Rubber

Rubber

Director: Quentin Dupieux

Cast: Quentin Dupieux, Stephen Spinella, Jack Plotnick, Wings Hauser

     
 

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The old saying about "this is where the rubber meets the road" takes on a new and sinister meaning in this black comedy from filmmaker Quentin Dupieux. An old tire appears in a California desert, and under its own power it begins rolling down the road, stopping and starting as it pleases. The notion that the tire can operate under its

Overview

The old saying about "this is where the rubber meets the road" takes on a new and sinister meaning in this black comedy from filmmaker Quentin Dupieux. An old tire appears in a California desert, and under its own power it begins rolling down the road, stopping and starting as it pleases. The notion that the tire can operate under its own power isn't half as remarkable as its other talent -- the tire has telekinetic abilities and can make things explode at will, including human heads. The evil tire goes on a killing spree after its affections for a beautiful woman (Roxane Mesquida) are thwarted, and local lawman Lt. Chad (Stephen Spinella) steps forward to investigate. Meanwhile, a handful of people aware of the tire and its actions are watching it from a safe distance until they're poisoned by a mysterious villain; one of them (Wings Hauser) manages to survive, and is looking for some revenge of his own. Rubber was an official selection at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jeremy Wheeler
For a film about a telekinetic killer tire, Rubber has a lot more going for it than just a ridiculous concept. Wunderkind filmmaker and house DJ Quentin Dupieux (aka Mr. Oizo) takes a rather thin setup and injects it with an ingenuity that, for the most part, is unexpected, hilarious, and refreshing. The best parts feature just the tire, starting with it wriggling out of a junkyard and feeling out the world around it (think of the inspired Sandman introduction in Spider-Man 3). As soon as it begins to roll, the tire is empowered by the small objects it treads over -- and when bigger things are encountered (alive or otherwise), it develops a killer mind power that makes its targets explode. Then it moves on. At one point you could say that the tire falls in love. Yes, Rubber goes there. Unfortunately, the movie also goes to a few other unnecessary places -- beginning with the postmodern monologue that opens the film. You see, Rubber goes really out of its way to explain itself. Adapting the "no reason" moniker, it makes jokes about things like E.T.'s skin color just to point out that sometimes things happen in movies for no reason at all. That's well enough, even though the monologue might be a bit long (especially considering it gets replayed in the end credits), but that speech epitomizes what doesn't really work in the film -- the human scenes. Hell, B-movie great Wings Hauser is in the movie, and his big moment requires him to object to, of all things, the narrative of the movie. So basically the film is broken up into segments where the director successfully toys with conceptualizing the absurdity of a killer tire in a rather novel and stylized way, yet he then piles on scenes of people postulating about the deconstruction of the said film. To put it bluntly, it's a bit too much. And, frankly, the human scenes just aren't that funny. That said, the tire sequences are incredible. In fact, a few moments are near transcendent. When Rubber is cookin', it's making quite a meal for itself. Even if it's just a shot of the tire cruisin' down the freeway, the subtle effects are dazzling -- and the score (provided by Oizo and Justice's Gaspar Agué) throbs with cool beats that bring to mind quirky high-minded music videos. As a filmmaker, Dupieux busts conventions and actually makes the audience feel for the tire, as outrageous as that may sound. Inherently experimental, yet thoroughly watchable, Rubber will connect with cult audiences, who will no doubt be surprised at how hilarious a one-note movie idea can really be when put in the right artist's hands.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/07/2011
UPC:
0876964003681
Original Release:
2010
Rating:
R
Source:
Magnolia
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
1:23:00
Sales rank:
13,566

Special Features

Closed Caption; ; Interview with Quentin Dupieux; Interview With Stephen Spinella; Interview With Jack Plotnick; Interview With Roxane Mesquida; ; Rubber Teaser Camera Tests; ; HDNet: A Look at Rubber; Theatrical Trailer

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Stephen Spinella Lieutenant Chad
Jack Plotnick Accountant
Wings Hauser Man in Wheelchair
Roxane Mesquida Sheila
Ethan Cohn Film Buff Ethan
Charley Koontz Film Buff Charley
Daniel Quinn Dad
Devin Brochu Son
Hayley Holmes Teenager Cindy
Haley Ramm Teenager Fiona
Cecilia Antoinette Woman
David Bowe Mr. Hugues
Remy Thorne Zach
Tara O'Brien Cleaning Lady
Thomas Duffy Cop Xavier
Pete Di Cecco Cop Luke
James Parks Cop Doug
Courtenay Kellen Taylor Cop Denise
Blake Robbins Cop Eric
Michael Ross Truck Driver
Gaspard Auge Hitchhiker
Pedro Winter Tires Burner

Technical Credits
Quentin Dupieux Director,Cinematographer,Editor,Screenwriter
Zach Bangma Art Director
Barzolff814 Special Effects
Julien Berlan Producer
Gregory Bernard Producer
Jamie Bresnan Costumes/Costume Designer
Marco Castilla Special Effects
Stéphane de Rocquigny Sound/Sound Designer
Valerie Deloof Sound/Sound Designer
Gaspard Auge Score Composer
Andy Henry Casting
Pascale Ingrand Production Designer
Milan Jancic Special Effects
Josef Lieck Associate Producer
Zsolt Magyar Sound/Sound Designer
Donna Morong Casting
Gadou Naudin Sound/Sound Designer
Oizo Score Composer
Valek Sykes Special Effects
Tom Talmon Special Effects

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Rubber
1. No Reason [5:06]
2. Enjoy [9:22]
3. That's Odd [4:17]
4. Let's Go [7:50]
5. Easy Rest Inn [2:33]
6. The Girl [6:26]
7. I Swear [7:05]
8. This Tire Is Alive [9:06]
9. Trouble [9:14]
10. 3 Days Later [10:09]
11. The End, Bye [6:40]
12. End Credits [4:25]

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