Repulsion

Repulsion

4.8 9
Director: Roman Polanski

Cast: Catherine Deneuve, Ian Hendry, John Fraser

     
 

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The first English-language film of director Roman Polanski is a psychological thriller in the vein of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960) and his own later film Rosemary's Baby (1968). Catherine Deneuve stars as Carol Ledoux, a Belgian manicurist living with her sister, Helen (Yvonne Furneaux), in a London flat. Simultaneously attracted and repulsed by sex,See more details below

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Overview

The first English-language film of director Roman Polanski is a psychological thriller in the vein of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960) and his own later film Rosemary's Baby (1968). Catherine Deneuve stars as Carol Ledoux, a Belgian manicurist living with her sister, Helen (Yvonne Furneaux), in a London flat. Simultaneously attracted and repulsed by sex, Carol is a virgin who finds her sister's relationship with a married man, Michael (Ian Hendry), extremely disturbing. When her sister and Michael go on holiday, Carol begins to disintegrate mentally, hallucinating bizarre encounters, being forced into taking a sabbatical from her job and ultimately committing a pair of murders in her deranged state.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Gregory Baird
Director Roman Polanski's first English-language film, Repulsion (1965) is a meticulous and vertiginous descent into madness, with Catherine Deneuve as a young Belgian at war with her inner demons. Deneuve plays Carol, whose aversion to men and tenuous grip on reality come into play when her sister/roommate (Yvonne Furneaux) goes on holiday, leaving Carol alone in their London flat. Don't expect a thrill every minute here. Polanski's masterfully paced film moves ever so slowly into dementia, carefully weaving a portrait of Deneuve's deranged psyche through exquisitely detailed visuals and sounds. Deneuve portrays Carol as a woman in a perpetual daydream, and the apartment literally undergoes a slow metamorphosis as her psychosis deepens. The other performances are equally detailed, full of subtle observations about the interplay between the sexes, with all the men coming off as either creepy, dangerous, or both. Polanski's confidence and virtuosity are apparent in every frame of this superb psychological thriller, and fans of his better-known works (Rosemary's Baby, Chinatown) will find it a riveting cinematic experience.
All Movie Guide - Mark Deming
Roman Polanski's terror classic shows us, in simple but effective terms, the horrors that lurk inside a troubled psyche. While obviously working on a shoestring budget, Polanski recreates with disturbing impact the strange and unsettling horror of a mind that has begun to turn upon itself. Carol Ledoux (played brilliantly by Catherine Deneuve) is not on a strong emotional footing as the story begins: she's at once compelled by and terrified of her sexual needs, and she displays an unhappy emotional distance from others that suggests a mild form of autism. When Carol is left alone after her sister leaves on vacation, her fragile connection with the rest of the world gives way, and. as she isolates herself in her apartment, Carol's mind fragments into a hallucinatory state, which Polanski manifests on-screen with an apt surrealism. Within the increasingly grim and shadowy confines of the flat, revolting images of rotting food and buzzing flies mingle with things that shouldn't or couldn't actually be there, and Polanski's impressionistic use of odd angles, visual distortion, and blunt, shocking violence make Carol's world seem as frighteningly alien to us as it must be to her. Polanski is aided immeasurably by Deneuve's performance; she's the only person onscreen for a large percentage of the movie, and the understated realism of her madness makes the film all the more convincing, demonstrating that the human mind can conjure images far more terrifying than can a special effects crew with a huge budget.

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Product Details

Release Date:
07/28/2009
UPC:
0715515047913
Original Release:
1965
Rating:
NR
Source:
Criterion
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[B&W, Wide Screen]
Time:
1:45:00
Sales rank:
26,750

Special Features

Audio Commentary featuring Polanski and Actress Catherine Deveuve; ; A British Horror Film (2003), a Documentary on the making of Repulsion, featuring Interviews with Polanski, Producer Gene Gutowski, and Cinematographer Gilbert Taylor; ; A 1964 French television documentary filmed on the set of Repulsion, with rare footage of Polanski and Deneuve at work; ; Original Theatrical Trailers; ; Plus: A Booklet featuring an essay by film scholar and curator Bill Horrigan

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Catherine Deneuve Carol Ledoux
Ian Hendry Michael
John Fraser Colin
Patrick Wymark Landlord
Yvonne Furneaux Helen Ledoux
Renee Houston Miss Balch
Helen Fraser Bridget
Valerie Taylor Mme. Denise
James Villiers John
Hugh Futcher Reggie
Monica Merlin Mrs. Rendlesham
Imogen Graham Manicurist
Mike Pratt Workman
Roman Polanski Spoons Player

Technical Credits
Roman Polanski Director,Screenwriter
Gérard Brach Screenwriter
Seamus Flannery Art Director
Gene Gutowski Producer
Chico Hamilton Score Composer,Musical Direction/Supervision
Alastair McIntyre Editor
Tom Smith Makeup
David Stone Screenwriter
Gilbert Taylor Cinematographer
Sam Waynberg Associate Producer

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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Repulsion
1. Opening Titles [2:17]
2. Fire and Ice [6:18]
3. Helen and Michael [10:57]
4. Next Morning [7:26]
5. Cracks [9:03]
6. Left Alone [6:23]
7. Fear and Aversion [12:02]
8. Trouble at Work [9:14]
9. Visit from Colin [8:44]
10. Hands [5:02]
11. The Landlord [12:18]
12. Busywork [5:23]
13. Return [9:12]
14. End Credits [:44]
1. Color Bars [:00]
1. Maurice Binder [2:17]
2. Daydreaming [6:18]
3. Simple Things [10:57]
4. Despot [7:26]
5. South Kensington [9:03]
6. Inside Herself [6:23]
7. A Horrific Element [12:02]
8. Sound and Atmosphere [9:14]
9. The Score [8:44]
10. Violence [5:02]
11. Critical Moments [12:18]
12. Mental Limping [5:23]
13. Surrealists [9:12]
14. The Eye [:44]

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