artifacts to be seen and a major sound drop-out at 59 minutes in, but otherwise Alpha's Pride Of The Bowery is passable for the price.
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Special Features

[None specified]
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Bruce Eder
Pride Of The Bowery was one only the third East Side Kids movie -- Huntz Hall was not yet aboard, but Leo Gorcey, Bobby Jordan, David Gorcey (all of whom had appeared in the original play Dead End) and Donald Haines (an alumnus of Hal Roach and an ex-Our Gang member) were aboard, and Sammy "Sunshine" Morrison was present as Scruno, but that character wasn't in exactly the same role that he usually played in the East Side Kids films; even Bobby Stone, who would figure in the later films, was here. Director Joseph H. Lewis, who would do excellent work in film noir, thrillers, and westerns in feature films and television for another 20 years, moves the story forward at a breakneck pace without sacrificing any coherency or logic, and even leaving room for some good dramatic scenes -- within the context of a low-budget Monogram production that probably took less than 10 days to shoot, there are two especially good moments: When Gorcey's Muggs Maloney tries to shrug off the jam he is in, saying he's been in trouble before, and Bobby Jordan's Danny tells him, "Yeah, but not for stealing," the look on Gorcey's face is one of the best serious screen moments of his career; and the scene in which Muggs rescues Al (Ken Howell) from a falling tree is shot about as well as any action scene you'll ever see. Pride Of The Bowery is also a fascinating pop-culture document of its era, with a plot set in the Civilian Conservation Corps (or CCC), a Depression Era answer to the unemployment of the nation's youth -- recognizing that there were vital land reclamation and rural restoration projects that needed doing and hundreds of thousands of idled older teenagers and young men, the Roosevelt administration set up the CCC in 1933; over the next nine years, once their need was established, members signed up for six month hitches at $30 a month ($25 paid to their families) plus shelter and meals, doing land clearing and other essential projects. Thanks to the lingering popularity of the East Side Kids movies across the decade, Pride Of The Bowery is probably the last Hollywood artifact about the New Deal and the CCC that one can still see. [Note: The presence of Sammy "Sunshine" Morrison's character of Scruno as one -- and so far as we can tell, the only -- black member of the camp raises an interesting historical matter; the CCC had originally been integrated, but by the mid-1930's the organization was as segregated as any institution in the south, mostly because of local resistance, especially in the south, to integrated CCC camps, and the Roosevelt administration was forced to quietly restrict black enrollment in the program].
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/15/2002
  • UPC: 089218304698
  • Original Release: 1941
  • Rating:

  • Source: Alpha Video
  • Region Code: 0
  • Aspect Ratio: Pre-1954 Standard (1.33.1)
  • Presentation: Black & White
  • Time: 1:01:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 97,704

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Leo Gorcey Muggs Maloney
Bobby Jordan Danny
Donald Haines Skinny
Carleton Young Norton
Ken Howell Al
David Gorcey Peewee
Eugene Francis Algy
Mary Ainslee Elaine
Kenneth Harlan Captain Jim White
East Side Kids
Lloyd Ingraham Doctor
Sammy "Sunshine" Morrison Scruno
Bobby Stone Willie
Nick Stuart Ranger
Technical Credits
Joseph H. Lewis Director
Robert C. Cline Cinematographer
Robert Golden Editor
Sam Katzman Producer
Johnny Lange Musical Direction/Supervision
William Lively Screenwriter
George Plympton Screenwriter
Lew Porter Musical Direction/Supervision
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Scene Index

Side #1 --
0. Index
2. Chapter 1 [13:02]
3. Chapter 2 [11:02]
4. Chapter 3 [11:50]
5. Chapter 4 [11:51]
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Menu

Side #1 --
   Play
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