Rome - Season 2

( 18 )

Overview

Season 2 of the lavish, lusty British historical series Rome begins exactly where Season One left off, with the murder of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March in the year 44 BCE. The power struggle that follows is set in motion when, thanks largely to the machinations of Caesar's scheming niece Atia Polly Walker, her young and callow son Octavian Max Pirkis is announced as heir to the throne--infuriating Caesar's closest ally Marc Antony James Purefoy. In the war that follows between Antony's "Caesarians" and ...
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Overview

Season 2 of the lavish, lusty British historical series Rome begins exactly where Season One left off, with the murder of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March in the year 44 BCE. The power struggle that follows is set in motion when, thanks largely to the machinations of Caesar's scheming niece Atia Polly Walker, her young and callow son Octavian Max Pirkis is announced as heir to the throne--infuriating Caesar's closest ally Marc Antony James Purefoy. In the war that follows between Antony's "Caesarians" and Octavian's "Liberators," there can be only one winner--but it is not until the season concludes in the year 31 BCE that the true winner is revealed. Amidst the intrigues of Rome's high-born power brokers, we never lose sight of the secondary plotline involving two lowly veterans of the Gallic wars, Titus Pullo Ray Stevenson and Lucius Vorenus Kevin McKidd. Characteristically, it is the thoroughly hedonistic Pullo who thrives and prospers during this turbulent era, with each stroke of luck advancing his prestigate and wealth. Conversely, Lucius suffers spectacularly throughout season two, beginning with the death of his beloved wife and the distintegration of his family. The ultimate blow will not be dealt to Vorenus until the season finale, but in the meantime much is made of the fact that Gallo has aligned himself with Octavian, and Vorenus casts his lot with Antony. Though scrupulously authentic in its historical detail, Rome continues to successfully pinpoint the most "contemporary" aspects of ancient History. Especially notable this season is the series' depiction of Rome's small but ever-growing Jewish community, and the emergence of "Crip and Blood"-style gang warfare in the treacherous Aventine Collegium district. In a similar vein, after Marc Antony suffers his humiliating defeat at Actium, he retreats to the palace of his Egyptian lover Queen Cleopatra Lyndsley Marshal, where the two lost souls wallow in debauchery--reminding more than one observer of the equally foredoomed punk-rockers Sid Vicious and Nancy Spungen!
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Special Features

All Roads Lead to Rome Interactive Guide Prepared by the Series' Co-Producer/Historical Consultant, Jonathan Stamp; A Tale of Two Romes - Ancient Rome Was Two Different Cities For Two Different Classes. See How the Patricians and the Plebs Differed in All Matters, From Jobs to Recreation to Religion; The Making of Rome, Season II - Take a Tour of the Production of the Epic Series, From Costumes to Sets to Special Effects - Plus a Detailed Look at the Battle of Philippi; The Rise of Octavian: Rome's First Emperor - The Larger-Than-Life Story of the Cunning Boy Who Became the Most Powerful Man in Rome; Antony & Cleopatra - a Revealing Look at One of the Most Famous Love Affairs of All Time; Five Revealing Audio Commentaries With Cast and Crew.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/7/2007
  • UPC: 026359395628
  • Rating:

  • Source: Hbo Home Video
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Wide Screen / Subtitled / Dubbed
  • Sound: Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound
  • Time: 10:00:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 20,867

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Rome: The Complete Second Season
2. Treachery's Fruit [10:07]
3. Sole Heir [9:50]
4. Immortal Liberators [5:11]
5. A Truce [8:20]
6. Pleasing Them Below [11:46]
7. My Children [9:11]
2. Possibilites [9:49]
3. Advice and Council [7:50]
4. A Show of Unity [9:48]
5. A Parley [7:15]
6. Conjoined Interests [8:59]
7. Pimps, Knifemen, Thieves [6:14]
Disc #2 -- Rome: The Complete Second Season
2. Captain of the Aventine [5:22]
3. A Wolf by the Ears [10:42]
4. Molten Gold [10:38]
5. Pretty Little Duro [7:02]
6. Born Again [8:44]
7. Mighty Cicero [9:41]
2. A Legal Confession [7:46]
3. Bloody Business [7:23]
4. Caesar Octavian [8:43]
5. Degraded & Defiled [8:04]
6. A Messenger [8:45]
7. The Children [7:30]
Disc #3 -- Rome: The Complete Second Season
2. A Vanity Deserved [7:42]
3. Praise Orbona [10:06]
4. Forgiveness [7:31]
5. Honor My Father [9:58]
6. A Letter to Cicero [11:58]
7. On to Rome [8:21]
2. Woe Unto Tranquillus [7:22]
3. A Good Game [8:01]
4. A Few Moments [8:17]
5. Agrippa & Octavia [10:50]
6. Old Days & Today [8:05]
7. Philippi [10:29]
Disc #4 -- Rome: The Complete Second Season
2. Death Mask [7:58]
3. Triumviri [8:17]
4. In Sacrifice [11:13]
5. Friends by Oath [9:38]
6. His Will Be Done [6:20]
7. Love, Power & Despair [10:22]
2. Women of Rome [7:44]
3. No Burning [8:33]
4. Brotherly Love [5:43]
5. A Monster [8:55]
6. Betrayal [13:17]
7. Captives [9:12]
Disc #5 -- Rome: The Complete Second Season
2. The Animal's Thirst [8:05]
3. Voice of the People [8:02]
4. Voyage to Egypt [9:48]
5. A Delicate Mission [12:22]
6. Weep, Fight & Destroy [8:26]
7. Viva Nemesis [9:50]
2. The Sun Still Shines [9:32]
3. Anubis Breathes [10:17]
4. I Died Roman [10:15]
5. The Snake [13:35]
6. Take Me Home [7:57]
7. First Citizen [10:40]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Rome: The Complete Second Season
   Episodes
      Passover
         Season 1 Recap
         Next On
         Play Episode
         Audio Commentary
            Episode 1: "Passover" With Co-Creator/Executive Producer Bruno Heller and Co-Producer/Historical Consultant Joanthan Stamp - Play With Commentary
         All Roads Lead to Rome
            Continue
         Scene Selection
      Son of Hades
         Previously On
         Next On
         Play Episode
         All Roads Lead to Rome
            Continue
         Scene Selection
Disc #2 -- Rome: The Complete Second Season
   Episodes
      These Being the Words of Marcus Tullius Cicero
         Previously On
         Next On
         Play Episode
         All Roads Lead to Rome
            Continue
         Scene Selection
      Testudo et Lepus (The Tortoise and the Hare)
         Previously On
         Next On
         Play Episode
         All Roads Lead to Rome
            Continue
         Scene Selection
   Languages
      Audio: English 5.1 Surround
      Audio: Spanish 2.0
      Subtitles: English
      Subtitles: Spanish
      Subtitles: French
      Subtitles: None
   Features
      All Roads Lead to Rome: "These Being the Words of Marcus Tullius Cicero"
         Continue
      All Roads Lead to Rome: "Testudo et Lepus" (The Tortise and the Hare)
         Continue
Disc #3 -- Rome: The Complete Second Season
   Episodes
      Heroes of the Republic
         Previously On
         Next On
         Play Episode
         All Roads Lead to Rome
            Continue
         Scene Selection
      Philippi
         Previously On
         Next On
         Play Episode
         All Roads Lead to Rome
            Continue
         Scene Selection
   Languages
      Audio: English 5.1 Surround
      Audio: Spanish 2.0
      Subtitles: English
      Subtitles: Spanish
      Subtitles: French
      Subtitles: None
   Features
      The Making of Rome, Season II
      All Roads Lead to Rome: "Heroes of the Republic"
         Continue
      All Roads Lead to Rome: "Philippi"
         Continue
Disc #4 -- Rome: The Complete Second Season
   Episodes
      Death Mask
         Previously On
         Next On
         Play Episode
         Audio Commentary
            Episode 7: "Death Mask" With Director John Maybury and Lindsay Duncan (Servilia) - Play With Commentary
            Episode 8: "A Necessary Fiction" With Executive Producer John Melfi an Director Carl Franklin - Play With Commentary
         All Roads Lead to Rome
            Continue
         Scene Selection
      A Necessary Fiction
         Previously On
         Next On
         Play Episode
         Audio Commentary
            Episode 7: "Death Mask" With Director John Maybury and Lindsay Duncan (Servilia) - Play With Commentary
            Episode 8: "A Necessary Fiction" With Executive Producer John Melfi an Director Carl Franklin - Play With Commentary
         All Roads Lead to Rome
            Continue
         Scene Selection
   Languages
      Audio: English 5.1 Surround
      Audio: Spanish 2.0
      Subtitles: English
      Subtitles: Spanish
      Subtitles: French
      Subtitles: None
   Features
      Audio Commentaries
         Episode 7: "Death Mask" With Director John Maybury and Lindsay Duncan (Servilia) - Play With Commentary
         Episode 8: "A Necessary Fiction" With Executive Producer John Melfi an Director Carl Franklin - Play With Commentary
      The Rise of Octavian: Rome's First Emperor
      All Roads Lead to Rome: "Death Mask"
         Continue
      All Roads Lead to Rome: "A Necessary Fiction"
         Continue
Disc #5 -- Rome: The Complete Second Season
   Episodes
      Deus Impeditio Esuritori Nullus (No God Can Stop a Hungry Man)
         Previously On
         Next On
         Play Episode
         Audio Commentary
            Episode 9: "Deus Impeditio Esuritori Nullus" (No God Can Stop a Hungry Man) With James Purefoy (Mark Antony) - Play With Commentary
            Episode 10: "De Parte Vostro" (About Your Father) With Co-Creator/Executive Producer Bruno Heller and Co-Producer/Historical Consultant Jonathan Stamp - Play With Commentary
         All Roads Lead to Rome
            Continue
         Scene Selection
      De Parte Vostro (About Your Father)
         Previously On
         Play Episode
         Audio Commentary
            Episode 9: "Deus Impeditio Esuritori Nullus" (No God Can Stop a Hungry Man) With James Purefoy (Mark Antony) - Play With Commentary
            Episode 10: "De Parte Vostro" (About Your Father) With Co-Creator/Executive Producer Bruno Heller and Co-Producer/Historical Consultant Jonathan Stamp - Play With Commentary
         All Roads to Rome
            Continue
         Scene Selection
   Languages
      Audio: English 5.1 Surround
      Audio: Spanish 2.0
      Subtitles: English
      Subtitles: Spanish
      Subtitles: French
      Subtitles: None
   Features
      Audio Commentaries
         Episode 9: "Deus Impeditio Esuritori Nullus" (No God Can Stop a Hungry Man) With James Purefoy (Mark Antony) - Play With Commentary
         Episode 10: "De Parte Vostro" (About Your Father) With Co-Creator/Executive Producer Bruno Heller and Co-Producer/Historical Consultant Jonathan Stamp - Play With Commentary
      Antony & Cleopatra
      All Roads Lead to Rome: "Deus Impeditio Esuritori Nullus" (No God Can Stop a Hungry Man)
         Continue
      All Roads Lead to Rome: "De Parte Vostro" (About Your Father)
         Continue
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 18 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Again Wow!

    Season One was very high quality film and Season Two is definitely kept as high. A must-see: good entertainment as well as historical. Very good attention to accuracy of the period & events.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Heroes with far too bloody hands

    As I watched this series unfold into its second season, I gradually realized that its two protagonists (ex-legionaries of the Roman army trying to adjust to civil life in turbulent times) were both sociopaths and psychopaths. Literally anyone who crossed their paths or got in their way was butchered by these two "heroes" with a mixture of casual abandon and a real enjoyment of slaughter. The penultimate scene has these two characters coming across a roadblock manned by soldiers, prompting one to remark to the other, "I'll bet I can kill more of them than you." The historicallly-based other major characters in this production are also constantly dispatching all and sundry real or imagined opponents without the slightest of qualms. In one scene, Mark Antony beats a fellow senator to death on the Senate floor with a scroll rod after hearing an insulting letter read to him by the man. In short, what was a promising first season of this show morphed along the way into a gangster drama. I know Roman history well enough to appreciate that it was no flower-scented romp in the park, but HBO should also be reminded that not all their shows have to be copies of "The Sopranos" either. For me, at least, there have to be characters with consciences and a reluctance to spill blood alongside of the murderous power-seekers in order for me to identify with them and be concerned about their fates. By the end of this series, I really couldn't care what happened to Lucius and Titus. They had broken too many necks and sank blades into too many bodies for it to matter to me.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Incredible... Wonderful... Television at its best.

    I saw this series when it originally aired on HBO. I was so disappointed there wasn't a third season. I would settle for 100% fiction at this point. Every nuance was a shear delight, the story which did take some liberties, was captivating, the interpersonal relationships between characters was compelling. While I do agree it was violent, much of the story line revolved around war and those who engage in and lead it. I guess some would prefer watching the excitement of sleep. I await the blu-ray version of the program with baited breath.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Loved it

    I saw this show when it first premiered on HBO. The acting, the plots, the directing--all fantasic. You won't be disappointed if great entertainment is what you're looking for. I'm glad it's finally coming out onto DVD.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 11, 2010

    best show i ever saw

    I absolutely adore this show, i hope they make a part 3 i watched it non stop i could not get enough of it. So wonderfully cast and the characters put me in the mind of the actual people the show depicted.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Life is cheap

    Rome Season II follows the aftermath of Ceasar's demise -- it's a bloody affair. Whereas the first season had intelligent writing and interesting character studies, this merely slips into vulgarity and a murder every few minutes. Life is worthless, torture is fun, and honor is nonexistent. Unfortunately, even the rich visuals cannot blot out the stabbings, the whippings, the withered heads ..... At one point, Timon screams, "I am not an animal!" The rest of Rome apparently is.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted April 26, 2009

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    Posted October 13, 2008

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    Posted January 3, 2011

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    Posted October 27, 2009

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    Posted August 14, 2009

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    Posted February 5, 2011

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    Posted July 11, 2009

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    Posted October 25, 2010

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    Posted January 28, 2010

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    Posted January 2, 2009

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    Posted April 9, 2009

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    Posted December 7, 2012

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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews