Scorpio

( 1 )

Overview

This spy thriller from future Death Wish 1974 director Michael Winner stars Burt Lancaster as the enigmatic Cross, a CIA agent who has hired a government assassin, Jean Laurier Alain Delon, to kill an Arab terrorist. Once they return home, Laurier is arrested by his superior, McLeod John Colicos, who wants to know why Cross is still alive, as Laurier was ordered to kill him as well. Laurier doesn't think that Cross is guilty of the crime, but he relents and agrees to carry out the contract for a higher price. ...
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Overview

This spy thriller from future Death Wish 1974 director Michael Winner stars Burt Lancaster as the enigmatic Cross, a CIA agent who has hired a government assassin, Jean Laurier Alain Delon, to kill an Arab terrorist. Once they return home, Laurier is arrested by his superior, McLeod John Colicos, who wants to know why Cross is still alive, as Laurier was ordered to kill him as well. Laurier doesn't think that Cross is guilty of the crime, but he relents and agrees to carry out the contract for a higher price. Cross, suspected of selling secrets to the Soviets, learns that his life is in danger and flees to Vienna, where he is aided by a former comrade-in-arms from WWII, the sympathetic KGB agent Sergei Zharkov Paul Scofield. When Cross learns that his wife Joanne Linville has been murdered by McLeod, he returns to the U.S. and kills him, leading to a bloody final confrontation with a reluctant Laurier, who is shocked to discover that his lover Gayle Hunnicutt is in league with Cross. Scorpio 1973 was the writing debut of David W. Rintels, who went on to author several critically respected made-for-TV films.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/18/2000
  • UPC: 883904128687
  • Original Release: 1973
  • Source: Mgm (Video & Dvd)
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Burt Lancaster Cross
Alain Delon Laurier
Paul Scofield Zharkov
John Colicos McLeod
Gayle Hunnicutt Susan
J.D. Cannon Filchock
Bill Nagy Man at Animal Home
Vladek Sheybal Zametkin
Mary Maude Ann
Woodrow Chambliss
Joanne Linville Sarah
Mel Stewart Pick
Jack Colvin Thief
Burke Byrnes Morrison
William Smithers Mitchell
Shmuel Rodensky Lang
Howard Morton Heck Thomas
Celeste Yarnall Helen Thomas
Sandor Eles Malkin
Frederick Jaeger Novins
George Mikell Dor
Robert Emhardt Man In Hotel
James B. Sikking Harris
Technical Credits
Michael Winner Director
Michael Dryhurst Asst. Director
Jerry Fielding Score Composer
Alan R. Gibbs Stunts
Brian Marshall Sound/Sound Designer
Richard Mills Makeup
Walter Mirisch Producer
Robert Paynter Cinematographer
David W. Rintels Screenwriter
Herbert Westbrook Art Director
Freddie Wilson Editor
Frederick Wilson Editor
Gerald Wilson Screenwriter
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Scorpio

    This film benefits from the performances of its stars, Burt Lancaster and Alain Delon, but the transfer is rather poor and much of the dialog sounds obviously dubbed. It is slower than today's action movies, but the tension between Delon and Lancaster is good. There is a good performance bythe actor playing a Russian agent. In general it is not as good as films like The Three Days of the Condor, The Day of the Jackal or the Marathon Man, all of which are much better realized.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews