Roadie

Overview

Roadie is a showbiz saga about the working slobs who make live pop-music performances happen. Texas good ol' boy Travis W. Redfish pop singer Meat Loaf drives a Shiner beer truck on his appointed rounds, but he becomes smitten with rock groupie Lola Bouillabase Kaki Hunter, a "roadie" whose sole ambition in life is to bed her idol, Alice Cooper playing himself. Travis' grizzled pappy, Corpus C. Redfish Art Carney, feels disgusted by his son's lifestyle. After hearing that Cooper and his band are on tour, Lola ...
See more details below
Blu-ray (Wide Screen)
$18.95
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$19.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Blu-ray)
  • All (8) from $14.46   
  • New (6) from $14.46   
  • Used (2) from $29.26   

Overview

Roadie is a showbiz saga about the working slobs who make live pop-music performances happen. Texas good ol' boy Travis W. Redfish pop singer Meat Loaf drives a Shiner beer truck on his appointed rounds, but he becomes smitten with rock groupie Lola Bouillabase Kaki Hunter, a "roadie" whose sole ambition in life is to bed her idol, Alice Cooper playing himself. Travis' grizzled pappy, Corpus C. Redfish Art Carney, feels disgusted by his son's lifestyle. After hearing that Cooper and his band are on tour, Lola sets out to catch up to them and offer her services, with Travis in pursuit. Along the way, they meet a number of pop-music stars -- Blondie, Asleep at the Wheel, Hank Williams Jr., Roy Orbison, and Ramblin' Jack Elliott -- who are all working on their own tours. Travis signs on, himself, as a groupie for a rock band, and is quickly dubbed "greatest roadie of all time," but he soon realizes that he must return to Texas for the wedding of his sister and his best friend.
Read More Show Less

Special Features

Audio commentary from the "real" Travis Redfish, James Big Boy Medlin, and his writing partner, Michael Ventura
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Tom Wiener
It won't win any awards for subtlety, but Roadie is a hoot of a comedy that is also a good an excuse for its producers to pack a soundtrack album with as diverse a group of pop music artists as ever assembled for a feature film. One of the film's jokes is that its star, pop singer Meat Loaf, doesn't warble a note; his character, Travis W. Redfish, has show-biz ambitions, but they extend only to the backstage area. Travis comes off as something of a redneck idiot savant, a beer delivery truck driver who is a dynamo when it comes to making sure that the microphone wires don't get mixed up with the ones for the amplifiers. Roadie is a rock & roll Pilgrim's Progress, as Travis must make his way down that highway to heaven (aka the Alice Cooper tour), a road traveled by music stars who are paying their own dues. Travis's journey allows him to encounter everyone in the pop world from Debbie Harry to Roy Orbison, providing the film with more musical interludes and the soundtrack album more tunes. Unfortunately, Roadie's two-disc soundtrack is not available on compact disc, but the movie lives on wherever video stores with discriminating selections can be found.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/20/2013
  • UPC: 826663142211
  • Original Release: 1980
  • Rating:

  • Source: Shout Factory
  • Region Code: A
  • Presentation: Wide Screen
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:46:00
  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Sales rank: 46,926

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Meat Loaf Travis W. Redfish
Kaki Hunter Lola Bouilliabase
Art Carney Corpus C. Redfish
Gailard Sartain B.B. Muldoon
Don Cornelius Mohammed Johnson
Rhonda Bates Alice Poo
Joe Spano Ace
Richard Marion George
Sonny Davis Bird
Alice Cooper Himself
Deborah Harry Herself
Chris Stein Himself
Clem Burke Himself
Jimmy Destri Himself
Nigel Harrison Himself
Frank Infante Himself
Roy Orbison Himself
Hank Williams Jr. Himself
Merle Kilgore Himself
Ramblin' Jack Elliott Himself
Ray Benson Himself
Sheryl Cooper Herself
Alvin Crow Himself
Blondie
Hamilton Camp
Alan Lee Graf
Larry Lindsey
Larry Marshall
Technical Credits
Alan Rudolph Director, Original Story, Screenwriter
Gail Bixby Costumes/Costume Designer
Richard S. Friedman Set Decoration/Design
Richard Bryce Goodman Sound/Sound Designer
Jered Edd Grenn Costumes/Costume Designer
Craig Hundley Score Composer
Alan King Producer
Zalman King Executive Producer, Original Story, Producer, Screenwriter
Carol Littleton Editor
James Big Boy Medlin Original Story, Screenwriter
David Myers Cinematographer
Paul Peters Production Designer
Carolyn Pfeiffer Producer
Bruce Robinson Screenwriter
Michael Ventura Original Story, Screenwriter
Tom Walls Editor
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    What Cult Movies Should Be

    As a person with a nervous disposition who has enough trouble setting through many movies once, the ultimate tribute I can give this great ¿on the road¿ rock¿n¿roll saga is that I watched it numerous times when it was on cable in 1981, I have watched it several dozens of times on VHS, and now that it¿s on DVD, I have watched it several times again. You can put a lot of mileage on this road movie. The film has a rock¿n¿roll backdrop¿a backdrop we rarely see from the workingman¿s eye the way we do here. The movie gives us what amounts to real-world views of several 70¿s favorites (Meatloaf, Alice Cooper, Blondie, etc.). It has a great premise, the howling self-reliant ¿Everything Works If You Let It¿ theme. It also enjoys a background soundtrack that fires on all twelve cylinders. But what keeps me watching the film is that it is really funny in an honest, straight-forward way that we have enjoyed far too seldom since Hollywood started grinding out its cookie-cutter farces in the wake of ¿Airplane.¿ The dual surprises of the film are the really solid performances put in by Alice Cooper and Meatloaf in their respective roles as rock star and roadie. I am unqualified in my admiration of this movie, but I will tightly qualify the people to whom I would suggest the film. This is a ¿cult¿ movie in the most real sense of the word and anyone who is made nervous by rock music, farce that is outside of the ¿Scary Movie¿ mainstream, or three-hundred pound leading men (Meatloaf) should avoid this movie at all costs. Also, there is a certain good ol¿ boy mentality at work here that will not play for some parts of the audience. But to the core audience of the film, these are not qualifications, they are recommendations. The thing I am saddest about is that the movie¿s soundtrack is no longer available. The soundtrack was worth having simply for the long and messy ¿Brainlock¿ which plays during one of the few really funny car chases in the history of film.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews