Saturday Night and Sunday Morning

( 2 )

Overview

"All I want is a good time. The rest is propaganda." That's the philosophy of archetypal British "angry young man" Arthur Seaton Albert Finney. A middle-class working stiff in a dead-end job, Arthur's principal goal in life is to survive the work week, then spend the weekend raising as much hell and drinking as much beer and other liquor as possible. Since pleasure is all that Arthur lives for, he thinks nothing of starting up an affair with the wife Rachel Roberts of one of his co-workers Bryan Pringle. His efforts to secure her an abortion when ...
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Overview

"All I want is a good time. The rest is propaganda." That's the philosophy of archetypal British "angry young man" Arthur Seaton Albert Finney. A middle-class working stiff in a dead-end job, Arthur's principal goal in life is to survive the work week, then spend the weekend raising as much hell and drinking as much beer and other liquor as possible. Since pleasure is all that Arthur lives for, he thinks nothing of starting up an affair with the wife Rachel Roberts of one of his co-workers Bryan Pringle. His efforts to secure her an abortion when he gets her pregnant stem not out of concern for her but out of his own selfishness: why should he be tied down with a squalling brat? Despite his carousing and his ongoing desire to escape the dull routine of his weekday existence, Arthur is doomed to perpetuate that routine via his marriage to a complacent "nice" girl Shirley Ann Field from his own neighborhood.
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Mark Deming
While it was hardly the first of the British "Angry Young Man" dramas of the late 1950s/early 1960s (Look Back In Anger beat it to the screen by nearly two years), Saturday Night and Sunday Morning was one of the best, thanks largely to a superb performance by Albert Finney in his first leading film role. Finney's turn as Arthur Seaton practically defined the archetypal working-class yob who is just smart enough to know that his life is going nowhere, but not sharp enough to do anything about it; dozens more like him would follow, but few were able to give him the street smarts and fine edge of bitter wit that Finney brought to the character's charming amorality. The film made him a star overnight. Director Karel Reisz knew enough to keep Finney front and center throughout, but he also created an appropriately dingy atmosphere for his star; the film's sense of grubby detail is so keen that one can almost smell the smoke and stale beer in the pubs, and feel the heat in the factory where Arthur spends his weekdays. If time has dated Alan Sillitoe's screenplay, its spirit remains true to any post-adolescent would-be rebel either searching for a cause or not bothering to look for one. While Rachel Roberts doesn't get nearly as showy a role as Finney, her performance as Brenda, the unhappy housewife having an affair with Arthur, is every bit as strong, and she's perhaps the only actor in this movie who doesn't seem intimidated in her scenes with the leading man. Saturday Night and Sunday Morning can't escape being a product of its time, but its intelligence and rich store of talent make it powerful and relevant for any generation.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/5/2002
  • UPC: 883904127246
  • Original Release: 1961
  • Source: Mgm (Video & Dvd)
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Albert Finney Arthur Seaton
Shirley Ann Field Doreen Gretton
Rachel Roberts Brenda
Hylda Baker Aunt Ada
Norman Rossington Bert
Bryan Pringle Jack
Robert Cawdron Robboe
Edna Morris Mrs. Bull
Elsie Wagstaffe Mrs. Seaton
Frank Pettitt Mr. Seaton
Avis Bunnage Blowsy Woman
Colin Blakely Loudmouth
Irene Richmond Doreen's Mother
Louise Dunn Betty
Anne Blake Civil Defense Officer
Peter Madden Drunk
Cameron Hall Mr. Bull
Alister Williamson Police Constable
Technical Credits
Karel Reisz Director
Johnny Dankworth Score Composer, Songwriter, Musical Direction/Supervision
Sophie Devine Costumes/Costume Designer
Freddie Francis Cinematographer
Barbara Gillett Costumes/Costume Designer
Peter Handford Sound/Sound Designer
Seth Holt Editor
Ted Marshall Art Director
Tony Richardson Producer
Harry Saltzman Producer
Alan Sillitoe Screenwriter
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Charming Rogue With a Class Conscience

    This is early 60's British "Kitchen sink" cinema that tries to mix a bit of workingclass politics and bittersweet love stories. "The Girl with Green Eyes," "Morgan" and "Georgy Girls" are also in this group. The black and white cinematography is realistic and delightful. The acting is superb and the story engrossing.
    Fans of the Beatles will want to watch to catch one of the best depictions of the atmostphere that young men in England faced growing up in the 1950's and 1960's.
    The wonderful catchphrase, "I believe you, million's wouldn't." and Finney's opening declaration, "All I want is a good time. All the rest is propaganda," shows the wit of the script.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Thoughtful Account of a Young Man Living in Working Class Britain

    This is an interesting film directly from the slice of life style of film making popular in Britain in the late 50s and early 60s. Albert Finney plays a not so nice young man who works a factory job like many other people who live in his area. He life revolves around going out on Saturday Nights and early Sunday mornings. A married woman becomes pregnant but he shows only irritation and contempt. A young woman he could actually love comes around...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews